Journalism

NPR photo

Longtime NPR newscaster and Wait! Wait! Don't Tell Me sidekick Carl Kasell died this week of complications from Alzheimer's disease.  He was 84 years old.  On today's show, we revisit our 2012 interview with him, recorded while he was in town recording an episode of the comedy quiz show.

J. Albert Bowden II / Flickr

It’s Sunshine Week, and that’s not a crack about the weather. The annual event is an effort led by news organizations, that seeks to inform people about their right to access public information. It’s a right that has had many enemies - both historically and currently - but it’s also a right that has endured many tests.

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For more than a decade, residents in St. Francis, Wisconsin have been complaining about smells. Sometimes putrid and often abrasive, these smells wafted over local residents from the nearby Mid-America Steel Drum plant.

NPR photo

NPR was a different place when Robert Siegel walked in the door for the first time in late 1976.  For one thing, it was still commonly referred to by its full name.  "I was utterly seduced by National Public Radio," Siegel says.  "We didn't shrink from spelling it out in those days."

Foreign and Commonwealth Office / Flickr

When journalist Maziar Bahari went to his home country Iran in 2009, he had no idea what was in store for him. As protests mounted in opposition to the re-election of then President Mahmoud Ahmadinijad, Bahari was imprisoned by the Iranian Government - simply for doing his job.

Eric Von had already been in radio for a long time when he started making regular contributions to Lake Effect and WUWM. Von hosted talk shows at a variety of stations throughout his career, winding up at WNOV. Von also was the host of  Precious Lives, a collaborative series between WUWM, 371 Productions and others.

Clare Peterson / Marquette

As President Obama prepares to give the final press conference of his presidency on Wednesday, NPR's Michel Martin is looking towards the next Administration with a wary - but not entirely pessimistic - eye.

"I've just never been a fan of being mad in advance," the weekend host of All Things Considered says, "or being afraid in advance.  I think you give people the benefit of the doubt until they give you a reason to think otherwise."

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The nationwide sexual abuse scandal involving Catholic priests has gotten increased scrutiny in recent days with the release of a new movie about the investigation.  “Spotlight” dramatizes the effort by the Boston Globe newspaper to bring abuses by priests in the Boston archdiocese to light.

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As the debate over Governor Walker’s proposed budget continues in the Wisconsin legislature, the statewide story is getting an unprecedented amount of national coverage.

Meanwhile, Scott Walker’s probable presidential bid has led many local media outlets to turn reporters normally on a Wisconsin-specific beat into national political reporters.

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The deaths of international journalists at the hands of ISIS militants in past months were tragedies. And they come at a time when reliable, independent reporting from war zones is more difficult to come by.

Mustafa Khayat / Flickr

As a two-day conference at Marquette University wraps up, some remarkable long-form public service journalism is being featured.

Manin the Moon, flickr

Do you think of yourself as a journalist? One media ethicist says you should - and you should follow the rules that go along with the title.

Social media tools continue to grow in popularity. About a billion people are now on Facebook, and half that many have Twitter accounts.