Lake Effect

"Unsolved" / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The second season of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Unsolved podcast begins with the following clip:

angelo.gi / Fotolia

Each month, cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect to talk about the life of a professional classical musician. Our On That Note series has tackled everything from traveling with an extremely rare and valuable instrument too large for the overhead bin to what it’s like to perform with musicians who were once your students.

The real-life challenges surrounding sex, power, and consent on college campuses are the inspiration for a new novel by author Tom Perrotta. Mrs. Fletcher tells the story of Eve, a divorced mom who suddenly finds herself an empty nester after dropping her son off at college.

Brendan is her son, and he gets to school with a certain attitude towards women and sex that he finds challenged when he gets there. Meanwhile, Eve is having, perhaps the opposite awakening. It’s a novel that is both uncomfortable and humorous.

Monkey Business / Fotolia

For the most part, college students are back on campus and in class. For freshmen, it’s often their first real taste of freedom, a time when they’re becoming adults and breaking free of limitations they’ve had at home.

It’s also a time of experimentation for many - with alcohol, street drugs and with sex. Sex and how it fits into university life is a complex one, with hook-ups co-existing with greater awareness of sexual assault and the importance of consent.

Frederick L.G. Straubel / Wisconsin Historical Society

During the late 19th and early 20th Century, the Fox River Valley in Eastern Wisconsin was a segregated town essentially built for and by white men of means. Irishmen and African Americans living there suffered the most, with women and children close behind.

Those men working in the Fox River Valley paper and wood product factories faced 12 hour days, without breaks and were paid less than a living wage.

Nicole Acosta

The official start to Ex Fabula Season 9 isn’t until October. However, like football (only more fun) we, too, have a pre-season line-up for you beginning on September 7th. Join us at the Milwaukee Art Museum for Ex Fabula: Power, Dissent & Youth Empowerment.

Rachel Morello

Every few weeks, WUWM education reporter Rachel Morello will open up her notebook to give us the scoop about what's happening in schools around the greater Milwaukee area. Test your knowledge of headlines big & small with her education news quiz! Here's what she brought us at the beginning of the new school year...

Hard to believe it's already September 1, and school is back in session for many (if not most) kids around the Milwaukee area!

Depending on where you live in the United States, you might might describe your weekend getaway differently. Here in Wisconsin, you might head up to your cottage. Or maybe it’s your cabin - that’s how people in Minnesota generally refer to it. In the northeast - places like Maine and the Adirondacks - people talk about going to their “camp.”

electrochris / Fotolia

To some people, camping is the ultimate getaway. Lake Effect essayist Meagan Schultz is not one of these people.  

“We’ve never done this before,” my husband said to me with obvious reluctance. “Why don’t we just try one night and see how it goes?”

Brittnie Peck

Towering Pines Camp For Boys came to life in 1945. As environmental awareness was on the rise in the 1970s, the northern Wisconsin camp pioneered an environmental immersion program that garnered national attention.

They call it acclimatization.

The campers merge with the natural world – in some unconventional ways. For instance, camp leaders teach the kids what it feels like to navigate the world like a raccoon.

Youth Council Members Reflect On Milwaukee's Housing Marches

Sep 1, 2017
Courtesy of The Milwaukee Journal

The concerted push for open housing in Milwaukee began 50 years ago this week. Demonstrators marched for 200 consecutive days, trying to convince the Common Council to pass a fair housing ordinance.  The NAACP Youth Council played a major role in the movement. Journalism students at Marquette University interviewed a number of them this year, and shared their stories with WUWM.

Photograph by A24 / Everett

There are hundreds of heist films in cinematic history. From How to Steal A Million, to Reservoir Dogs, The Italian Job, and the aptly named film Heist.

Kimpton Journeyman Hotel

Many of us might be thinking of a getaway for the upcoming Labor Day weekend, but for people from elsewhere, Milwaukee is a destination.  And when they get here, they’ll be coming to a place that has seen a dramatic increase in the number of hotels and hotel rooms available.

Feng Yu / Fotolia

In the last few decades autism rates have skyrocketed in the United States. There are theories as to why, but many point to increased awareness and thus diagnosis, as at least partly responsible for the uptick.

Forty years ago, the condition was still relatively unknown to the general public and a diagnosis of autism could mean a lifetime of abuse and discrimination. 

Mitch Teich

For centuries, humans have used boats for work and transportation. However, rowing boats for sport didn’t start until the early and mid-eighteen hundreds, at English universities like Oxford and Cambridge.

It caught on later in the United States, though the annual rowing match between Harvard and Yale has been held for more than 150 years.

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