Lake Effect

Mitch Teich

It was the late 1930s when the surge of nationalism in Germany gave rise to Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party and the so-called Third Reich.

That nationalist movement was not limited to Europe, however. It was supported by German immigrants and others of German descent around the world, including the United States. In fact, southeastern Wisconsin was home to two camps run by an American Nazi group, called the German-American Bund.

The National Museum of American History / americanhistory.si.edu

Radio Chipstone has examined the American flag as both an object and a symbol in its past few installments. The final piece features Kelli - an African-American woman raised in Chicago. Although she was exposed to a diverse family and friend circle mostly through her father's side, her family still held a great sense of pride for their black culture.

Art Montes

How do you identify yourself? Are you a middle-aged disabled woman; a working single mother; a transgendered project manager; a social justice activist? Maybe you are several of these identities. Have you ever considered how the boxes we check to identify ourselves can both empower and imprison us?

This week we have two powerful stories about identity and the boxes we assign to others and ourselves.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Jacqui Patterson works in communities around the country to engage African-Americans on climate issues. She directs the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program and helped build the program from the ground up.

A Milwaukee Judge's Perspective on Segregation

Mar 10, 2017
Andy Dean / Fotolia

Merriam-Webster defines the word “segregate” in two ways: “to separate or set apart from others or from the general mass,” and “to cause or force the separation of (as from the rest of society).” It defines “segregation” as the act of segregating; it gives a secondary definition of “segregation” as “the separation or isolation of a race, class or ethnic group by enforced of voluntary residence in a restricted area . . . .”

Susan Bence

WUWM has been taking a comprehensive look at some of the many issues caused by segregation in Milwaukee through our series, ​Project Milwaukee: Segregation MattersBetween reports on WUWM news and interviews on Lake Effect, we have looked at how segregation can be quantified, how it's perpetuated, and its costs and effects on the community.

arinahabich / Fotolia

There are many neighborhoods in Milwaukee that lack easy access to grocery stores. Near West Side Partners and Marquette University have launched The Grocery Challenge to seek solutions.

Jessi Paetzke

A number of reports surfaced this week that White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus is being met with dissent in the executive office. Some White House staff members dispute that report.

What seems indisputable is that he was not always seen as a likely candidate for national political fame. 

David Flowers

Milwaukee native Davita Flowers-Shanklin brings a unique experience to the discussion of segregation, and its ripple effects.

“I remember being in high school and being really into science and biology. I was the co-director of Camp Everytown, which is a diversity camp for teenagers," Flowers-Shanklin says. "So my work even as a teenager was around anti-oppression."

Jim Moy for Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

Segregation can impact a person's body, mind and health. Not everyone has the same opportunity to be healthy in a city like Milwaukee.

Dr. Julie Schuller says the lack of access to quality healthcare and environmental factors inhibit segregated African-American and Latino populations from living healthy lifestyles.

Courtesy of UWM, David Pate

The road to modern segregation has been a long one. "There's been 350 years of segregation in our country that was perpetuated by the government as well as by the social norms, based on race in particular," says David Pate

Pate studies the complex causes, effects and potential solutions of segregation in his role as an associate professor of social work at the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare at UW-Milwaukee. He says that after centuries of segregation, it's become normalized.  

Mitch Teich

Writer Kwame Alexander has penned more than a dozen books for young readers. His novel-in-verse, The Crossover, won the Newbery Medal in 2015. It tells the story of two basketball playing twin brothers, and was followed up by another novel-in-verse, Booked, which has a soccer theme. 

Joseph Ellwanger

For clergyman Joseph Ellwanger, the battle to end racial injustices across the U.S. involved overseeing the desegregation of the pews of his church.

Ellwanger is pastor emeritus of the Cross Lutheran Church in Milwaukee. During his stewardship, from 1967 to 2001, Cross Lutheran evolved from a predominately white congregation to an integrated one.

Louisa Thomson / Flickr

Segregation is connected to issues ranging from education to housing to health. So, it’s no coincidence that evictions disproportionately affects certain neighborhoods in Milwaukee.

Writer and researcher Matthew Desmond chronicled the issue of eviction and its impact in Milwaukee last year in the landmark book, Evicted.

LISTEN: 'Evicted' Book Paints a Heartbreaking Picture of a Milwaukee Under Stress

Kat Schleicher / Ex Fabula

Love. Right now, there are countless people celebrating it, cursing it or searching for it. And who can blame them? Love is a many splendor thing. So this week, we’ve asked some of our volunteers what their favorite Ex Fabula Love Stories are and now we’re sharing them with you.

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