Lake Effect

David Flowers

Milwaukee native Davita Flowers-Shanklin brings a unique experience to the discussion of segregation, and its ripple effects.

“I remember being in high school and being really into science and biology. I was the co-director of Camp Everytown, which is a diversity camp for teenagers," Flowers-Shanklin says. "So my work even as a teenager was around anti-oppression."

Jim Moy for Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

Segregation can impact a person's body, mind and health. Not everyone has the same opportunity to be healthy in a city like Milwaukee.

Dr. Julie Schuller says the lack of access to quality healthcare and environmental factors inhibit segregated African-American and Latino populations from living healthy lifestyles.

Courtesy of UWM, David Pate

The road to modern segregation has been a long one. "There's been 350 years of segregation in our country that was perpetuated by the government as well as by the social norms, based on race in particular," says David Pate

Pate studies the complex causes, effects and potential solutions of segregation in his role as an associate professor of social work at the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare at UW-Milwaukee. He says that after centuries of segregation, it's become normalized.  

Mitch Teich

Writer Kwame Alexander has penned more than a dozen books for young readers. His novel-in-verse, The Crossover, won the Newbery Medal in 2015. It tells the story of two basketball playing twin brothers, and was followed up by another novel-in-verse, Booked, which has a soccer theme. 

Joseph Ellwanger

For clergyman Joseph Ellwanger, the battle to end racial injustices across the U.S. involved overseeing the desegregation of the pews of his church.

Ellwanger is pastor emeritus of the Cross Lutheran Church in Milwaukee. During his stewardship, from 1967 to 2001, Cross Lutheran evolved from a predominately white congregation to an integrated one.

Louisa Thomson / Flickr

Segregation is connected to issues ranging from education to housing to health. So, it’s no coincidence that evictions disproportionately affects certain neighborhoods in Milwaukee.

Writer and researcher Matthew Desmond chronicled the issue of eviction and its impact in Milwaukee last year in the landmark book, Evicted.

LISTEN: 'Evicted' Book Paints a Heartbreaking Picture of a Milwaukee Under Stress

Kat Schleicher / Ex Fabula

Love. Right now, there are countless people celebrating it, cursing it or searching for it. And who can blame them? Love is a many splendor thing. So this week, we’ve asked some of our volunteers what their favorite Ex Fabula Love Stories are and now we’re sharing them with you.

Chris Arnade

During the early to mid-1900s, the Great Migration brought millions of African-Americans from rural, southern towns to cities like Chicago, Detroit, and of course, Milwaukee.

To this day, many older, black Milwaukeeans have roots in the South. Many moved here as teens and young adults, looking for work in an industrial city that overflowed with jobs at the time.

Michael / Fotolia

The issues facing the Great Lakes are often referred to in chronological terms. From the cryptosporidium outbreak that affected Milwaukee water in 1993 to the suffocating invasions of - first, zebra mussels, then quagga mussels. Plus the decline of the lake trout and perch population, and the fall in water levels are key problems we face today.

In 2014, Time magazine faced public outcry for including the word feminist in its Worst Words Poll, which asked readers what word they felt should be banned in 2015. The magazine apologized for the “execution” of the poll, but the controversy speaks to the many, mixed emotions that the word often elicits.

erikaslezak.com

The United Performing Arts Fund, or UPAF, supports arts organizations of various types across Milwaukee, from music to the visual and performing arts.  The organization began in 1967 as a way to stabilize the finances of Milwaukee's prominent performing arts groups, including the Milwaukee Repertory Theater.

Mike Magione

Milwaukee-area musician Mike Mangione's podcast, called Time & The Mystery, is described as a series of artist-to-artist conversations with musicians, actors, comedians and others about the philosophy behind what they do and how they connect with their audience.

Stuart Seeger / Flickr

It used to be that coaches and trainers didn’t pay much attention when an athlete took a blow to the head during practice or competition. But that attitude has changed drastically over the last couple decades.

"I think we've gone a complete 180," says Lindsay Nelson, an assistant professor of neurosurgery and neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. 

There are a lot of people who spend decades trying to figure out what to do with their lives, reinventing themselves as they go.  And that may well be the case for Gabe Burdulis and Thea Grace, but that's not their plan at the moment.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

It’s a good time of year to be sports fan. In the coming weeks, there are two major events on the calendar: the NCAA basketball tournament and the start of baseball season. If you listen to Wisconsin Badgers basketball games on the radio or watch the Milwaukee Brewers on TV, there’s a good chance you've heard Matt Lepay. 

Lepay is the longtime radio play-by-play man for Wisconsin basketball and football, and now a fill-in television announcer for the Brewers. Lepay is an Ohio native who has won Wisconsin’s sportscaster of the year award seven times.

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