Lake Effect

Reginald Baylor

Milwaukee artist Reggie Baylor has made a name for himself as both a painter and the creator of public art projects. He’s deeply committed to his home town of Milwaukee.

Eugene Kim / Flickr

How many fish fries do you go to on an average year? Have you been to every local custard stand to compare and decide who truly has the best chocolate flavor? Maybe your summer isn’t complete without going to a lakefront festival, or tailgating at Miller Park with a properly cooked brat.

BBC World Service / Flickr

The reverberations from the election of Donald Trump to the presidency are continuing to echo around Wisconsin, the country, and the world.  In fact, it seems people in other countries are having almost as many conversations about the historic 2016 election as in the United States. 

Claire Bolderson is a former BBC correspondent and now independent journalist who has covered numerous US elections and other momentous ballot issues, such as the Brexit vote earlier this year.  From London, she added her take on the election.

Mitch Teich

A guitar player receives a letter from a record company, saying his band's demo tape was very well-received, and asking the group to come in for a meeting.  Only problem is, the letter arrives 33 years late, and not surprisingly, the band has long split up.

AroesteGeneralPR / saraharoeste.com

Wednesday night at the Latino Arts Center, Milwaukee audiences have the rare opportunity to hear a musician performing in a language that is considered to be endangered.

Mitch Teich

People have been inundated with election coverage for months now, but it’s not just Americans who have been riveted to this historic campaign season. 

Many international journalists are in the United States both to cover the election and to learn more about federal elections in this country. As many casual observers have noticed, this has been an unusually contentious election cycle for the U.S. For some, the dirty politics at play in this election has reminded them of elections in their own countries. 

Oxford University Press

As happens in every election cycle, a lot of attention has been paid to national polls this year. But as many political analysts have pointed out, the polls that really affect the election come from so-called swing states, like Florida, Ohio, and Wisconsin. How did we get here?

dany13 / Flickr

To many of us, the South Pacific seems like a slice of paradise: gentle trade winds, crystal clear water, lovely beaches. And that’s actually a pretty accurate picture of the Pacific, or at least it was, until around 1950.

Jandrie Lombard / Fotolia

In today’s technology-immersed world, how much technology is too much for a growing child? Outside of the computers and tablets they may use in school, much of a typical kid’s social or entertainment time these days might be of the electronic variety.

Essay: Voting

Nov 7, 2016
flysnow / Fotolia

No matter who you vote for in tomorrow’s elections, there’s a good chance you might be disappointed by the results of at least one race.  That’s OK, says Lake Effect essayist Avi Lank – it comes with the territory:

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for breakwaters around the country, including the Great Lakes.  

The structures calm the waters within them to allow ships and smaller vessels to navigate safely, but take quite a beating, given shifting lake levels and seasonal storms.   

The usual "fix" is to install big boulders, 6 to 10-feet in size, to reinforce failing stretches of breakwater.

Boys and Girls Clubs

Whether its Beyonce's Run the World (Girls) or Emma Watson's (Hermione from Harry Potter) #HeforShe campaign, young people are increasingly seeing the world through the lens of female empowerment.

When it started, more than 125 years ago, The Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee only served boys, but they’ve progressed over the intervening decades.  Since 1984, the organization has been open to girls as well.

Illustrations by Paige Clark
Courtesy of Jeanette Hurt/Seal Press

Traditionally, the tavern was a place where predominantly men went for fellowship and libations. Today, bars see a clientele pretty well divided between men and women, and the people serving the drinks are more likely to be women than ever before.

Felix Schmidt

Any artist will tell you that they couldn’t have gotten where they did without the influence of mentors. For cellist and Lake Effect contributor Robert Cohen, that person was the late British cellist William Pleeth.

In this month's On That Note segment, Cohen shares more about his mentor, who would have celebrated his 100th birthday this year.

WorldSkills UK / Flickr

Forensic science has long been the basis for popular prime time television. From Jack Klugman’s classic Quincy character in the 1970s and '80s to the various versions of CSI, forensic science has peaked our cultural curiosity for decades. 

It turns out that reality is equally as interesting. Diana Johnson knows this firsthand. She has seen the work in real life, as a forensic scientist with the New Jersey State Police. Now, she teaches the next generation of forensic scientists at Marian University in Fond du Lac.

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