Lake Effect

For many years, Joel Huntley was living the dream. Huntley is a Master Potter and produced works in his ceramics studio in Columbus, Wisconsin. However, when the market turned...Huntley was forced to face reality and close his shop for good. In this edition of It's a Material World, contributor Gianofer Fields met Huntley in the Midwest Ceramics Studio in Madison Wisconsin where he was reintroduced to some old friends:

joshme17/Flickr

You were probably warned as a child to never combine water and electricity. The list of things not to do was impressive – don’t walk outside in a lightning storm, don’t plug in a hair dryer over a sink full of water. Essentially we were told some variation of "keep them far, far apart."

Well, Brooke Mayer didn’t get that message. Or if she did, she ignored it.

Illustrated by Gustaf Tenggren

Many fairy tales have resurfaced in various forms on film, stage, musicals and even operas to appeal to large audience of all ages.

However, the classic fairy tales originally written by Brothers Grimm were gruesome, sexual and slightly violent - a far cry from the sanitized versions of today. The 2015 Cinderella film by Disney excludes pigeons pecking out the stepsister's eyes, and the sisters cutting off their toes and heels in attempt to fit into the glass slipper.

Workman Publishing

The English language is usually a pretty useful tool. Most of us don't have too much trouble finding a word to describe what we're talking about.

But it's a rapidly changing world in which we live, and ideas often come along that defy easy explanation. Like, say, the use of microscopic components to build machines, it's a concept called nanorobotics.

A new book by Lizzie  Skurnick is about neologisms, names for things that didn't have names before.

stewart-onan.com

It was on this date, exactly 90 years ago that one of the classics of American literature was published. The Great Gatsby cemented the place of F. Scott Fitzgerald in the American literary tradition, and helped make a celebrity of Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda.

University of Nottingham / Flickr

The electrocardiograph – known as the ECG, or sometimes the EKG – has been an important tool in diagnosing heart issues for a long time.

One company that has been manufacturing electrocardiograph machines and other medical equipment for a more than 30 years is located on Milwaukee’s far northwest side. Mortara Instrument employs more than 200 people at its headquarters and manufacturing facility. However, it doesn’t get the attention of some of the industry’s giants.

Paul Ruffolo / First Stage Theater

Professional wrestling is nothing if not theatrical. There are good guys to cheer and bad guys to boo, and good and evil fight it out in the ring every night. When you talk about the Mexican tradition of lucha libre, in which the wrestlers wear colorful masks that they seldom remove - even in their real lives, the level of theatricality jumps even higher.

Essay: The Tattoo

Apr 9, 2015
Jhong Dizon / Flickr

EKG machines and other high-tech medical equipment are common in hospitals across the country. But as accurate and sensitive as they are, they can’t always answer the questions a doctor might have:

The images were dramatic. The young man was in his early 20s, and his shoulders, chest, and upper arms were covered with a swirling image of skulls, barbed wire, spider webs, and violent messages. The tattoos were, no doubt, meant to send a message to anyone who saw them. The images disappeared underneath the hospital gown that had been draped over him.

From Fat To Finish Line / facebook.com

Milwaukeean Rik Akey and New Yorker Jennifer Roe are among a dozen people around the country who have essentially reinvented themselves, turning their struggles with weight into lives as fit, dedicated runners.

And the latest chapter in their lives is a film they’re making on the journey the dozen runners are sharing – metaphorically and literally, as they prepare to run in the Ragnar Relay race from Miami to Key West next month. 

Rod Franklin

Internationally acclaimed guitarist Woody Mann doesn’t fit into neatly defined categories. He plays everything from ragtime to folk, from classical to blues, from jazz to world – and he writes his own tunes that draw on all of those influences and more. That wide ranging curiosity, coupled with stellar technique and a deep pleasure in making music, makes listening to Mann a joy.

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