Lake Effect

dpbirds / Flickr

This spring marks the anniversaries of the liberation of five concentration camps by United States forces. Seventy years after World War II's end, the effects and implications from the collective experiences of individuals and countries are still being felt. 

Professor of political economy and world business at Carthage College Art Cyr reflects on the legacy of World War II and how it shapes foreign and global policy today. 

The Waterboys

Whole of the Moon is the song The Waterboys are most famous for in the United States. The UK band had a string of hits in the late 1980s, before the members went their separate ways in the early ‘90s. 

Courtesy of Mark Olsky

The Mauthausen Concentration Camp in German-occupied Austria was liberated on May 4, 1945.  Among the more than 40,000 people rescued was Mark Olsky, who had been born just a few days before, in a cattle car en route to the camp.

With the camp's liberation, Olsky, his mother, and four of her siblings, survived the Holocaust - but just barely.

Olsky weighed only three pounds when he was born. His mother was under 70 pounds and was close to death. 

Wolfgang Gauch

We talk every month with cellist Robert Cohen of the Fine Arts Quartet, in a series of conversations called On That Note.

Cohen is recently back from London, and this month, he discusses the physical toll of being a professional touring musician, and whether there is regimen to follow to withstand that toll and still perform at your best:

Lake Effect contributor Robert Cohen is an award-winning recording artist, conductor, artistic director and cellist for the Fine Arts Quartet. 

Essay: A-Tisket, A-Tasket...Baskets Full of May

May 1, 2015
Wicker Paradise / Flickr

Today is May 1st, which is marked by many celebrations around the world.  Many of them honor workers, but it is a different tradition that essayist Marjorie Pagel remembers from her Wisconsin childhood:

"May basket!"

The cry at the kitchen door rings through the stillness of the spring night. Immediately the whole house comes alive. I am the first to reach the door. Snapping on the yard light, I rush outside to see the backs of three fleeing figures.

Jim Bauer, Flickr

New tourism numbers are out for Wisconsin; and for the first time in recorded history, the numbers were up in all 72 counties across the state in 2014.

A total of $11.4 billion in visitor spending was recorded across the state, and tourism was responsible for generating 1.4 billion in state and local taxes.

Great Lakes Environmental Film Festival, Facebook

Around a dozen filmmakers will be in Milwaukee over the weekend as Marquette University hosts the first annual Great Lakes Environmental Film Festival. The three-day long event is the last in a growing number of film festivals with environmental themes around the world.

WavebreakMediaMicro, Fotolia

The organization Meta House announced this morning that it will expand its intensive drug and alcohol treatment services for women in the Milwaukee area. The half-century old non-profit currently serves up to 35 women and 20 children at one time in its inpatient program in Riverwest.

Today, leaders of the organization announced that they will open a second in-patient center next month in Shorewood, Wisconsin.

Matthew Grapengieser / Flickr

Members of the newly-created Midwestern History Association believe the history and culture of this region has been neglected, and there’s a price to pay for that neglect.

"The history of New England and the east coast and the eastern seaboard is something we all know, very well, because that's all part of our early American history that we're supposed to study in grade school. But the Midwest gets left out of that equation," says historian John Lauk.

Marjan Lazarevski / Flickr

Lately, Lake Effect has been talking with astronomy contributor Jean Creighton about how things form in the universe – things such as stars.

This month, the focus is a little closer to home, or maybe a lot closer to home. How do planets, like our own, come to be? Lake Effect astronomy contributor Jean Creighton is the director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium, and she explains that stars come before planets:

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