Lake Effect

NASA

Dr. Kathy Sullivan hadn’t planned to go to space. The former astronaut went to school to study earth sciences, later earned a doctorate in geology. She worked as an oceanographer, but decided to apply to be an astronaut for the chance to see Earth with her own eyes and not through lenses.

HIBROW.TV

Cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect every month for On That Note, an ongoing conversation about the life of a touring classical musician.

Recently, Cohen made a large technological leap, which he's been contemplating for years. He bought a tablet. "I am now using an iPad on a special stand to read my music," he explains. 

angela n. / Flickr

The Supreme Court of the United States will soon hear oral arguments on Gill v. Whitford, also known as the Wisconsin gerrymandering case.

There is a lot of uncertainty as to how the court will rule, with most of the conservative and liberal justices coming down on opposite sides of the issue. As is often the case, Justice Kennedy will likely be the deciding vote.

Kat Schleischer

Lights...camera...action! It’s time for the 2017 Milwaukee Film Festival!  For the next two weeks the city will be abuzz with special events and screenings of nearly 300 new films. Ex Fabula is excited to return as a Community Partner for Shorts: Stories We Tell. We at Ex Fabula love a good, true, personal story and so naturally we love the wide-ranging collection of personal narratives in this category.

Chris Crain / Facebook

If you don’t know of Milwaukee musician Chris Crain, you should. The church musician, R&B singer, and multi-instrumentalist has overcome a lot to get where he is. Crain was born with brachial plexus palsy which prevents his left hand and arm from functioning fully.

Rachel Morello

Every few weeks, WUWM education reporter Rachel Morello opens up her notebook to give us the scoop about what’s happening in schools around the greater Milwaukee area. Test your knowledge of headlines big and small with her education news quiz.

Today marks the last Friday in September, and roughly the end of the first month of school. Can you believe it?

"Manlife" Documentary

If you’ve ever taken a drive south along I-94, you might remember seeing a roadside sign in Sturtevant - near Racine - that advertised the "University of Lawsonomy." Or you might have seen the painted sign on a barn that says “Study Natural Law.”

The "law" in question is Lawsonomy: a utopian movement that began in 1929 by Alfred Lawson, a British immigrant who, before he started the eponymous Lawsonomy, founded two Wisconsin airplane manufacturers, and is credited as the inventor of the first passenger airliner.

Milwaukee Bucks

The professional basketball season is still weeks off, but one of the most visible building projects in Milwaukee has people thinking about basketball year-round.

The new arena for the Milwaukee Bucks is due to open in time for the 2018-2019 season. But people involved in the project say that the progress goes beyond finding a place for pro athletes to play basketball.

Sara Stathas/Milwaukee Magazine

What do you think of, when you think of Milwaukee Public Schools?

This week, the Milwaukee Rep opens Brookfield native Ayad Akhtar’s play, The Who and the What. It’s the third of four plays of the Pulitzer Prize winner to be staged at the Rep, and it explores complex familial relationships as they relate to life, religion, and the pursuit of happiness. May Adrales directs, and she's also the newest associate artistic director at the Milwaukee Rep.

Michelle Maternowski

For years, state lawmakers have been expanding school choice throughout Wisconsin, allowing public dollars to follow kids to private schools. Now, the Trump administration is looking to expand voucher programs nationally.

WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel held a community conversation, titled  Across the Divide: Where is School Choice Header Under President Trump?, at Anodyne Coffee in Walker's Point on September 19 to bring together people with different perspectives on school choice.

berolino / Wikimedia

There are many stories of bravery and survival from the second world war - from soldiers risking everything to save their comrades to everyday people helping others escape. But one story of survival is perhaps not as well known - and that may be because Charlotte von Mahlsdorf hid herself in plain sight during the Nazi regime.

Born Lothar Berfelde in 1928, von Mahlsdorf was a self-described transvestite. She survived both the war and life in East Germany as openly transgender and was a beacon of hope to other European LGBTQ people throughout her life.

Mitch Teich

Donald Trump grabs worldwide headlines, it seems, every time he sends a message into the Twitterverse, whether it's about North Korea, or the National Anthem protests by professional athletes.  Wisconsin writer John Nichols says that while those stories have importance, there are equally important stories involving members of the Trump Administration that are going underreported.

photo courtesty of Morning Star Productions

In the world of organ transplants, one person could potentially save eight lives. Each donor has two lungs and two kidneys, as well as a heart, liver, pancreas, and intestine. When you count non-lifesaving organs, like eyes or skin, even more people could be helped by a complete body donation.

Many of us have the orange donor dot on our drivers’ licenses, but that alone isn't quite enough to ensure your wishes are carried out.

Sue Vliet

In 2014 the number of people receiving FoodShare benefits in Wisconsin dropped precipitously. And that sounds like a good thing: less people needing financial help to buy food should mean that there are less people in need. But it seems that might not be the case. As reporter Jabril Faraj found out, the change in recipients could have more to do with changes to eligibility requirements.

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