Lake Effect

Express Yourself Milwaukee / Flickr

For the last fifteen years, a project called Express Yourself Milwaukee has tried to break the cycle of violence and change hearts and minds through the arts. Every year, the group’s activities culminate in a public performance. This year's performance is called Illuminate and it aims to shine a light on the positive things going on in the lives of people. 

Sean Hagen / Flickr

Some cities around the country have found a way to connect unemployed and underemployed people with work by requiring a certain number of them be hired for public works projects and other developments made possible through public dollars.

Milwaukee has one of those programs, called the Residents Preference Program, or RPP.

Milwaukee's program has been around for more than two decades. But in recent years, criticism has been leveled that RPP has not had the level of success many had hoped for it.

Fotolia

If you work for a big enough employer, it's likely that you've been urged to participate in the company's wellness program. It could be an educational seminar or an office-wide weight loss competition, something that incentivizes healthier lifestyle choices. The idea is healthy employees increase productivity and save a company money. 

Mitch Teich / WUWM

A lot happened in the life of a young duck named Phillip before he ended up at the Autumn Farm Sanctuary in Cedarburg.

Susan Bence

Artists are busy creating along the Milwaukee Museum Mile, as part of Art in the City: Plein Air MKE. The flurry of small brush painting is part of a celebration of the Milwaukee Museum Mile’s fifth anniversary. One of its members is North Point Lighthouse.

John Scripp was one of the volunteers instrumental in breathing new life into the 1888 station.

YouTube/The Tab

Here's a story that defines "modern romance."

A social media storm rained down on the UW-Madison campus last week, as two students used the Snapchat app to make a romantic connection.

The students – identified as “Vikings Fan” and “Mystery Girl” – noticed each other on Snapchat’s location-based story, and began sending video messages back and forth. They had never met before. After communicating throughout the day, they began trying to track each other down. 

J.H. Fearless / Flickr

It's growing season, and eager gardeners are already starting their plants for the summer. The promise of fresh fruits and vegetables is what keeps people coming back to their garden plots. But gardening is messy business, and setting up your garden can be strenuous. For many, the worst part is preparing the soil. It's a painstaking process of digging and tilling, which can feel arduous and unrewarding. 

Gardening contributor, Melinda Myers, knows this all too well. That's why she suggests something called, "lasagna gardening." 

Jesse Willems / MSO

This weekend marks the 183rd birthday of the composer Johannes Brahms.  The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra celebrates that birthday with performances of both his third and fourth symphonies with one program.

Between rehearsals, Music Director of the MSO, Maestro Edo de Waart, explained his love of Brahms and why he is excited to conduct it this year.

Pickle Smith / Flickr

It's the time of year again. The sun is shining, the birds are chirping and the ground is ripe for planting. It's a good chance to check out heirloom varieties of vegetables, fruits and even flowers. 

If you're more likely to buy your produce than grow it, don't worry. It's also the season for farmers' markets and gardening centers. 

Contributor Stacy Tornio shares her list of heirloom plants to brighten up your garden (or salad):

IKEA

If you're a fan of meatballs and do-it-yourself furniture, then get ready. IKEA announced plans for a new store in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. Rumors have been circulating for years about a Wisconsin location for the home furnishings store, which plans to open up shop on a 100-acre site currently owned by Northwestern Mutual.

Jill Anna Ponasik

Milwaukee Opera Theater's new show, Song from the Uproar: The Lives and Death of Isabelle Eberhardt, is a multimedia chamber opera, guaranteed to be a unique theater experience.

Eberhardt was a 19th century Swiss explorer, who fell in love with the Sahara desert and traveled alone through Northern Africa. The show is based on her diaries, which were published decades after her death. 

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

When Making a Murderer premiered on Netflix last December, it entranced viewers and quickly became a household name. The ten part docuseries follows the real-life story of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who was falsely accused of a brutal rape and attempted murder, then charged and convicted of murdering another woman. The series shocked the nation with its in-depth look at how the homicide case was handled in Manitowoc County.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Public Schools

Each year, the Civic Music Association of Milwaukee rewards teachers and administrators from the area for their accomplishments. This year’s top honoree as Teacher of the Year is Benjamin Zabor, who is director of band and orchestra at MPS' Rufus King International High School.

Ailments like carpal tunnel syndrome and premenstrual syndrome may seem completely different from penis theft, also known as koro, but they actually have a lot in common. All three can be classified as "culture-bound syndromes," perceived maladies informed by the cultures where they appear. 

Tim Fuller

The Milwaukee Rep closes its season with a powerful production of August Wilson’s 1987 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Fences.

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