Lake Effect

Women of color in Milwaukee will be disproportionately harmed by a provision in the American Health Care Act ending Medicaid reimbursements for abortion providers, such as Planned Parenthood. This could result in severely limited services such as gynecological exams, STD testing and treatment, and contraception.

Until she was 20, Tiferet Berenbaum, 34, had never seen a gynecologist. She had never had a Pap smear, or even heard of one.

Maayan Silver / WUWM

As diverse as music is, music-makers come from equally wide-ranging backgrounds - spanning gender, ethnicity and age. Leaders of the Wisconsin Intergenerational Orchestra (WIO) say their mission is to connect players in that last category, in order to bring listeners fresh takes on classical masterpieces.

Artistic director of WIO, Anne Marie Peterson, speaks about working with such a diverse group including Julliard-bound viola player Tabby Rhee and her 16-year-old brother Julian.

Audrey Nowakowski

A typical group exercise class is lead by an instructor in a studio or gym. However one Milwaukee start up has partnered with a local gym to bring participants an immersive virtual reality experience that does not require a instructor to lead the class.

Bonnie North

Wisconsin Avenue has become a temporary sculpture garden courtesy of galleries, artists, and curator Russell Bowman. 'Sculpture Milwaukee' is an installation of 22 pieces that line Wisconsin Avenue from Sixth Street all the way to the lakefront. After their time in the limelight, Bowman hopes the pieces will be sold to support annual 'Sculpture Milwaukee' projects.  

David Haynes, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel hosted Across the Divide: New Realities for Immigrants, an event at Carroll University in Waukesha. On Monday, May 22, panelists shared their thoughts and experiences with community members about an issue that is as complicated as ever.

Meet the panelists:

Martin Dowman / Flickr

For most of us in the US, Memorial Day Weekend marks the unofficial beginning of summer, but the holiday itself is one of solemnity. 

Shortly after the end of the American Civil War, a day in May was designated as Decoration Day: a day to honor and remember those who died in service to our country. After the first World War, the holiday has been known as Memorial Day. 

Although nearly a century has passed since the end of World War I, there are still some people who died in battle who haven't been identified. Waterford resident, Robert Laplander, is hoping to change that.

Audrey Nowakowski

Memorial Day observations started early for some in Milwaukee with the official dedication of the Captain Lance P. Sijan Memorial Plaza in front of the General Mitchell International Airport on May 26th.

bfatphoto / Flickr

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

On Lake Effect, we’ve looked at various issues surrounding mental health such as trauma, substance abuse, and the need for mental health nursing and other professions to help the Milwaukee community. Many assume mental health concerns are those of grown adults, but one psychologist is encouraging parents, teachers, and caretakers how to look out for a child’s mental health.

zinkevych / Fotolia

The medical system has long separated primary health care and mental health care. And in a city like Milwaukee where there are significant obstacles for people to have good access to healthcare – one aspect of a person’s health often suffers at the expense of the other.

Mitch Teich

At the end of another intense news week, Lake Effect news analyst Charlie Sykes marvels at a fast pace cycle, which doesn't seem to slow down.

"We're living in an era," he says, "in which every day, there's a story - a revelation - that in a different world would have dominated the news for weeks in and of itself.  And yet, these are one news-cycle stories."

On Friday's Lake Effect, Sykes offered his take on several key issues that dominated the news (for a while, anyway) this week:

While Milwaukee may be considered the United States’ most segregated city, our neighbors just south of us aren’t too much better. Chicago is consistently ranked as one of the most segregated cities in the U.S., and much like Milwaukee, its history is rooted in government sanctioned racism.

For decades, racially restrictive covenants forced black Chicagoans to live in a designated area of the city known as the Black Belt. The use of these covenants was struck down by the Supreme Court in the late 1940s, but that wasn't the end of their impact.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Charles Fishman and Seth Siegel know a thing or two about water.

Fishman is author of The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water. Siegel wrote Let There Be Water: Israel’s Solution for a Water-Starved World.

They were among the 200 people interested in water issues who spent two days in Milwaukee this week. The draw was The Water Council’s 10th annual summit at which security was the theme.

Bonnie North

Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel sponsors a unique residency program for area artists. For 12 months, the selected artist sets up shop in a space off the lobby by the elevators on the first floor.

Republic of Korea / Flickr

In South Korea former president and conservative politician, Park Geun-hye, was impeached this year for abuse of power. The process to find Park's replacement culminated in the election of current president, Moon Jae-in of the Democratic Party of Korea. He won in a landslide. Lake Effect essayist, Art Cyr, has been reflecting on the recent election and what it means for the state of democracy. 

Jonathan Shoemaker / Aja-Monet/Facebook

It’s hard to encapsulate a person’s life and experiences in printed words. No matter how eloquent the writing, there will always be moments and pieces left to speculation. This was one of Aja Monet’s biggest worries when she first considered publishing her poetry.

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