Milwaukee Magazine

Courtesy of Summerfest

There’s a lot of pressure on Milwaukeeans to take advantage of the fleeting summer weather. It can be overwhelming to try to figure out how to pass a summer weekend, and for that reason, Milwaukee Magazine releases an annual guide to the city's summer schedule. It includes dates, places, and events, including some that might be off the beaten path.

Carole Nicksin, editor and publisher of the magazine, joined Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to talk about her top ten highlights for the summer ahead:

Illustration by Jason Wyatt Frederick / Milwaukee Magazine

Many of us like a good mystery.  The May issue of Milwaukee Magazine is chock-full of real-life mysteries with a decided local flair.  The magazine’s cover story relates a handful of unsolved mysteries and hidden history from around Wisconsin.

From an angry Goatman to underwater pyramids and cheese thefts, "(these stories) sort of percolated through the public consciousness for a long time," says senior editor Matt Hrodey.

Lacy Landre

Milwaukee history is inextricably linked to immigration, from the first German, French, and English immigrants who shaped the city’s founding, to Polish and Irish immigrants that helped build it into an industrial powerhouse, to the Latino immigrants that have redefined the near south side.

Sara Stathas

Buying a new home can be stressful. There are a million things to consider, but the biggest component is almost always the neighborhood.

This month Milwaukee Magazine’s cover story featured a list of neighborhoods to fit every budget, in areas throughout and around the city. Kristine Hansen is the author of the article and she spoke with Lake Effect’s Joy Powers about some of the overarching elements of the areas where people are looking to buy.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Magazine

Regular readers of Milwaukee Magazine may notice the monthly publication has been looking a bit different. A couple months ago, the magazine made some changes to both the design of the physical magazine and the content.

The changes also came with an additional title for Milwaukee Magazine Editor-in-Chief Carole Nicksin, who sat down with  Lake Effect's Mitch Teich to talk about the design changes and her additional title: Publisher.

John Sturdy

There’s a growing body of research on the importance of human-to-human contact. Studies have found that physical interactions with other people can reduce stress, improve physical health, and increase compassion.

So it may be unsurprising that more and more people are turning to professional cuddlers to improve their overall well-being.

Audrey Nowakowski

Not every story assignment turns out to be a life-affirming exercise.  Milwaukee writer Dan Simmons has written about a lot in his time here - from a doctor who treats bonobos to changes in the housing market. But Simmons’ most recent assignment for Milwaukee Magazine turned out to form a connection for which he says he will always be grateful.

Courtesy of HGA

The Milwaukee RiverWalk, as it is now, is a little more than two decades old. A story in this month's Milwaukee Magazine contends it has generally been a successful project, starting in the 1980s.

Kevin Mueller, author of the article, talks to Lake Effect's Mitch Teich about the origins of the Milwaukee RiverWalk Project and how it's continuing to progress. 

Mike Miller Images

The relationship between food and love is the basis of many platitudes. And for the couples featured in this month’s Milwaukee Magazine the cliches hold true: food and love are an inseparable pair.

In honor of Valentine’s Day, the February edition of the magazine showcased a number of couples who own and operate restaurants in Milwaukee. Chefs Lisa Kirkpatrick and Paul Zerkel makeup one of the couples featured in the magazine. 

Max Thomsen

Milwaukee's manufacturing heyday was decades ago.  Along with the decline in that part of the economy, in recent years the city has had issues fostering innovation.  A study last fall by the Public Policy Forum showed that the city ranked near the bottom every year since 2006 for the number of business start-ups.

Photo by Kenny Yoo / Milwaukee Magazine

There was a time in the 1980s and ‘90s when so-called “midnight basketball” leagues were seen as a promising tool to give young, at-risk men in high school a productive use of their time.  But after a few years, the leagues fell out of favor.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Magazine

If the January cover of Milwaukee Magazine has a particularly celebratory look to it, that's for good reason.  The magazine marks 35 years of its current iteration with a special section that looks back at highlights from the past three-and-a-half decades.

For editor Carole Nicksin, who has been with the publication for the past year-and-a-half, the deep dive into the magazine's history was revelatory - especially as it pertained to one of the key figures in that history.

Kat Schleicher

Five years ago, the Milwaukee Jewish Federation brought on a new President and CEO. Hannah Rosenthal brought impressive credentials and a strong connection to Wisconsin to her role as a leader in the 25,000 person Jewish community.

Rosenthal came to Milwaukee by way of the State Department and although a lot has changed in the atmosphere surrounding both politics and religious tolerance in Wisconsin and around the country since she started, she remains a force both within the Jewish community at large.

Kevin J. Miyazaki / PLATE

With our Brewers baseball team and a nickname paying homage to the city’s alcohol-fueled history, it should come as no surprise that Milwaukee is a big drinking town. So when the staff of Milwaukee Magazine sat down to hammer out their ultimate guide to drinking in the city, there were more than a few contentious categories.

Photo by Michael-Brosilow

Earlier this week, the Milwaukee Rep opened the 42 consecutive year of its production of A Christmas Carol. The adaptation of Charles Dickens’ holiday classic has gone through a number of changes at the Rep over the years.

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