Milwaukee Magazine

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

Restaurant critic Ann Christenson eats out a lot. That's her job, afterall. And for the cover story of this month's Milwaukee Magazine, she has pulled together some of the most noteworthy, new places to eat in the Milwaukee area. 

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At one time, the landscape of Wisconsin was full of burial mounds, the remnants of past Native American civilizations scattered around the state and the entire Midwest. There are some mounds, like Effigy Mounds National Monument in Iowa, about which a lot is known. Other mounds, like those at Aztalan State Park in Lake Mills, still have quite a lot of mystery surrounding them.

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Milwaukee Magazine publishes its yearly City Guide every summer as a way to help Milwaukeeans reacquaint themselves with the city we call home.  It’s also an in-depth guide to the summer for people who have never experienced Milwaukee in June, July and August.

Photo by Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

One of the great joys of traveling is eating. Trying out the gustatory specialties of a city, a region or even a country can introduce us to a place and its people in a very immediate way.

But most of us can’t travel as much as we’d like to. So in order to immerse ourselves in the flavors of the world, we depend on restaurants here at home. And as you might guess, some of them do really well representing their cuisines and others tend to “Americanize” their offerings.

Photo courtesy of James Sanger

Growing up, Dr. James Sanger loved wildlife and the outdoors. In college, he studied zoology. So when a urologist notified him of an orangutan with an injured hand at the zoo, Sanger happily heeded the call of the wild to help local primates.

Sanger currently serves as the plastic surgery hand surgeon at the Medical College of Wisconsin and chief of plastic surgery at the Zablocki VA Medical Center, but he has been called in as the Milwaukee County Zoo's primate hand specialist for the past 20 years.

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For our Project Milwaukee: Innovation - How Do We Compete? series, the scientific community has been highlighted for its work in both research and practice.

Surgeon James Sanger is particularly noteworthy for his work as a plastic surgeon and a hand surgeon. But his patients are noteworthy, too.

Sara Stathas / Milwaukee Magazine

Freelance writer Zach Brooke spent three days immersed in a restorative justice program at the Green Bay Correctional Institution and emerged with the article featured in this month’s Milwaukee Magazine.

Restorative justice asks crime victims to come face to face with offenders. This theory of justice assesses and tries to repair the damage that is caused by a crime, Brooke explains.

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It’s a cliché to say that homeownership is the American dream. For generations, it was a milestone that people aspired to and generally went without question. But a storyline in recent years – especially following the burst of the housing bubble in 2008 – has been the reluctance of the millennial generation to adopt that version of the American dream.

Some factors that have kept millennials out of the housing market include waiting for job prospects and security to improve, paying off debts unique to their generation (such as student loans) and overall reluctance.

Photo by Sara Stathas

The work of Andre Lee Ellis is nothing new to Lake Effect. His tireless efforts to positively influence the lives of young black men in Milwaukee have been included on Ex Fabula and in a number of feature stories on WUWM.

Photo by Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

This month's Milwaukee Magazine examines mental health issues in Wisconsin. Personal essays, one by sports journalist Trenni Kusnierek and the other by college student Molly McKenzie, are only two facets of the wide-ranging series.

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Of the many problems urban places face in the 21st Century, one that many thought was behind us was lead poisoning in children. Action figures are no longer made from the metal, lead paint was banned from use on home interiors decades ago, and even leaded gasoline that produced lead-tainted exhaust and residue has been gone from the scene for more than twenty years.

Anthony DeLorenzo / Flickr

The Midwest is now a full month into winter – and that, in turn, means we still have two full months of winter yet to come.  A bitter pill to swallow, if you’re not a fan of cold weather.

However, Milwaukee is not the kind of place where locals shrink at the thought of winter. But if your winter has gotten a bit repetitive, Milwaukee Magazine’s Dan Simmons and Howie Magner were among the forces behind the winter guide in January’s issue.

Photo by Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

Among the many charter and specialty schools in Milwaukee is one that focuses on educating one particular immigrant ethnic group.  The Hmong American Peace Academy is remarkable for that reason.

However, the K-12 charter school is also remarkable because of its leader and founder Chris Her-Xiong, herself an immigrant from Laos. She was featured in an article in this month’s Milwaukee Magazine.

POOL PHOTO

In May of 2014, people in Milwaukee – and around the country – were shocked by a brutal knife attack on a 12-year old Waukesha girl.  Their shock deepened when it was revealed that were attackers were her school peers – ostensibly, her friends.

Adam Kuban / Flickr

For some of us, it’s hard to imagine a more perfect food than pizza. 

People can be pretty choosy about what is on it and where they get it. If you’re open to trying someplace different than your normal standby, Milwaukee Magazine’s cover story features thirty of the area’s best pizza places.

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