Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Sophia Boyd / Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

All Lismari Montes, 15, had to do was find the bottle of prescribed sleeping pills that were hidden in her parent’s room. “I’m done” was all she could think as she walked upstairs to her room, yearning for escape from her exhausting fight with depression.

Anger drove her to this point. She was angry at her family and herself. “I like to think of it as a snowball,” she said. “It went from this little tiny issue … to the point where I didn’t think [it] was worth living.”

Wyatt Massey

In a two-part series on the ongoing risk of lead poisoning in Milwaukee, Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service reports on how diminished federal funding for lead-abatement efforts prompted the City to limit subsidies to six North Side ZIP codes, leaving owners of old homes in other neighborhoods scrambling for help. The series also looks at how Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers responds to elevated blood lead levels in children on the South Side. 

Photo by Allison Dikanovic / Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

The commercial sex trade industry works like any other market, with supply and demand. Experts say that a stronger emphasis on deterring people from purchasing sex in Milwaukee would address a root cause of the problem.

Martha Kuhlman looked down, feeling outside of her body. She saw herself climb into the backseat of a car in a body-hugging dress as a man promised to go get her money. Instead of cash, he returned with a knife in hand. Before tossing her out onto the curb, the man strangled the young woman until she lost consciousness.

Photo by Andrea Waxman

When Shiredon Roper and her children fled their home two months ago to escape a violent situation, they took shelter in abandoned buildings. Roper dared not sleep as she watched over her son, 15, and daughter, 10, she said.

Marlita A. Bevenue, Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

One day last May, Latoya S. was walking her 6-year-old pit bull, Gucci, when he began to snarl excitedly at a strange man standing on the front porch of her brick, two-bedroom ranch home. As Latoya approached her home, the man spoke. “You Latoya?” She nodded.

Jabril Faraj, Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Last year, the Milwaukee Common Council adopted an ordinance regulating where convicted sex offenders are and are not allowed to live within the city limits.

And while the law might give comfort to some who are concerned about whether such offenders are living in close proximity to places like schools, a report in the online Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service says we may actually, now, have less idea where offenders are living. 

Jabril Faraj / Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

The so-called recovery school district within Milwaukee Public Schools - the entity made up of a handful of struggling schools which the state put under the control of Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele - has gotten much of the attention and headlines in recent months. Abele recently appointed Mequon-Thiensville superintendent Demond Means as the part-time commissioner of the district.

But a less-heralded retreat on charter schools held by the MPS board could also usher in significant changes in the school climate here. 

Beth Cortez-Neavel / Flickr

WUWM's Project Milwaukee series last year on the issue of the incarceration rate among African-American men in Milwaukee pointed to the apparent disparities in traffic stops and other citations.  These encounters with the law often result in offenders ending up back in prison.

Photo courtesy of Devi Shastri / Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Eight years ago, Marquette University’s College of Nursing bought out a private medical practice on Milwaukee’s near north side and turned it into a neighborhood health center that primarily reached underserved women.

The Marquette Neighborhood Health Center offered pre- and post-natal care, along with delivery services provided by nurse midwives. The clinic had been struggling financially for several years, running five days a week with eighty five percent of its patients on Medicaid.

Adam Carr

If you've ever driven down Sherman Boulevard through the Sherman Park neighborhood, you've probably noticed a large, strikingly elegant building with a "for sale" sign out front.

At least one person thinks that in the right hands the former auction house could play a vital role in transforming the Sherman Park neighborhood.

Sue Vliet / milwaukeenns.org

Last week, Governor Walker announced a plan he proposes that would submit recipients of welfare programs like Medicaid and food stamps to drug testing. It's the latest in a series of reforms he and other politicians have worked to implement on programs designed to assist people living in poverty.

Seth Sawyers / Flickr

There has been a lot of effort spent in recent years to improve the dropout rate in the state’s largest school district.

frankjuarez / Flickr

The state's report cards on school and school district success came out earlier this fall. Those performance measurements look at areas including student achievement and growth, a school's success in closing performance gaps and readiness for post-secondary education.

Andrea Waxman / Milwaukee Nieghborhood News Service

The skills gap gets a lot of attention in this state. There are a lot of unemployed people here, and a lot of positions that could be filled if those people had a different set of skills.

fusion.net

The news seemingly each day this summer has been filled with reports of gun violence and its aftermath.  Fatal and non-fatal shootings get plenty of headlines, but what isn’t covered as regularly is the aftermath of that violence; how it affects the victims, their families, and the community at large.

There are also people and organizations working to make change.

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