politics

Casper Zoethout / Flickr

Nationalist political parties are on the rise in Europe. While the party platform specifics differ between countries, these radical right-wing, populist movements tend to be anti-immigration, anti-European Union and favor economic protectionism.

Unlike broader political movements like fascism and socialism, populism - on either side of the political spectrum - essentially says those in power don’t have our best interests at heart so we need to get rid of them. Many of the complaints that have surfaced about the established political order will be familiar to Americans.

Jessi Paetzke

A number of reports surfaced this week that White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus is being met with dissent in the executive office. Some White House staff members dispute that report.

What seems indisputable is that he was not always seen as a likely candidate for national political fame. 

T. Krueger / WPR

Last week, Milwaukee was one of four cities nationwide that participated in NPR's A Nation Engaged project.  The idea behind the project was to gather together citizens to ask them what they wanted the incoming Presidential administration to know about their towns and cities.

Milwaukee’s event was moderated by NPR’s National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea, who stressed the importance of events that bring reporters into the field, particularly in swing states like Wisconsin. 

fullempty / Fotolia

Since the November election, reported incidents of overt hostility towards minorities and immigrants have increased. From physical altercations to poison pen letters and internet comments, some people seem to feel emboldened by the election results to express opinions that are at best unkind and at worst racist, misogynistic or homophobic.

Michelle Maternowski

The recount of Wisconsin votes cast in the 2016 presidential election is continuing.  So far, the results that have been reported have shown little shift in the totals that yielded a margin of victory of around 22,000 votes for Republican Donald Trump.

And unless there is a major shift in the numbers to come, most of the storylines will remain true.  Among them - a seismic shift of votes in western Wisconsin along the Mississippi River.  It’s an area in which Barack Obama saw significant support in both of his election campaigns, but swung to Republican Donald Trump this year.

AmirahBreen / Wikimedia

Among the stances that led to Donald Trump's election was his hard-line attitude towards immigration. And whether or not his promises to build a wall along the Mexican border, forcibly deport millions of immigrants and halt the entry of people of Muslim faith to this country ever come true, it is likely immigration policy will change in the United States in the years to come.

BBC World Service / Flickr

The reverberations from the election of Donald Trump to the presidency are continuing to echo around Wisconsin, the country, and the world.  In fact, it seems people in other countries are having almost as many conversations about the historic 2016 election as in the United States. 

Claire Bolderson is a former BBC correspondent and now independent journalist who has covered numerous US elections and other momentous ballot issues, such as the Brexit vote earlier this year.  From London, she added her take on the election.

Oxford University Press

As happens in every election cycle, a lot of attention has been paid to national polls this year. But as many political analysts have pointed out, the polls that really affect the election come from so-called swing states, like Florida, Ohio, and Wisconsin. How did we get here?

Pool / Getty Image News

The news that Republican Donald Trump has not decided whether he’ll accept the results of next month’s Presidential election may no longer be the lead headline in campaign coverage, but it is still having reverberations in this country and abroad.

Becker / Wikimedia

If you watched this election season's first presidential debate, or any of the debates over the course of the campaign season, you may agree these events do not represent the ideal of measured, respectful political discourse. This election cycle is not unique in the direction that political debate has taken. But a Milwaukee initiative is trying to change the tone, one dinner party at a time.

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There’s been a lot of attention given – both nationally and locally – to the race for Congress in Wisconsin’s first district. The seat is currently held by the Speaker of the House, Republican Paul Ryan, and much of the attention has been focused on Ryan's primary campaign against challenger Paul Nehlen. That race has been seen as a proxy in some ways for a broader divide among Republicans over Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

It was an historic Democratic National Convention this week in Philadelphia. Presidential nominee, Hillary Rodham Clinton, took the stage last night as the first woman nominated to a major party. But the week-long event had some rough spots, with protestors and supporter of Senator Bernie Sanders interrupting speeches with boos and shouting.

Sam Greenhalgh / Flickr

It’s been a little over a month since voters in the United Kingdom passed a referendum calling for the country to withdraw from the European Union. The Brexit vote shook British politics to its core – among other things it caused rapid declines in the value of the pound and prompted seismic shifts in the two major political parties – the Conservatives and Labour.

Center for New American Media

Wisconsin was known for years as a prototypically “purple” state, with a rich tradition of political debate and a veritable pendulum of power in the Governor’s seat.  That has changed a great deal in the last six years.

Little Creek Press

This interview originally aired, March 24, 2016. 

Former Democratic State Senator Tim Cullen has had a close-up view of Wisconsin politics for a longtime. The Janesville native worked in politics for many years.

Originally, Cullen had hoped to become a high school social studies teacher, but once he started working for former Congressman Les Aspen, he found himself drawn to politics. After jobs ranging from congressional staff to State Senate Majority Leader to Republican Governor Tommy Thompson's cabinet, Cullen worked outside of politics for 20 years.

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