Psychiatry

Alex_Po / Fotolia

The model most of us think of when we think of psychiatry involves a psychiatrist, a patient, a couch and often - prescriptions. And that is not too far from reality. But there are some in the field who are looking to change the paradigm and add alternative or complementary treatments.

One World Publications

It used to be that medicine was carried out with a certain degree of secrecy. We turned our health over to the experts and they prescribed what was right for us.

However, more recently patients are demanding doctors who are better communicators. And the Internet age has accelerated that trend - we have more insight into medicine than ever. 

Ann-Elise Henzl

A mismatch between the supply of psychiatrists and patient demand is causing long wait times for appointments.

One of the main reasons there aren't enough psychiatrists to go around is the sheer volume of patients, according to Pete Carlson. He's head of Behavioral Health for Aurora Health Care.

Carlson says mental health parity laws and the Affordable Care Act have opened the door.

"We have so many more people that have coverage. There's been some improvement in really destigmatizing mental health care, so more people are accessing services," Carlson says.

Photo courtesy of Barnes & Noble

Dr. Barry Blackwell has spent half a century working as a psychiatrist. But since moving from Britain to Milwaukee decades ago, he’s explored something quite unexpected for a medical practitioner: poetry.

For Blackwell, this wasn’t a midlife change-of-heart. Throughout his self-published memoir, Bits and Pieces of a Psychiatrist’s Life, Blackwell makes reference to his lifelong interest in writing. He recently sat down with WUWM’s Lake Effect to discuss his 600-page magnum opus.