Race

Teran Powell

Milwaukee has launched a new effort focused on improving the life outcomes of African-American men and boys. The program, called Rumble Young Man, Rumble, kicked off at City Hall Monday.

It's a project created by the national group Campaign for Black Male Achievement.

Leaders from the organization and the city say black men and boys are constantly in a “fight” to exist in the spaces they occupy in society. This program looks for ways to support them in those battles.

Darklens Photography

Theo Wilson did not imagine his curiosity would find him leading a national conversation about race in the United States.  The rapper, actor, and slam poetry contest winner simply wanted to know more about why people in the alt-right movement thought and felt the way they did.

So, Wilson assumed an online white supremacist persona called “Lucius25” and spent about six months interacting with people on those forums. And he learned a lot, not just about them, but about himself and his own echo-chamber.

One local blogger is taking an interesting twist on Black History Month. 

Cree Myles is curating Black Like We Never Left, in which she asks Milwaukee women artists of color to reinterpret and celebrate pieces by nationally-known women artists of color who’ve come before them.

The visual arts component of the project is currently up at CannedBeatz Art Space on the city's south side. 

Photo courtesy of WisconsinEye

At the first State of Black and Brown Wisconsin address in Madison Monday, members of the Black and Latino Caucus focused on the racial disparities that continue to challenge the advancement of people of color in the state.

The lawmakers highlighted disparities in housing, education, health and employment.

One of the participants was Milwaukee state Sen. LaTonya Johnson. She shared statistics that illustrate disparities in education between black and brown children, versus white children.

American Jewish Historical Society, New York, NY and Boston, MA

More than 50 years removed from the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, a new Milwaukee exhibit is shining a light on the collaborative efforts of two groups in the struggle.

The Jewish Museum Milwaukee’s exhibit Allied in the Fight: Jews, Blacks and the Struggle for Civil Rights examines the relationship between Jewish and African-American people - both nationally and in Milwaukee itself.

Milwaukee Teachers' Education Association

By several key measures, Wisconsin’s black-white disparities in education are the highest in the country. Last year, the state Department of Public Instruction crafted a plan to cut the achievement gap in half. It’s a plan that was required under federal education policy.

Marti Mikkelson

Many African-American men in Milwaukee face a number of challenges, including unemployment, poverty and mass incarceration. But, a two-day summit that’s underway is helping black teens and boys overcome some of those barriers. Several young people we spoke with talked about the hurdles they face.

Aisha Turner

This week’s Bubbler Talk is rooted deep in Wisconsin history... in the story of escaped slave Joshua Glover. Glover fled Missouri for Wisconsin in 1852 and was imprisoned in Milwaukee under the Fugitive Slave Law.

You can see parts of his story driving on Fond du Lac towards Milwaukee’s downtown. A large mural spans the walls of the I-43 underpass. It depicts abolitionists storming the jail, helping Glover escape to freedom in Canada.

It seemed like the controversy involving NFL players kneeling during the national anthem had died down a bit — that is until President Trump stirred up a hornet's nest Friday night during a campaign trip to Alabama.

Trump unleashed a tirade of strong comments against NFL players who don't stand during the playing of "The Star Spangled Banner."

Updated at 5 p.m. ET Sunday

Editor's note: This story contains language that some might find offensive.

Aisha Turner

Mothers Against Gun Violence organized an event Friday to bring attention to the importance of life insurance.

I believe I can fly… I believe I can touch the sky…

 

Debra Fifer raised her right hand in praise as Marshé Whaley belted into the microphone…

 

I think about it every night and day… spread my wings and fly away… I believe I can soar… see me running through that open door…

 

WTMJ-TV, Wisconsin Historical Society, and UW-Milwaukee Libraries

It was 50 years ago that the open housing marches began in Milwaukee. For 200 nights civil rights activists marched from the mostly black northside over the 16th Street Bridge to city’s predominately white southside. They demanded a law to end discriminatory housing practices that prevented African Americans from living in white areas of the city.

 

A teenager named Prentice McKinney was at the center of those marches, leading the NAACP Youth Commandos.

Kevin Winter / Getty Images

The Academy Awards are known for glitz, glamour and stars on parade. And occasionally, the movie or star that should win in their category, does. But this year, the academy is also in the news for what many have said is a distinct lack of diversity, both in the academy itself and in the movies and performances it chose to nominate.

Movie critic Duane Dudek has a thing or two to say about the controversy, but first he shares his Oscar picks:

Best Picture: Spotlight

ThinkStock

A recent report named Wisconsin as the worst state for the welfare of black children.

Richard Hoe Lawrence

Reports that Wisconsin has the country's highest rate of incarcerating black men have sparked outrage and concern - including worries over how those statistics might be used to portray the state's black men. But it turns out these concerns are almost as old as the state itself.

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