recall

A secretive John Doe investigation has reportedly been opened into a variety of allegations involving state government.

A new report from the government watchdog organization, Wisconsin Democracy Campaign says 15 recall races in 2011 and this year cost $137 million. More than $80 million was spent on the effort to recall Governor Scott Walker. Money spent on the governor's race was more than twice as much as the $37.4 million spent in Waker's 2010 campaign.Walker won a recall election versus Tom Barrett. Three Republican senators were removed from office, giving Democrats a 17-16 majority.

ljlandre, via Flickr

The latest round of Wisconsin recall elections – including the gubernatorial race - took place three weeks ago today.  They’re all history now, aside from the recall recount playing out in Racine County for the state senate seat apparently won by Democrat John Lehman.

Ed Makowski

Wisconsin residents have voted to keep Republican Gov. Scott Walker in office. Walker defeated Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in Tuesday’s recall election by 6 percentage points. As WUWM’s Erin Toner reports, Walker told his supporters it is time to leave a year of division behind.

The State Capitol was filled with mixed feelings Wednesday, in the wake of Gov. Walker’s recall victory. Walker handily defeated Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, while it appears Democrats have flipped the Senate. Unofficial results show John Lehman defeating Incumbent Sen. Van Wanggaard in the Racine County recall race. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson visited the Capitol to gauge the temperature.

Tuesday is the big day. Voters across Wisconsin will head to the polls to decide whether Gov. Scott Walker keeps his job. As WUWM’s LaToya Dennis reports, Wisconsin eyes won’t be the only ones riveted on the results. If the tens of millions of dollars groups have pumped into Wisconsin are not enough to prove how significant the recall race is, maybe this did the trick…

The number of Wisconsin residents requesting absentee ballots or voting absentee in the June 5 recall election is nearly three times higher than during the May 8 recall primary.

According to the Government Accountability Board, more than 182,000 residents have requested absentee ballots as of noon Friday. During the May primary, clerks tracked 68,000 absentee ballots.

Diners Talk Recall Politics

May 29, 2012

There does not appear to be much indecision among Wisconsin voters, about whether they think Scott Walker should remain governor. The latest Marquette Law School Poll estimates that 97 percent of potential voters know whether they will pick the incumbent or Tom Barrett in next week’s recall election.

WUWM reporters visited several diners about town where customers discuss issues of the day, and we found many establishments filled with like-minded voters.

There will likely be primary elections in recall races targeting Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch, and four GOP state senators.

The Republican Party of Wisconsin says it has lined up “fake” Democrats to run in primaries, against the real Democrats who hope to challenge the six Republican incumbents.

The fake Democrats, like genuine candidates, will need to obtain enough valid signatures to get on the ballot. The Republican party says it would not spend money on the fake Democrats’ campaigns.

The party says the move is meant to force primaries in the race, thus creating firm dates for upcoming recall elections.

It will soon be relatively easy to learn who signed the recall petitions against Gov. Scott Walker and four Republican state senators.

On Wednesday, two Tea Party groups plan to activate the searchable online database they’ve created.

Hundreds of people celebrated on the streets of downtown Madison Tuesday, as a truck full of petitions aimed at recalling Gov. Scott Walker pulled up to the Governmental Accountability Board office. Volunteers carried dozens of boxes into the building as organizers claimed they’ve collected more than one million signatures to force an election. The recall effort began last year in response to Walker’s push to end most collective bargaining rights for public unions. As WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, election officials now have their work cut out for them.

While WUWM is spending the week exploring Wisconsin’s political climate in our series, Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval, the state elections chief came to town. Government Accountability Board Executive Director Kevin Kennedy spoke to reporters Wednesday at the Milwaukee Press Club. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson had an opportunity to question him about this unprecedented year of recalls and new voting rules.

We now continue Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval. All week, we’re exploring the impact of Wisconsin’s divisive political climate this year, mixed with a tough economy. Tuesday, we reported on some winners of the new Republican majority’s agenda, including business interests and social conservatives.

Today, we focus on entities that lost ground, the biggest – public workers. Gov. Walker’s budget required them to pay more for their health insurance and pensions, in order to ease the state deficit. The GOP went one step further in 2011, by stripping most public unions of all rights except to bargain for limited wage increases. As WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, angered public workers are now part of a massive effort to recall the governor.

After months of planning, the major groups hoping to recall Republican Gov. Scott Walker kicked off their efforts overnight.

The state Democratic party and the group United Wisconsin held events around the state to distribute recall petitions and collect the first signatures.

WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl stopped in at one of the gatherings, and joined Bob Bach in the studio for this conversation.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

While Democrats move into recall petition mode Tuesday, WUWM’s Erin Toner spoke with a few of Governor Walker’s supporters. They defend the Republican leader’s record and vow to fight the recall attempt against him.

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