refugees

Frank Miller

At last count, the Civil War in Syria has displaced more than 5 million people. Most have fled to neighboring countries like Egypt and Turkey, while others have made their way to European nations in an effort to escape the escalating violence in their home country.

Here in the U.S., the Trump administration has tried to ban Syrian refugees from entering the country. So far, those efforts have failed and people from the beleaguered nation have continued to resettle in the U.S. - like the Hamdoun Family who emigrated to Milwaukee this past September.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

It is an uncertain time to be a refugee trying to come to the United States. It’s an equally uncertain time for those who have made it their life’s work to resettle refugees in the U.S.

Mary Flynn is the program director of Refugee & Immigrant Services at Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin and Upper Michigan. Since 1974, the organization has resettled more than 10,000 refugees from 15 countries.

David Sherman

Whether it's the travel ban or the temporary suspension of refugee admissions, immigration issues are at the forefront these days. As the United States and the world grapple with refugees from Africa and the Middle East, in the 1930s and '40s, the international community needed to respond to the increasing number of European Jews fleeing Nazi Germany.  

Shana Davis

A Shorewood couple spent part of August volunteering at a refugee camp in Greece, and sharing their story – and the stories of the refugees -- with everyone back home, day by day, on social media.

It's become known as a "volunteer vacation." People plan trips to far away places around volunteer opportunities. Shana and Todd Davis did just that. They planned a summer trip to Greece around the opportunity to serve at a refugee camp. Shana began documenting their trip as soon as they arrived.

Photo courtesy of Paul Calhoun

From Hungary closing its borders to fleeing Syrians or talk of building a wall between the US and Mexico, it’s sometimes hard to find any good news about refugees and their stories.

A new art project in Milwaukee, called We Are Here, hopes to show and tell the stories of local high school students who are also refugees.

Julien Harneis / Flickr

Immigration will likely be a major issue for debate during the general election campaign this fall, with one presumptive nominee running on limiting Muslim immigration and constructing a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. And while we continue our internal dialogue about the issue here in the United States, the refugee crisis in Europe and in the Middle East is getting worse. Hundreds of thousands of people are still in need of shelter.

With the news that one of the Paris attackers may have entered Europe posing as a refugee from Syria, more than half of American governors are now objecting to Syrian refugees being resettled in their states. On Tuesday, White House officials hosted a call with 34 governors to better explain current security screening measures. And this week, some members of Congress have called on the Obama administration to stop or at least pause the resettlement program until refugees can be properly vetted.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Governor Walker has instructed his administration not to resettle refugees from Syria. The order comes Tuesday, following a letter he sent to President Obama, asking  him not to relocate Syrian refugees in Wisconsin. Otherwise, Walker says, he will do what he can to make sure they don't stay here.

Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images

Doctor Adel Korkor was born and raised in Syria but came to the U.S. several decades ago to continue his medical training. He makes Milwaukee his home. Korkor says he often tries to tune out the news about Syria's civil war - the thousands it's killing, the many it has turned into refugees fleeing toward Europe and perhaps its narrowing door, but he can’t stop thinking about his homeland.

Ann-Elise Henzl

By September, Wisconsin will have 990 new residents who’ve come here as refugees. They’re among 70,000 the nation is welcoming this federal fiscal year.

Refugees have been settling in Wisconsin for more than a century, so systems are in place to meet their needs, such as housing and food. Some need mental health help, as well.

Ann-Elise Henzl

Thousands rallied in Washington last week, urging Congress to create a path to citizenship, for undocumented immigrants.

Meanwhile, the U.S. continues to welcome a different set of people from other countries: refugees. They’ve fled their native lands, to escape persecution.

This year, the U.S. government will welcome 70,000 refugees. About 1,000 will head to Wisconsin.