Research

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Every time you post to Twitter or Facebook, these sites are collecting data about you. At this point you ought to expect that by participating in social media sites, you’re giving up some of your privacy. It’s just the name of the game.

Some see big data from social media sites as a god send for researchers - a perfect way to study social habits with huge numbers of people. But what happens when that data with your personal details still attached is published for a study, for the world to see?

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A Marquette University researcher hopes his work could be a promising step towards a cure for spinal cord injuries and the paralysis they cause.

Dr. Murray Blackmore turned to an unlikely ally in his work - cancer genes.

bioforward.org

A report out this week offers a snapshot of an increasingly important sector of the Wisconsin economy. 

The report quantifies the economic output of the state’s bioscience sector, and how it relates to other Wisconsin industries. 

The report was commissioned by BioForward, the trade association for the bioscience industry.  It was released Wednesday, at the group’s Bioscience Summit in Madison. 

Miguelángel Guédez / Flickr

The brain is a funny thing. You could be listening to your favorite radio show, say, when something catches your eye. Before you realize it, your mind has wandered and you've lost track of what you were just listening to.

UW-Milwaukee researcher Debbie Hannula studies the very real impact of this phenomenon. In fact, Hannula, who is a professor of psychology at UWM, received a grant from the National Science Foundation to examine how memory affects your attention.

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You were probably warned as a child to never combine water and electricity. The list of things not to do was impressive – don’t walk outside in a lightning storm, don’t plug in a hair dryer over a sink full of water. Essentially we were told some variation of "keep them far, far apart."

Well, Brooke Mayer didn’t get that message. Or if she did, she ignored it.

Richard Wheeler

Actress Angelina Jolie announced yesterday that she’s had a preventive double mastectomy after learning that she carries a genetic mutation that puts her at high risk for developing breast cancer.

That announcement has, for many, rekindled a dilemma about how much information we want to know about our genome, and what do with that information once it’s in hand.