Science

Africa Studio / Fotolia

When it comes to studying the origins of humans, we naturally rely a lot on the fossil record.  And fossils, well, they teach us pretty much everything we need to know about our ancestors, right?

When you sleep in unfamiliar surroundings, only half your brain is getting a good night's rest.

"The left side seems to be more awake than the right side," says Yuka Sasaki, an associate professor of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University.

Ballantine Books

The gulf between science and football might seem like a large one, but scientist and author Ainissa Ramirez would say they're more alike than you might imagine. Her latest book, Newton’s Football: The Science Behind America’s Gamelooks at the similarities between scientists and football fans.

Daniele Giannotti / Flickr

A recent study published in Nature found that by pounding vegetables and cutting meat, early humans saved hours of chewing time every day. In fact, our ancestors saved more than 2.5 million chews every year through these simple methods of processing food.

How researchers came to this conclusion is another story entirely. Subjects were enticed to join the study with a sign that simply read, “Chew for Science.”

There's lots of evidence that getting too little sleep is associated with overeating and an increased body weight.

The question is, why? Part of the answer seems to be that skimping on sleep can disrupt our circadian rhythms. Lack of sleep can also alter hunger and satiety hormones.

Henze/NASA / ligo.caltech.edu

News of the discovery of gravitational waves dominated the news a couple of weeks ago, and UWM scientists were among those who played a large role in that discovery.

Our astronomy contributor and the director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium, Jean Creighton, was not only excited about the discovery for its scientific importance, but also personal significance.

ardithelionheart@ymail.com / Flickr

What do two black holes sound like when they collide? Not much. But just detecting it is the first step in unlocking some of the biggest mysteries of our universe.

A century ago, Albert Einstein predicted the presence of gravitational waves - ripples in spacetime created by catastrophic events. Yesterday, researchers from UWM and around the world confirmed their existence with the help of LIGO, a gravitational wave detector that senses those ripples as they pass.

We all know about California’s Silicon Valley. A bunch of rockstar tech entrepreneurs who are changing the world through their innovations.

Throughout human history, there have been pockets in time and specific places that make a real impact on the way we live. Ancient Athens was home to geniuses like Plato and Socrates, whose contributions to philosophy changed the way the world thought. The Renaissance in Italy and Northern Europe created some of the greatest artists and innovators of all time.

Paul Sereno is proof that the dinosaurs don’t need to be alive for the adventure to be real.

Sereno is a paleontologist, National Geographic explorer-in-residence, and professor at the University of Chicago.  He’s also discovered several new species of dinosaur in places like Mongolia, Morocco, and Niger.

NASA, ESA and G. Bacon / Flickr

It’s always exciting when new scientific discoveries are announced. It’s even exciting to talk about scientific discoveries that aren't yet confirmed. Such is the case for the potential ninth planet that astronomers have been theorizing about based on observations of the solar system.

Alper Çuğun / Flickr

The last week of the year offers a good chance to look back at some of the stories that made news over the past 12 months. In the area of science, it seemed, at least to us lay people, like an unusually busy year for big developments in a variety of areas. The editors of Waukesha-based Discover can confirm that suspicion.

The magazine's January/February issue recaps the top 100 science stories of the year, and there are some that will undoubtedly be talked about for years to come.

Ray Cross / Flickr

For many of us, scientific curiosity extends beyond human biology. It’s for those people that the Wisconsin Science Festival is an exciting date on the calendar.

The 4th annual statewide festival opens Thursday and runs through Sunday with events ranging from the art and science of video games to the science of Manhattans. Director of the Wisconsin Science Festival  Laura Heisler says the event is focused "on anyone who has any curiosity at all." 

IceCube/NSF

The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita of the University of Tokyo, and Arthur B. McDonald of Queen’s University in Canada for the discovery that neutrinos have mass.

Neutrinos are basically particles of blue light that act as cosmic messengers from some of the most powerful processes in the universe, such as black holes and gamma-ray burst explosions.

Dave Schumaker / Flickr

Three earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater have shook parts of the American west in the last month, and several temblors hit Jamaica as well. However, those events were relatively mild compared to the recent spate of major earthquakes in places like Japan and the Afghanistan-Pakistan quake that has left hundreds dead.

Scott Sampson, Facebook

If you’re under age 10 or the parent of someone who is, the name “Doctor Scott” is likely a name you’ll associate with science.

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