Slender Man

One of two Milwaukee-area girls charged in the 2014 attempted murder of a classmate to impress a fictional horror character known as "Slender Man" was sentenced Thursday to 25 years in a mental hospital.

Anissa Weier, 16, had pleaded guilty in August to being a party to attempted second-degree homicide. However, a jury agreed in September with her claim that she was not responsible for her actions because of mental illness.

Michael Sears / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Morgan Geyser is pleading guilty in the "Slender Man" stabbing of a classmate, in a deal that will allow her to not be sentenced to prison. Instead, Geyser will be committed in a mental hospital.

The plea agreement was announced on Friday. Under the deal, doctors will evaluate Geyser, then advise a judge on how long they believe the teen should remain in treatment.

Geyser had been set to go on trial next month on attempted homicide charges. She previously pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

After a full day of deliberations, which lasted until late Friday night, a jury in Waukesha County found that Anissa Weier was mentally ill when she and a friend attacked another girl, leaving her to die in the woods. All three girls were 12 years old at the time of the stabbing, three years ago. The victim was able to find help, and survived.

Weier and Morgan Geyser said they planned the stabbing in order to please the internet horror character Slender Man. Attorneys for Weier argued that she believed Slender Man would harm her family if she did not attack her classmate.

The first of two Slender Man trials is underway. Opening statements were heard in Waukesha County Tuesday. Anissa Weier, last month, pleaded guilty to second degree intentional homicide with a deadly weapon. Three years ago, she and Morgan Geyser were 12 years old, when they stabbed a friend multiple times, leaving her for dead in a park in Waukesha. The girls said they were trying to please the fictional horror character Slender Man. The victim survived. The jury is being asked to decide whether Weier is legally responsible -- or if her actions were caused by mental illness.

POOL PHOTO

Monday marked the beginning of a trial for a case that captured national attention a few years ago. Anissa Weier and Morgan Geyser were both 12-years-old when they allegedly stabbed a fellow classmate 19 times and left her to die in a park in Waukesha. The injured girl was able to find help and survived. Weier and Geyser were said to be trying to please the internet horror character Slender Man. The girls, who are now 15-years-old, are being charged in adult court.

POOL PHOTO

In May of 2014, people in Milwaukee – and around the country – were shocked by a brutal knife attack on a 12-year old Waukesha girl.  Their shock deepened when it was revealed that were attackers were her school peers – ostensibly, her friends.

Pool Photo

A judge in Waukesha says two girls accused of trying to kill a classmate to impress the online horror character Slender Man will remain in adult court.

Morgan Geyser and Anissa Weier were 12 years old in May of 2014 when they allegedly lured their 12 year old friend into the woods and stabbed her 19 times. The victim survived.

The suspects were charged with attempted first-degree intentional homicide at the time of the incident, automatically placing them in adult court under state law.

When a girl was stabbed 19 times in a Waukesha park last May, the suspects were 12 years old, so under state law, they head directly to adult court. The judge will decide whether they belong there or in juvenile court.

The girls told police they stabbed a classmate to please a fictitious character named Slender Man. The victim survived.

Wisconsin changed its juvenile code in the 1990s, lowering the age at which a defendant goes to adult court, from 18 to 17. Former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Janine Geske says attitudes had changed.

Jon Strelecki

That question came to the forefront here in Wisconsin with the recent Slender Man case.

Two young Waukesha girls acted out a fantasy and attacked and severely injured a classmate.

On this edition of UWM Today, host Tom Luljak talks to Tina Freiburger, an expert in criminal justice, about the troubling situation of very young children facing serious charges that will stay with them the rest of their lives.

Waukesha Judge Michael Bohren decided the trials belong in adult court, even though the girls were 12 at the time they allegedly stabbed a friend.

A judge decided Friday that the girl is not mentally able to stand trial. She and another 12-year-old are accused of stabbing a classmate.

Several doctors have concluded that at least one of the two 12-year-old girls accused of stabbing a friend 19 times, is not mentally competent.

Wisconsin Court System

A court commissioner has ordered a competency evaluation for one of the two Waukesha girls accused in the stabbing of a classmate.

By age 8, most children know the difference between fantasy and reality, according to Communication Arts Professor emerita Joanne Cantor.

Marti Mikkelson

People who live in Waukesha are taken aback by the disturbing crime that occurred in their community. 

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