technology

MealSteals

With the abundance of Yelp - and other - reviews on the Internet, it can take a lot of time and research to figure out where to grab Sunday brunch or drinks with friends. 

A new app created by Milwaukeeans Ben Bourgeois and Brian Kopp, aims to make this dining decision-making process easier. Called “MealSteals,” the app points users to local restaurants and bars based on their current discount offerings. 

iconimage / Fotolia

Every time you post to Twitter or Facebook, these sites are collecting data about you. At this point you ought to expect that by participating in social media sites, you’re giving up some of your privacy. It’s just the name of the game.

Some see big data from social media sites as a god send for researchers - a perfect way to study social habits with huge numbers of people. But what happens when that data with your personal details still attached is published for a study, for the world to see?

BestForYou / Fotolia

The holidays are often a time for giving and receiving long-awaited gifts. How many times has a plea for something new ended with, “Well, if you’re good, maybe Santa will bring it?” So it’s no wonder that many teens are hoping December will bring a new cell phone, table, or even a gaming system. But as the capabilities of these devices has increased, so too has the need to set some boundaries around these connected gadgets.

Jandrie Lombard / Fotolia

In today’s technology-immersed world, how much technology is too much for a growing child? Outside of the computers and tablets they may use in school, much of a typical kid’s social or entertainment time these days might be of the electronic variety.

Sergey Nivens / Fotolia

Smartphones are everywhere in our lives today. It often takes an extraordinary set of circumstances for us not to be connected in multiple ways with the wider world, whether we're checking our email on an airplane or surfing the web before shutting off the light and going to sleep.

Susan Bence

For decades at this time each summer, Wisconsin farmers have gathered to talk technology. Wisconsin Farm Technology Days began back in 1954 with a simple hay baling contest in Waupaca County.

This week a farmer south of Geneva Lake hosted.

Kyle Scott came to check it out. He works for a crop farmer northeast of here. He and his wife also farm their own five-acre parcel.

Michelle Maternowski

Strong internet connections can play a huge role these days in the economic viability of an area.  As growing numbers of devices and systems are being connected to the internet, cities across the country are looking to keep up with what’s called the Internet of Things, or IOT. Milwaukee is no different.

The city is in the early stages of examining what it means to be a "Smart City," or a city that uses technology and the internet to enhance performance.

The City of Milwaukee is ready using smart technology connected to the internet to improve lives and services.

Courtesy of ONKÖL

What would you do without the internet? These days, it’s probably hard to imagine being unconnected, right? Well, it might only be the beginning. Depending on the study, it’s estimated that by the year 2020, up to 100 billion devices could be connected to the internet. The movement is called the “Internet of Things” and  some local companies are part of the wave.

The general concept behind the Internet of Things, or IoT, is pretty basic.

The Johnson Controls name is one of the most iconic brands in Milwaukee today. Their products, high-tech batteries and temperature regulators like thermostats, are leaders in their industries. But if things had gone differently, the company could have been just as well-known in a different industry.

Today employees at Johnson Controls headquarters in Glendale pass a little piece of that history every day as they walk one of the corridors on the campus: a 1910 Johnson Empress sedan. 

Kaspars Grinvalds / Fotolia

There are probably still a few cars on the road that have only a radio, or perhaps even a cassette deck. However nowadays, it's kind of a throwback to even find a CD player in some newer models.

Electronics are a huge deal in the cars of the 21st century, from the way the engines themselves are controlled, to how drivers and passengers are kept safe and how they’re entertained.

Morgan / Flickr

The White House issued its first-ever college scorecard this week.  It’s a website designed to help people compare costs and offerings across all the public and private colleges and universities in the country.  It’s a tool that its designers hope will be useful in connecting schools with their future students.

Penguin Random House

Computers today are doing things that we thought were impossible, even just a few years ago.  They're doing everything from study legal briefs to driving cars, to vacuuming the house.  And that has society edging toward a tipping point.

"We've reached a point where the technology is now so advanced that it is eliminating jobs faster than it's creating new ones. That has never happened before," says Fortune magazine's senior editor at large Geoff Colvin

stevenkotler.com

It’s probably safe to say that fans of science fiction are fans of technology. From Star Trek or Doctor Who to the novels of Isaac Azimov or Ernest Cline, technology plays a major role. Usually the capabilities described in those books or TV series are far more advanced than anything we currently use or could even imagine.

However, reality has been rapidly catching up with fiction over the past 20 years, and along with it have come ethical and moral questions only confronted in fictional worlds.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A lab at UW-Milwaukee began creating 3D-printed hands after a girl asked for one for Christmas.

The girl is Shea Stollenwerk of Mukwonago, who’s now in fourth grade. She was born with one fully-formed hand, and one with no fingers.

Shea’s mom Ranee says Shea learned to do just about everything, without wanting an artificial hand. Then she changed her mind about a year and a half ago, after discovering a YouTube video of a boy using a 3D printed prosthetic hand.

SamsungTomorrow / Flickr

The holidays have just passed, and if you're already bored with that tablet or new phone you got for Christmas, you can​ take some solace in what's happening this week in Las Vegas. The annual Consumer Electronics Show is underway and gives the world a glimpse at what might be on wish lists next year, or the year after that.

Pages