theater

Hear What's in the Heart / youtube.com

Steve Scionti’s “Hear What’s in the Heart: An Italian Shoemaker's Tale,” is a one-man exploration of the Italian-American experience. Scionti is the playwright and sole performer of the show, which documents his experiences growing up in Middletown, Connecticut.

Jeff Zmania Photo, Twitter

Danceworks’ spring performance, Secrets From the Wide Sky, takes flight Friday evening at the Danceworks Studio Theatre on Water Street. The show is a mix of original choreography, music, and the shared secrets of its performers.

Danceworks’ Artistic Director Dani Kuepper explains more about the show, which originated with company founder Sarah Wilbur’s idea of a wide sky performance:

Michael Brosilow

Wisconsin native Thornton Wilder's Our Town is an iconic and Pulitzer-prize winning piece of American theatre. In the 80 years since it was first produced, there have been innumerable productions from grade school to Broadway.

courtesy of First Stage

Antarctica, WI. It's not an actual place. But it is a play about Milwaukee, about its divisions and its places of connection, and about a group of teenagers trying to navigate their world and hopefully make it better.

Renaissance Theaterworks

Sometimes it feels like nothing really changes. The same battles seem to come around to be fought again and each generation thinks, "Wait a minute, I thought we settled this one..."

So for Renaissance Theaterworks to stage British playwright Caryl Churchill's 1982 play, Top Girls, now seems fitting. Many of the play's themes - the price women pay to have both families and careers, the definition of success for women - are still relevant today, 36 years after its first production.

Cirque du Soleil

Thursday through Sunday, the BMO Harris Bradley Center will be taken over by the magic of Montreal's Cirque du Soleil. A number of Cirque shows have been here before, but this is the first time the troupe is bringing Corteo to Milwaukee.

Like all of Cirque's shows, Corteo is both a story and a spectacle of precision acrobatics, beautiful music, and dramatic lighting and costumes.

Theatre Gigante

Most of us know the story of Tarzan, the boy raised by apes in the jungle.  We also know about the object of his affection - the woman called Jane. A play getting its U.S. premiere in Milwaukee starts with those well-known characters, but rapidly veers into uncharted territory.

Photo by Mark Frohna

Offenbach’s operetta The Tales of Hoffmann is a classic. It’s the story of the poet Hoffmann, his quest to find true love, and his three ill-fated love affairs. In its full glory, the original lasts well over three hours, requires a couple of dozen singers, and, in true operatic fashion, various characters die after singing.

Paul Ruffolo

The Milwaukee Chamber Theatre's production of Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play The Brothers Size tells the story of two brothers trying hard to find, or cling to, their paths in life.

Michael Brosilow

Immigration is a hot-button topic, but it is not a new hot-button topic. From the time the first Europeans displaced the indigenous peoples in this hemisphere (and probably even before that), who was welcome to make their home here has always been up for heated debate.

Jeremy Daniel

Will Ray can thank his mother, and a bet, for his career. The Kenosha native is currently starring as J.M. Barrie, the author of the original Peter Pan, in the National Broadway Touring Company production of Finding Neverland.

Mark Frohna

The 1950s kicked off what was known as “the Space Age,” an era in which real Cold War fears were manifested in popular culture’s monsters and space aliens.

Original artwork by Ian Anastas / Cooperative Performance

Immigration, and the stories of immigrants, are front and center in this country - from the debate over the future of DACA, to the proposed border wall, no-fly lists and travel bans.  It is a challenging time to be an immigrant in this country.

Ross Zentner

According to Merriam-Webster, the first known use of the word “equivocate” was in 1590. The dictionary further states the word has a couple of meanings: To use language especially with intent to deceive, and to avoid committing oneself in what one says.

Playwright Bill Cain says there is a further meaning, that equivocation can be a way to get to the deeper truth. How we use what appears to be the language of lies to tell a more profound truth is at the core of his 2009 play of the same name.

Milwaukee Repertory Theatre

George Orwell’s Animal Farm is a book many of us studied in school. You probably learned that the play is a thinly veiled allegory, whose political animals and their actions closely resembled what led to the Russian Revolution and the beginnings of the totalitarian Soviet state.

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