transportation

Michelle Maternowski

Has your car ended up in the shop after hitting a pothole on a Milwaukee road or highway? A Washington D.C. based transportation research group says that’s happened to quite a few drivers in Milwaukee. Bad roads cost the average Milwaukee driver more than $2,000 a year.

Those costs come in the form of repairs, wrecks, wasted gas, and time spent stuck in traffic. 

Sebastian Joseph / Flickr

Starting February 29, Milwaukee County Transit System passengers will no longer be able to purchase paper tickets. From then on, bus rides can only be bought with cash or M-Cards, reloadable electronic smart cards.

M-Cards have been available for sometime, but now Milwaukee is following the lead of other cities across the country in eliminating paper tickets. According to MCTS spokesman Brendon Conway, M-Cards will make life easier for riders and the transit system alike.   

Bublr Bikes / facebook.com

A year after officially launching, the Milwaukee bike share company, Bublr Bikes, has big plans for the future. The company’s distinctive blue bicycles can be rented at 11 locations now, but the company plans on having 50 locations by the end of 2016 and around 100 locations by 2018.

"It's been very exciting," says Bublr Bikes Executive Director Kevin Hardman. "A year ago, I was the only employee of the organization, and we now have two other full-time staff and an additional nine part-time staff."

Most Assembly Republicans want Wisconsin to mete out delays statewide and not spare the massive Zoo Interchange reconstruction project in Milwaukee.

On Monday, 33 of 63 GOP representatives put their demands in a letter Monday to Gov. Walker and Republican legislative leaders. The 33, who represent rural and out-state districts, say they want to rein in spending on transportation until the state has the money but want any resulting delays to affect all corners of Wisconsin.

road construction
Marge Pitrof

State Republican leaders issued dueling press releases on Thursday, about their positions related to transportation funding in the next state budget.

Sen. Alberta Darling says will not retract her comment that Assembly leaders want to delay work on the Zoo Interchange, in order to pressure the state Senate to approve a hike in the gas tax or vehicle registration fees.

d76 / Flickr

As the fiscal year comes to a close, one of the biggest questions that remains is the fate of transportation funding.

Currently, the Wisconsin legislature has significant work to do with Governor Walker's proposed biennial budget, which plans to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for various highway projects. However, one program that this new budget affects especially are Wisconsin's transit programs. 

Bob Bach

Wisconsin transportation officials are eyeing ways to raise $750 million over the next two years. Possibilities include higher prices at the gas pump and new fees on vehicle purchases. Gov. Walker and GOP leaders have been cool to the idea of new taxes, so it’s unclear what might happen with the DOT plan.

thedigitelmyr, flickr

A referendum on November's ballot will let voters decide whether to require Wisconsin to spend all transportation revenue on transportation projects.

Jimmy Emerson, Flickr

Wisconsin may have to plug a $700 million shortfall in its next transportation budget.

Simon Forsyth / Flickr

The gas crisis of the 1970s led many Americans to start valuing fuel efficiency, and auto makers to respond. Lots of things were tried – smaller engines, smaller cars, turbos, the gear known as overdrive. But when gas prices dropped again in the ‘90s, cars – and SUVs – got bigger again.

Marti Mikkelson

With fall approaching, local lawmakers will be crafting their budgets for the coming year.

Bob Bach

The state is projecting a huge deficit in the budget that pays for highways, local roads and public transit.

During 2013, Americans took 10.7 billion trips via public transit, but bus ridership is down in some Wisconsin communities, including Milwaukee.

Photos.com

A new program is helping some Milwaukeeans who struggle to get financing get a car loan - to help them get to work.

Automobile Association image

Many of Milwaukee's poorest residents are dealing with a double-whammy when it comes to access to employment: poverty and suspended driving privileges.

Pages