UW System

Dave Reid, Flickr

Republican budget leaders say the Wisconsin Senate and Assembly will not advance the part of Gov. Walker's budget that would give the UW System independence from state oversight.

Sen. Alberta Darling and Rep. John Nygren say they also want to restore some of the $300 million Walker would cut from the system's budget, depending on new state revenue projections. The tally on tax collections should be forthcoming soon.

One method some UW System campuses will employ to help offset proposed state budget cuts and another two-year freeze on resident tuition, is to raise tuition for out-of-state students.

Several non-resident students at UWM are concerned about the impact on them, if the Legislature does not ease the funding cuts contained in Gov. Walker's proposed budget for Wisconsin.

Wandson Moreira is from Brazil and is one of 1500 students attending UWM from 80 outside countries. Moreira says he enrolled to study industrial engineering, hoping to establish a career in logistics.

beautifulcataya, flickr

In anticipation of state budget cuts, University of Wisconsin Chancellor Rebecca Blank says the flagship campus will have to eliminate approximately 400 positions and end some programs and restructure others. She specifically cites the fields of information technology, agriculture and the arts.

Gov. Walker cuts state funding for the UW System by $300 million in his two-year budget proposal. Republican leaders say they hope to reduce the cuts, particularly if state revenue increases by the end of the current fiscal year.

Troye Fox

The UW Board of Regents began a two-day meeting in Waukesha on Thursday.

They heard from UW System President Ray Cross, who told regents he’s making progress in swaying legislators, on the next two-year state budget. Cross is working to convince lawmakers not to go ahead with Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal, to strip $300 million from the system in the next two years. Cross wants a smaller cut, in addition to greater autonomy for the system.

digital_3rd_eye, Flickr

 

Wisconsin is experiencing two major political battles right now – right-to-work and higher education funding. They’re debates that largely skew down partisan lines. But one analyst says they actually have similarities that go deeper.

Adelie Freyja Annabel, Flickr

At state university campuses around Wisconsin, department heads are going into budgeting processes contemplating cuts that could be as small as five percent or as large as 20 percent – or more.

Gov. Scott Walker
Alex Wong/Getty Images

One observer says presidential hopefuls might raise the issue, thinking it could hurt Gov. Walker in polls. Another stunned that Wisconsin is talking cuts.

UWM photo

As Governor Scott Walker prepares to officially unveil his proposed budget for the coming biennium, UW-Milwaukee leaders are preparing to cope with potentially historic funding cuts.

marctasman, flickr

Gov. Walker said several times, after calling for deep funding cuts in the UW System in exchange for autonomy, that faculty might need to work more.

Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Gov. Scott Walker is again taking aim at public education.

Adelie Freyja Annabel, Flickr

UW System President Ray Cross is ordering cost-saving moves, in light of Gov. Walker's plan to cut funding for the system by 13%, while freezing tuition.

Katie Harbath, Flickr

Across the U.S., public universities are seeking less input from state leaders, on how to spend money, build and teach.

Dave Reid, Flickr

Gov. Walker says he’s giving university leaders what they’ve wanted for years.

Pres. Ray Cross wants the UW System to consider reducing the number of credits needed for graduation and the need for elective courses.

Federal appeals court wants a state response to a request, that the full court reconsider the status of Wisconsin's Voter ID law.

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