voting

Erin Toner

Update:

Wisconsin's Elections Commission is beefing up its security measures in the wake of Russian hacking attempts in the 2016 presidential election. During a meeting in Madison Monday, the commission disclosed a draft of its plan to ensure all parties involved with elections are aware of proper security measures.

DARREN HAUCK/GETTY IMAGES

The Wisconsin Elections Commission says Russians, who wanted to hack into the state voter registration database, appear to have mistakenly tried to get into state Department of Workforce Development records.

Last Friday, state elections officials said they were told by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security that the hackers targeted Wisconsin's election system, as well as systems in 20 other states. DHS said the hacking attempt was not successful.

Original post, September 22:

Update, June 20:

It appears Wisconsin will become the 28th state to begin using electronic poll books. The Wisconsin Elections Commission on Tuesday voted to have its staff develop the software and offer it to municipalities. A spokesman earlier told WUWM that the state's paper poll books and decentralized voting system likely made Wisconsin elections less appealing to Russian hackers.

The U.S. Supreme Court has once again declined to reinstate North Carolina's strict voter ID law, which was struck down last year after a court ruled it was intentionally designed to stop African-Americans from voting.

The nation's highest court refused to consider an appeal by North Carolina Republicans, NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

"Chief Justice John Roberts wrote that the court's refusal to consider an appeal did not signify an opinion on the merits of the case," Fessler says.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

UPDATE: Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has filed a request for a recount of votes in Wisconsin's presidential election.

Republican Donald Trump won Wisconsin over Democrat Hillary Clinton by about 22,000 votes. Stein got about 30,000 votes.

Stein made the request late Friday afternoon and must pay for the costs associated with the recount.

Ann-Elise Henzl

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe has an election observation mission, which sends poll watchers to election sites around the globe. The monitors take notes on goings-on at polling places and report what they see.

Christa Mueller of Germany is among the observers sent to the United States for this fall's elections. She's part of a team, which has kept an eye on election-related activities in the Midwest in the weeks leading up to Election Day.

With all the hype surrounding Tuesday's presidential election, some voters may be tempted to take a photo at the polling place to remember the occasion. For instance, a picture of their completed ballot, or perhaps a selfie with their completed ballot.

But Wisconsin has a law that says you cannot show your completed ballot to another person. So taking a selfie at the polling site is problematic, according to Reid Magney of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. He says the issue isn't so much the photo itself, but rather what people could do with it.

Rachel Morello

How can we turn out the vote? That’s one of the biggest challenges facing both political parties this election. It’s also a question some millenials want to tackle, because they’ve posted the lowest turnout rate of any demographic group over the last few elections.

Student leaders at Milwaukee’s Mount Mary University are trying to change that by “engaging” their friends – quite literally.

DESTINA, FOTOLIA

If you head to the polls Tuesday, don't just expect to see voters and election workers. Observers of all stripes also could be there, keeping an eye on the goings-on.

For months, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has been urging supporters to head to the polls to combat what he alleges is election-rigging. He renewed his claim recently at a rally in Green Bay.

"They say there's nothing going on (but) people that have died 10 years ago are still voting. Illegal immigrants are voting," Trump said.

Nothing says how hard tradition is to break than the day Americans vote — Tuesday.

It's inconvenient. Most people work on Tuesdays and polls are mostly open during business hours. They're most crowded early in the morning before people leave for work and in the early evening after work and just before they close. It's not exactly like polling places have retail hours; they're more like extended banking hours.

LaToya Dennis

So, here’s a little known fact about voting laws in Wisconsin: You can change your ballot up to three times. Few people know about the law, and even fewer take advantage.

Wisconsin has always been proud of its voting history. In fact, election officials here like to brag that the state has one of the highest rates of voter turnout across the country.

As of Monday, 465,000 people had already cast their ballot. Now, with just one week left before the election, and several days until the end of absentee voting, those people could still change their vote.

Most Millennials Avoid Elections; Showing Up in 2016 Could Decide Races

Oct 23, 2016
Alexandra Arriaga / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

Millennials get a bad rap. They’re labeled narcissistic, self-absorbed and apathetic. (Just look at their nicknames: the selfie generation, generation me, the unemployables.)

And they’re the least likely generation to turn up at the polls this November.

However, many young Americans do care about politics. They may just show it differently than their parents.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been ruffling feathers lately by suggesting there could be massive fraud at the polls on Nov. 8. Local elections officials are among the many refuting Trump's allegations and insist every voters' ballot will count.

At a campaign stop in Green Bay, Wisconsin this week, Trump said: "They even want to try to rig the election at the polling booths. And believe me, there's a lot going on."

He repeated his claim of a 'rigged' election during Wednesday's debate:

Oct. 17 update: U.S. District Judge James Peterson has signed off on the new one-page handout the state has created, to easily explain to would-be voters the process for obtaining photo identification for voting. The DOT will distribute the handout to ID applicants who visit DMV offices and also to voter advocacy groups.

Oct. 14 UPDATE: Local clerks must complete as many addresses as possible on absentee voting forms and do not need to seek the permission of the people involved.

Under a new state law, witnesses to absentee voting must record their street number, name and municipality, but thousands have left off parts of that information.

Some clerks had asked state elections officials for permission to add the missing details, but officials went one step further Friday and mandated clerks to help.

Original story, posted on October 11:

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