Wisconsin Photo ID

Rachel Morello

Tuesday's election was the first big test of Wisconsin's photo ID requirement. Neil Albrecht of the City of Milwaukee Election Commission says the rule caught some people by surprise.

"We certainly had a number of voters -- probably several hundred -- turn out, without the photo ID. Fortunately, most of them were able to retrieve it, you know, just by going home and coming back with the photo ID," Albrecht says.

Ann-Elise Henzl

When you vote on Tuesday, you're likely to see big crowds. Neil Albrecht is executive director of the City of Milwaukee Election Commission. He's projecting that 50-60 percent of all registered voters will head to the polls, which he says "is very strong for an April election."

Albrecht compares the projection to the presidential primary in 2012, when only 38 percent of registered voters cast ballots.

The high court will combine two lower court challenges, one filed by the NAACP and Voces de la Fontera, the other by the League of Women Voters.

A bill by GOP Rep. Michael Schraa would allow voters who cannot get a government ID, to sign an affidavit stating the reason, at the polls.

Two federal lawsuits head to court Monday against Wisconsin’s photo ID law for voting. A Dane County judge has blocked the law, at least temporarily.

An Assembly committee advanced just one new rule for Wisconsin voters on Monday. The change would allow people to register to vote, online.

Wisconsin's 4th District Court of Appeals has ruled that the state's photo identification requirement for voters, is constitutional.