Poem: Sylvia’s Hives

Jul 13, 2015

The husband is a frozen wing of a bird,
flesh and feather yarned to bone.
They are bones, painted rooms, and shallow
pools bodies make when they exhaust everything.

The wife manages the shepherd's pie, jarred honey
extracted from her own swarming hives, where her
bees stung him on time in the face as she curled
herself on the bed nursing her newborn son.

Poem: Magician

May 18, 2015
aquarian_insight / Flickr

I can divine these brambles.
Or these gnarled flowers at my feet.
They obscure my heels as I
float on yellow horizons.
Tip the diagonal of my arms into
the numbers of years set down like dust.
I can, you see, lead you somewhere,
over rock and highland green.
I can conjure stone from earth
to make a window to another world.
Come with me. Take the tips of my fingers.
Interlace the leaves and set down
your sword, your wand.
You have no need for all the people
who make up your mind.


Why is so much academic writing basically unreadable? Steven Pinker says the writers are cursed with too much knowledge. 



Even in an increasingly digital world, there is still a place for the printed page.  Two years ago, a group of writers and editors from around the Great Lakes region pooled their resources to found a new literary journal. 

The Great Lakes Review began in Ohio, through the efforts of Rob Jackson, but the magazine, which comes out twice a year, now encompasses editors and writers from the United States and Canada.

Writing as a Way of Thinking & Discovering

Mar 17, 2014
Damian Gadal, flickr

Writer Scott Russell Sanders is loved by many for novels and essays, many of which carry a nature theme.  But while the environment does play a significant, vital role in his books such as A Conservationist Manifesto and his latest, Divine Animal, it’s not the only issue that he writes about.

Wiki Commons image

Most of us in the US think that we, or possibly the Brits, make the best television in the world. 


Writing as healing comes first and then participants can move to writing as testimony, Mount Mary professor Ann Angel explains.