WUWM News

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Wednesday evening update:

The National Trust's presentation did not bring the Milwaukee County Task Force on the Mitchell Park Conservatory Domes any closer to its mission.  It is  "to recommend a course of action to the County Executive and County Board" on a sustainable future of the Domes.

Milwaukee County Parks Director John Dargle described the National Trust's report as "weak and vague."

Fellow task force member John Gurda suggested Milwaukee County engineers analyze the report and provide feedback at the next meeting. Its date has not yet been set.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Wisconsin was one of three states that tipped the scales for Donald Trump in the November election. But where does the Republican president stand in the dairy state now? The latest Marquette Law School poll shows 41 percent of registered voters approve of Trump’s job performance, since he took office. That’s a slightly higher number than Trump earned in the last Marquette poll. Shortly before the election, 40 percent of the state’s registered voters said they planned to support Trump.

It’s been a little more than two weeks since House Republicans unveiled their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle have lined up to blast it. Yet, Speaker Paul Ryan says the House will vote on an updated version Thursday.

Richard Termine

Can you tell me how to get to Sesame Street?

Almost anybody with a television and free time afterschool for the last 50 years has become friends with the characters on Sesame Street. About a year ago, Big Bird and the gang said goodbye to Maria, one of the most beloved neighbors on the block since the early 1970s -- and one of the first Hispanic characters on national television.

Susan Bence

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative, made of both U.S. and Canadian mayors, opposes Waukesha’s plan to draw drinking water from Lake Michigan.

For years, the City of Waukesha has been under court order to come up with a safe alternative to its radium-tainted aquifer. Last summer, the Great Lakes governors granted the city permission to use water from Lake Michigan, after a years-long and expensive permitting process.

Marti Mikkelson

Across Wisconsin, law enforcement agencies have been deciding whether or not to help enforce federal immigration rules.

For instance in Milwaukee, Police Chief Edward Flynn has said he’s not interested, but county Sheriff David Clarke is. He recently asked to participate in the federal 287(g) program, which would train deputies how to identify and detain immigrants who may be in the country illegally.

What can I do to help decrease segregation? What is being done to alleviate the problem? What can we do to change how segregated metro Milwaukee is?

During WUWM's series, Project Milwaukee: Segregation Matters, the most common questions we received from YOU regarding segregation dealt with solutions.

Solving this issue will not be easy. However, several ways to help reduce segregation in metro Milwaukee did emerge during our coverage.

ART MONTES

It can be uncomfortable to discuss race relations. Discussions may be particularly minimal, in a region as segregated as metro Milwaukee. The group Ex Fabula relies on storytelling to make inroads. It invites its fellows to share personal tales about prejudice and misunderstandings.

SHARYN MORROW, FLICKR

Hundreds of people in Wisconsin die each year from heroin or prescription painkiller overdoses. Milwaukee's city and county leaders are beginning a combined effort to curb opioid abuse. 

They believe they can accomplish more together than on their own. On Friday, the City-County Heroin, Opioid and Cocaine Task Force will hold its first meeting at City Hall.

College Possible/Twitter

There’s a lot of talk coming out of Washington these days, about what will change under the new presidential administration -- immigration, health care and international trade, to name a few. 

But many smaller programs also face imminent change – including domestic projects that rely on federal funds.

Ashley Irvin

A hearing room spilled over with people at the State Capitol Wednesday with people clambering to talk about high capacity wells. The bill allows owners of existing high capacity wells to repair them, or in an emergency replace them, - with zero DNR review. 

And if you sell your property, the high capacity well comes with it - no permitting strings attached.

Statewide, more than 13,000 high capacity wells exist. Each one can extract more than 100,000 gallons of water per day.

Micaela Martin

In Milwaukee, college basketball fans have triple the reasons to watch this weekend's start of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. Two Wisconsin teams are in the running – the Badgers and Marquette - plus Milwaukee is hosting an opening round, at the Bradley Center.

kwangmoo, flickr

A Senate committee held a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that would remove the work permit requirement for 16 and 17-year-olds in Wisconsin. Supporters of the plan say it would eliminate red tape, while opponents say they’re concerned about the teens’ safety.

Wisconsin restaurants have employed many 16 and 17-year-olds over the years, according to Ed Lump. He’s president of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association.

Andy Stenz

President Donald Trump wants to slash the federal workforce, according to the Washington Post. It reports that Trump is preparing to announce the biggest cuts in decades, believing the government employs too many people -- wasting taxpayers' money.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

When it comes to replacing the Affordable Care Act, a couple Wisconsin leaders from different parties have one thing in common. Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Republican Gov. Scott Walker both expect the GOP plan to continue to evolve before Congress votes on it.

Both of the elected officials commented on the measure Tuesday.

Pages