WUWM News

Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn To Retire

Jan 8, 2018
Teran Powell

Edward Flynn, the embattled chief of Milwaukee's Police Department, will retire from his post next month. Flynn’s current term was due to continue through January of 2020.

The Milwaukee Police Department confirmed news of Flynn's retirement Monday afternoon, after initial reports had surfaced:

alumroot

State corrections officials are busy working on plans for shuttering two troubled juvenile prisons, after Gov. Scott Walker announced the closures late last week.  The announcement came as a surprise to many.  Despite lengthy probes into alleged mistreatment of inmates -- and inmate attacks on staff -- Walker had been defending the corrections department and the facilities.

SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES

A federal judge determined on Friday that Daniel Black can pursue a claim that former Milwaukee County sheriff David Clarke made a retaliatory threat against Black on social media, which Black says was meant to deter free speech.

The claim involves an incident in January of 2017. That's when Black boarded an airplane bound for Milwaukee. As he made his way to his seat, he noticed Clarke was a fellow passenger. Black says he shook his head at Clarke, who was wearing Dallas Cowboys apparel.

Lincoln Hills
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

The state of Wisconsin is changing the way it handles some of its worst juvenile offenders. On Thursday, Gov. Walker unveiled plans to close the Lincoln Hills School for Boys and the Copper Lake School for Girls in Irma, and instead, create five smaller regional facilities scattered across the state.

Many prisoners hail from Milwaukee and the centers have been plagued by reports of abuse of inmates and correctional officers.  Advocates who have been pushing Walker to make such a move, say it's a step in the right direction, but there’s still more work to be done.

Alexey Rotanov, fotolia

Some Republican lawmakers want the federal government to lift the mandate for selling reformulated gas in southeastern Wisconsin under a bill making its way through the state Legislature. Sales of the cleaner-burning fuel were required for six counties in 1996 as part of the federal Clean Air Act.

At the time, the corridor between Milwaukee and Chicago was considered a high ozone area, and state lawmakers felt it was necessary for drivers here to use reformulated gas. Supporters of scrapping “RFG” think the requirement is obsolete, but Democrats disagree.

Amir Levy/Getty Images

Update, January 3:

The American Red Cross of Southeast Wisconsin has decided to rescind it's policy change and will continue to serve people in all of Milwaukee's zip codes at the site of disasters.

Original Story:

The American Red Cross of Southeast Wisconsin is receiving a lot of backlash over a new policy unveiled in Milwaukee that would require people in specific zip codes to come to them for help.

Teran Powell

Bullying continues to be a problem across the country. “It can cause physical damage that we see on the outside, but it can cause emotional distress which leads to things like depression, loneliness, anxiety," Clay Anton, of Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, explains.  However, there are many efforts underway to help curb bullying. Take, for example, eleven-year-old Alex Hart-Upendo from Racine.

He's is combating bullying through his business, Build-A-Bow.

For this edition of Capitol Notes, we look ahead to the big Wisconsin political stories of 2018.  JR Ross, of wispolitics.com, predicts Foxconn will top the headlines in this new year.  The state provided $3 billion in incentives for the Taiwanese company to locate here.  

WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked him if he thinks it'll be smooth sailing, now that the state and the company have signed a contract.

Ross also predicts that the governor's race, the Wisconsin U.S. Senate race and the future of House Speaker Paul Ryan will make big news in 2018. 

s / Milwaukee Public Radio

Milwaukee native Will Radler’s life mission has been to share the beauty of flowers.

Growing up on city’s north side, he poured over his grandmother’s rose catalogs. “I think I became a garden critic when I was in my single digit years,” Radler says.

His mom was an avid flower gardener. Even before he can remember she took Radler to Boerner Botanical Gardens. “My mother has a picture of me in a buggy. Do you remember buggies?” he adds with a laugh, “Yeah, I’m that old.”

For our Capitol Notes conversation today -- we examine the year in politics.  One of the biggest Wisconsin stories of 2017 was Foxconn, and the state's $3 billion incentives package for the Taiwanese company to locate here.  

Gov. Walker championed the deal, saying the huge LCD screen manufacturing plant in Racine County will transform the state's economy.  But, Democrats were skeptical and blasted the plan during the debate.

WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, why the governor pushed so hard to land Foxconn.

David Hedquist

As 2017 comes to an end, WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence reviews some of this year’s major environmental issues, from Waukesha's water deal to the Foxconn bill.

Waukesha started 2017 on a high note. After years of study and applications, the Compact Council approved the city’s request to tap into Lake Michigan to replace its radium-tainted well water.

Althouse

The year is winding down, and so is activity at the State Capitol.  Lawmakers will cease much of their work there in the next couple months, before turning their attention to the fall elections.  

WUWM's Marti Mikkelson wondered whether legislators will pass any significant bills before going their separate ways, such as a measure that would ban fetal tissue research on UW campuses or allowing the carrying of concealed weapons without a permit.

She asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com for his thoughts, as part of our Capitol Notes conversation.

Rachel Kubik

Every year at this time, we bring you stories of people in the Milwaukee area who are working to improve the community. In today’s installment of Life’s Voices, we hear from Muhibb Dyer.

The Milwaukee native is one of the founders of both the I Will Not Die Young Young Campaign, and Flood the Hood with Dreams. Both are designed to inspire inner city youth.

One of the longest-serving ministers in southeastern Wisconsin is retiring at the end of this year. The Rev. Tony Larsen will step down after more than four decades at Olympia Brown Unitarian Universalist Church in Racine.

In addition to his work within the church walls, Larsen has been a regular figure at outdoor vigils that are held for victims of homicide.

Larsen says at first, he didn't think that role would be an appropriate one.

LaToya Dennis

Across the country, tiny homes are being used in a number of ways. Some people enjoy the novelty of living in a small space; for others, the tiny houses are an answer to homelessness. A new, tiny home community in Racine is giving homeless veterans a shot at independence.

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