WUWM News

Amanda Becker

Intergenerational care brings together children and older adults who need care during the day and arranges opportunities for the two generations to mix. Advocates insist the interactions improve the quality of life for both children and seniors.

Milwaukee has two such centers – the newer St. Ann Center for Intergenerational Care on 24th and North, and the original, in St. Francis. When you walk into the original, you see a large atrium. It’s mainly a garden, complete with birds, but there are also play areas for kids, places to sit and a reading nook.

Justin W Kern

State budget talks have stalled in Madison, as has happened in the past. Wisconsin lawmakers hope to pass a two-year spending plan by June 30, but it appears unlikely.

The biggest problem the state faces is a $1 billion hole in its transportation budget; Gov. Walker and fellow Republicans who control the Legislature differ on how to plug it. The state collects money through its gas tax and vehicle registration fee. The state gas tax is 31 cents per gallon, while the registration fee is $75 per vehicle.

Monday, jury selection will begin in Milwaukee for former police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown. He fatally shot 23-year-old Sylville Smith last summer. The killing sparked two-days of violence in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

For 48 hours last August, Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood captured people’s attention across the country. What they saw on TV were images of police in riot gear, buildings burning and crowds of angry people. It followed the police killing of a young black man. A few days later, we spoke with community activist Camille Mays.

White House

Vice President Mike Pence made his remarks on Saturday afternoon, alongside Gov. Scott Walker and before a few dozen seated guests at Direct Supply - a medical supply company on Milwaukee's northwest side. Pence called President Trump a builder and praised him as, “a fighter and a winner” for rolling back red tape, withdrawing from the Paris climate control accord and for focusing on job creation.

Susan Bence

Growing up in Racine, Mike Jozwik learned to forage with his parents, and loved it. So leading a gaggle of newbies on an expedition 100 miles west of Milwaukee is as natural to Jozwik as breathing.

On land owned by an amiable dairy farmer Jozwik befriended on Craigslist, Jozwik and the group comb wooded parcels. “We’ll be picking basically a bunch of different stuff out there today. Morels should be pretty good out there right now. This is probably the best chunk of the woods,” he explains.

The Medical College of Wisconsin hopes a big gift to the institution helps it establish new methods of training doctors. The money will be used to create a new curriculum that a half dozen schools across the country will adopt. The College is getting $38 million from the Kern Foundation.

The school will use the funds to create the Kern Institute. Its goal will be to determine how to best educate students in the art of compassionate care.

“More on the integrated aspect of how we relate to each other as people and how physicians relate to their patients." 

Susan Bence

Northeast Wisconsin's Kewaunee County is home to 16 large dairy operations. On those CAFOs, or concentrated animal feeding operations, are tens of thousands of cows, who produce lots of manure. Neighbors have become increasingly worried that, that manure is contaminating nearby wells.

Though the county hugs Lake Michigan, it’s what is underground that makes the area particularly vulnerable to manure ending up where you don't want it – in the water people drink.

Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

Gov. Walker is bringing in a heavy hitter to help him raise campaign money – President Trump. He’s scheduled to host an event Tuesday for the governor in southeastern Wisconsin.

Walker says he’s thrilled the president is coming here, even though Trump remains embroiled in a probe into possible ties with Russia. And, even though the two leaders have a rocky history.

Gov. Scott Walker wants Wisconsin to set new rules for childless adults taking part BadgerCare - the state's Medicaid program for people living at or below the poverty line. They would have to undergo screenings for drug use, pay $8 for every visit to an emergency room and take part in 80 hours of job training per month, among other new requirements.

Rachel Morello

For kids, the school day has traditionally started with homeroom or morning announcements. But a few Milwaukee schools are trying something different: they call it “morning motivation.”

The goal at Stellar Collegiate, a brand-new charter school on the city’s south side, is to turn every student into a “morning person.”

Google Streetview, Image from October 2015

The State of Wisconsin wants a rent-to-own company to stop operating here. Based in South Carolina, Vision Property Management draws people into deals to rent or lease houses with the promise of eventually owning them.

jackykids, fotolia

Many people who live in urban areas take high-speed internet for granted. But in parts of rural Wisconsin, internet service is slow or unreliable. 

State and federal lawmakers are working to expand broadband access. U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson held a couple of meetings in Milwaukee on Monday to discuss the issue and search for answers.

Aprelle Rawski of Rhinelander is a typical, frustrated computer user. "It's just unbelievable. You're constantly being kicked out of your computer, no matter what you do. It just says: 'Internet Explorer stopped working. Goodbye.'"

Marge Pitrof

Last week, while President Trump was pulling the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord, researchers at UWM were busy working on GRAPES, or Grid-connected Advanced Power Electronic Systems. Faculty and students in electrical engineering won a national grant to find ways to improve the power grid, including, by adding renewable resources, and they don't believe the president's decision will impact their work in the long run.

Susan Bence

We Energies uses a variety of means to produce power. But for decades, coal-burning plants were the company's backbone. WUWM wondered whether the utility would beef up its use of coal, now that President Trump is walking away from the Paris climate agreement.

We Energies Spokesman Brian Manthey says don't expect to see additional coal burning. "It's important for our customers that we don't have all of eggs in one fuel basket."

Manthey says We Energies has been working to diversify its portfolio.

Marti Mikkelson

Milwaukeeans are still buzzing about President Trump’s decision last week to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord. The United Nations forged the agreement a few years ago; it’s dedicated to curbing global warming. WUWM asked people at Bradford Beach on Lake Michigan in Milwaukee what they think the potential impacts could be on the environment.

Scott Beringer is relaxing in a lawn chair, eating a sandwich. He says he’s not happy with President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris accord.

Pages