WUWM News

Project Milwaukee
2:35 pm
Tue June 16, 2009

Teens Speak on Race

Lowrysha Cheatham, Melissa Valencia and Ashleigh Boatman.

We’re continuing on with our Project Milwaukee series exploring race relations in Milwaukee. This morning WUWM’s LaToya Dennis brought us four inner city teens of various skin colors. They spoke to her about the importance of race and ethnicity and how it impacts their lives. This afternoon, we’ll pick up where we left off this morning. We’ll here from those same teens about segregation in Milwaukee and stereotypes. There’s a lot of research out there that pinpoints Milwaukee as being one of the most segregated cities in the United States. Some people say you can guess which side of town someone lives on simply based on their ethnicity. I wanted to know if that was true, so I asked the teens about their neighborhoods.

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Project Milwaukee
2:18 pm
Mon June 15, 2009

What the Races Think of Each Other

Black residents frequent Mister Perkins restaurant on the north side.

Milwaukee has long held a reputation of being segregated: with blacks living primarily on the north side and whites on the south.

In today’s installment of Project Milwaukee: Black and White, WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson visited establishments on both sides of town, to ask blacks and whites about their interactions with each other.

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Project Milwaukee
2:14 pm
Mon June 15, 2009

Bringing the Races Together

Our Project Milwaukee: Black and White series continues this morning, with a report on a program that brings together professionals of different races. The idea is to increase understanding among the races, in hopes they'll influence their workplace and the larger community. However, some claim the program only scratches the surface. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has more.

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Project Milwaukee
12:34 pm
Fri June 12, 2009

Milwaukee Civil Rights Walking Tour

Shirley Butler-Derge wants to include Milwaukee's 16th Street viaduct, also known as the James E. Groppi Unity Bridge, as part of a walking tour of important civil rights sites in Milwaukee.

Shirley Butler-Derge is a poet and author of several books. She was an active member of the NAACP Youth Council, and hopes to create a walking tour of Milwaukee sites that were important during the civil rights movement. She takes Stephanie Lecci to a few of those sites, including Rufus King High School, the former location of St. Boniface Church and the 16th Street viaduct.

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Project Milwaukee
12:31 pm
Fri June 12, 2009

Push for School Integration

We continue our series Project Milwaukee: Black and White with a look at school segregation. The push to integrate the schools flared racial tensions here in the 1960s and 1970s. The results of the fight were mixed. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has our report.

Words used in the story may be offensive to some, but are integral to the report.

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Project Milwaukee
12:26 pm
Thu June 11, 2009

The 1960s: A Decade of Turmoil and Change in Milwaukee

A store on this block at 18th and Fond Du Lac was looted during Milwaukee's 1967 civil disturbance.

Effects of long term discrimination in Milwaukee rose to a boiling point in the 1960s. The period included a nearly decades long push for fair housing. That struggle was interrupted in 1967 by a violent disturbance which some people still refer to today as the Milwaukee "riot."

Our “Project Milwaukee” series focusing on race relations continues now with a look back at a turbulent time.

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Project Milwaukee
11:57 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Housing Discrimination More Subtle Today

President/CEO William Tisdale says council works to change behavior in housing practices

There’s been talk of a post-racial America developing, as the presidency of Barack Obama unfolds. Yet it appears great strides are needed, including in southeastern Wisconsin. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council has been fighting housing discrimination for 30 years, and yet staff members say people here are still denied housing because of their race.

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Project Milwaukee
11:53 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Early History of Race Relations

Milwaukee has long been known as one of the most segregated cities in the country. This morning, WUWM begins to explore whether that reputation still holds true today. During our Project Milwaukee coverage, we’ll look at the state of race relations in the city, how they’ve improved and where there’s still room for growth. WUWM’s Erin Toner begins our series with a view on the early history of blacks and whites living together in Milwaukee.

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Project Milwaukee
11:49 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Recollections of Life in Bronzeville

Artist Sylvester Sims and a current project

Today is the beginning of our annual Project Milwaukee series. This week and next, we’re examining race relations in the city – how blacks and whites have interacted throughout history, and where those relationships stand today. This morning, we heard about the early history of race relations in Milwaukee – from before the Civil War to the end of World War II. Now, we hear from a man who’s part of that history. WUWM's Erin Toner reports.

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Project Milwaukee
9:57 am
Thu June 11, 2009

Effects of Past Discrimination Still Profound

Today through next week, WUWM’s Project Milwaukee will examine the state of black-white relations in our community. Earlier this morning, we reported on historic events that brought African Americans to Milwaukee, where the two races began sharing the city. However, their time living side by side was relatively short, according to Marc Levine, Director of the UWM Center for Economic Development. He says those already here, along with realtors, lenders and even the government were of the mind that mixed neighborhoods were unstable. Rules and discrimination followed.

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