WUWM News

Jennifer Janviere

Make way for Milwaukee's Black Cat Alley.

During the first three weeks of September, muralists will turn an east side alley into a permanent outdoor arts destination.  

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Wisconsin has had its share this year of visits from Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Thursday night, it was Gary Johnson's turn. The Libertarian presidential hopeful stopped in Milwaukee for a spirited rally.

There were 24 homicides in Milwaukee during August. According to Police Chief Edward Flynn, the monthly total was the highest in a quarter century - in fact, the most in a month’s time since serial killer Jeffery Dahmer’s victims were counted.

Flynn says he does not want to minimize the recent police killing of a young black man or the riots that followed, yet in the few hours beforehand five people were murdered.

Marti Mikkelson

    

What is America’s place in the world? It’s the question NPR and its member stations are asking Americans this week, as voters get close to picking the next U.S. president. Today, we speak with people who patronize a huge local company: Harley-Davidson.

Some motorcycle owners seem comfortable with where the company stands globally, but say it will take effort to remain in a strong position.

Susan Bence

This year's Milwaukee Film Fest will feature the documentary Almost Sunrise, which chronicles the journey of two Milwaukee area natives as they struggle with deep emotional scars after tours of duty in Iraq.

Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson set off from the Milwaukee County War Memorial on October 30, 2013 to walk across the country.

LaToya Dennis

Books in barbershops are rolling-out in Milwaukee. It’s an effort to help close the city’s black white student achievement gap – one of the highest in the country. Organizers say it’s not what you read, only that you read.

There are a lot of things you might expect to find at a barbershop. The buzz of clippers, conversations about politics or community happenings, but not a library, that is, until now.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

In collaboration with NPR for the A Nation Engaged series, public radio stations across the country are asking people this week: What is America's place in the world?

For answers from a Wisconsin perspective, WUWM talked to people involved in agriculture. It's one of the most important sectors of the state economy. Those involved envision its role on the global stage growing.

Artur Marciniec, fotolia

Wisconsin election commissioners were busy Tuesday. They voted to mail postcards to more than 1 million unregistered voters, urging them to join the system and also agreed to place seven presidential candidates on the ballot in November.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The new Mexican Consulate in Milwaukee was formally inaugurated this afternoon. Among those taking part were Mexican Foreign Minister Claudia Ruiz Massieu and Gov. Scott Walker.

The consulate, located at 1443 N. Prospect, will provide services for Mexican nationals, such as help in procuring legal documents.

Original story from February 16, 2016:

maroke, fotolia

During every school year in Milwaukee, thousands of students are identified as homeless. In MPS, the number has been hovering at just under 4,000.

 The district tracks-down as many of the students as it can, to get services to them – such as transportation and food, hoping they attend school. As we reported Monday, a big push to connect with them is underway now, at the end of summer break.

Michelle Maternowski

Monday marked the deadline for the Milwaukee Common Council to place a referendum on the November ballot. It would have asked voters if they wanted to pay more property taxes in order to hire 150 additional police officers. The deadline for action came and went.

The City of Milwaukee could face a huge shortage of police officers. Estimates are that well over 300 could retire by the end of next year.

Rachel Morello

The first day of school is just around the corner, and for Milwaukee students who are homeless, that can mean a return of some stability after the summer break.

Staff is hard at work this week identifying the kids who don’t have an address, and making sure they have transportation, meals and school supplies -- all things the district can help with, and that will hopefully keep them in school.

For Cathy Klein, "back-to-school" preparations are all about her “list.”

Bonnie Petrie

When Governor Walker last week announced the state would spend more than $4 million to spur workforce development on the north side, he said some of the money will pay for mobile response job centers to set up in zip codes where unemployment is high and access to resources is limited. 

LaToya Dennis

Sylville Smith, the African American man killed by a black police officer two weeks ago was laid to rest Friday.

Rev. Jesse Jackson traveled to Milwaukee to give the eulogy. Jackson said that while this funeral could not have been prevented, maybe others will. The only way that will happen, he said, is if people are given not only hope, but jobs.

Bonnie Petrie

Governor Scott Walker was in Milwaukee Friday morning to announce the state would be injecting an infusion of cash into efforts to improve economic conditions on the north side.

The governor promised $4.5 million he says will help pay for a variety of job training programs, mobile job centers in neighborhoods with high unemployment rates and to rehab or raze abandoned homes and businesses in economically distressed neighborhoods.  

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