WUWM News

The Director of the Milwaukee County Department on Aging, Stephanie Stein, says the community is a national leader in programs and services for older adults.

Loneliness can be one of the most troublesome aspects of aging. Gina Botshtein of Jewish Family Services says agency staff carefully screen those they serve to identify how well they're connecting with family and friends.

As we age, thoughts of staying physically healthy and financially independent become more important. But for some older adults, mental illness can rob them of a healthy future. As part of our Project Milwaukee series on aging and wellness, WUWM’s Susan Bence meets with older individuals dealing with depression.

Doctors who treat older people are in high demand these days and with an aging population that trend is expected to grow. As part of our Project Milwaukee series on aging and wellness, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis examines the role geriatricians play in the lives of their patients.

Thinking Ahead

Nov 14, 2008

Next week, WUWM will present a series on aging and wellness. We’ll explore how people can best position themselves to live long, healthy lives. As a kick-off, we asked our colleagues if they’re on the right track. We sampled our co-workers at WUWM, asking if they're think ahead and planning for life in their 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond.

If they are any indication of the general population, people are thinking ahead and paying keen attention to the older crowd. We start with two voices you hear frequently on WUWM, Susan Bence and Mitch Teich.

Efforts to Get Black Kids Back to Baseball

Sep 12, 2008

The Milwaukee Brewers have one of the best records in baseball this season and could make the playoffs for the first time in a quarter-century. What also makes the team noteworthy is that it has more African American players than most other teams. While Major League Baseball has spent $20 million trying to keep the sport alive in inner cities -- and likes to recall the days of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier -- interest among black children seems to have dwindled. But WUWM’s Erin Toner found players and supporters in Milwaukee working to reverse the trend.

The summer season comes to an end today as we celebrate Labor Day. It also means Coach Clifford’s job at the beach in Lake Geneva is over until next Memorial Day. WUWM’s Susan Bence popped down to the sand to talk with the man who doesn’t have any qualms about being called a beach bum.

I walk past the old snack canteen above this picturesque lake. The water couldn’t be bluer and the sky couldn’t possibly be clearer. It’s one of those perfect late summer mornings. You walk down a set of concrete steps, freshly blown free of the sand from yesterday’s mass of wet little feet. That’s where Joe Clifford reigns. He manages Lake Geneva’s public beach.

We continue our series, Project Milwaukee Youth Violence.
We’re exploring the causes and possible solutions to youth violence in our community.
Today we examine the societal reasons that prompt some young people to gravitate to violence.

Ann-Elise Henzl

The Wisconsin Humane Society recently agreed to buy a mass breeding operation -- described by critics as a "puppy mill" -- in order to shut it down. It will take a couple of months to find homes for the more than 1,000 dogs of 40 different breeds, which were kept at the facility.

Many generations ago, Norwegians settled in Stoughton, Wisconsin. Today, its residents continue to celebrate the early immigrants’ rich heritage, especially its dance. WUWM News traveled to the vibrant little city to drink in its biggest celebration of the year. We discovered it’s both an exciting and bittersweet event.

What Can be Done to Stop Youth Violence?

Jun 6, 2008

Over the past several months, WUWM reporters have talked to dozens of people about the issue of youth violence. We interviewed teenagers, doctors, police officers, teachers, advocates, church leaders and many more. During the interviews, we asked our sources to answer this question: What can be done to reduce youth violence in Milwaukee? WUWM's Erin Toner compiled their responses.

Today we conclude our series on youth violence, although our coverage of the problem and its solutions will continue indefinitely. Earlier this week, we held a public forum, asking major players in the field to share their thoughts on the causes of youth violence and what might prevent it. Here is a snapshot of solutions mentioned.

Efforts to Improve Kids' Mental Health

Jun 6, 2008

We conclude our Project Milwaukee coverage of youth violence by focusing on possible solutions to the problem. On Thursday, we aired a report about the connection between violence and kids’ mental health. Advocates say there needs to be a more coordinated approach in Milwaukee for making sure all the children who need mental health services receive them. Dan Magnuson is working to build a better network. He’s executive director of The Counseling Center of Milwaukee, and chairman of a group called “Youth Mental Health Connections.” Magnuson spoke with WUWM's Erin Toner.

For the last week and a half, WUWM has been reporting on youth violence: the causes and the solutions. Many of the people we've talked to told us how important it is for kids to have mentors who show them the right way to live.

Are Kids' Mental Health Needs Being Met?

Jun 5, 2008

We continue our Project Milwaukee series on youth violence now with a look at kids’ mental health needs. A report by the Alliance for Children and Families says at least 26,000 children in Milwaukee suffer from some type of mental disorder, such as anxiety, behavior problems or depression. Members of the alliance say there’s often a relationship between violent behavior and mental well-being.

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