WUWM News

A couple of weeks ago, WUWM News visited a greenhouse on the city’s southside, where 7th & 8th graders manage an aquaculture system. They’re raising fish, using a natural filtering system that cleanses the water and grows edible plants along the way.

Gloria Rodriguez Kappel celebrated her 94th birthday earlier this month. The Milwaukee native was a vocal instructor at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music for decades. In the 1940s and 50s, teenage girls and young women from diverse backgrounds were Gloria’s students. Many still get together regularly. WUWM’s Susan Bence joined them to learn the secret of their lifelong bond.

Gloria Rodriquez Kappel and her girls, as she calls them, just finished sharing lunch. It’s a monthly date and they keep it religiously. Now, they’ve settled in the cozy lounge in Gloria’s retirement community, sipping tea and chatting. The nonagenarian is going strong and seems to have cast a perpetual spell over these women.

Megan Dobyns

Today is what's known in some circles as Paczki Day, in Milwaukee. Paczki are a Polish doughnut, and a popular Fat Tuesday treat in cities with a strong Polish heritage. Ann-Elise Henzl went to a bakery that's buzzing with activity, surrounding the tasty snack.

This month marks a significant anniversary in Barbara Brown Lee’s life. Forty-six years ago, fresh out of college, she took a job at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Today, Brown Lee’s name is almost synonymous with the museum. She’s worked with thousands of Milwaukee area high school students and continues to carve out time to work. WUWM’s Susan Bence popped into one of Brown Lee’s classes to see the master in action.

Throughout the year, we meet people who are making the community a better place and inspiring others. This time of year, we invite them to share their stories and what they've learned about life. We visit with 74-year-old Gloria Wright, one of those "behind the scenes" people who's had her hand in a lot of causes in Milwaukee.

For some of us, the holiday season means a blending of traditions from various cultures, some borrowed, some our own.   We visited a bakery on the city’s south side where the owners’ Italian heritage fills the air.

Buon giorno!

Ann-Elise Henzl

There are lots of ways parents -- and sometimes schools -- try to prevent teen pregnancy. They may suggest abstinence or the use of condoms. But some people argue the best way to get through to teens is to give them a taste of what it's like to be young parent.

WUWM's Project Milwaukee: Wise Today, Well Tomorrow? live remote broadcast was held on Wednesday, November 19th, 2008 at Cudahy's Irish Pub at The Pabst Theater.

WUWM invited listeners to the live broadcast of Project Milwaukee to watch live interviews about aging and wellness and meet the WUWM staff.

Morning host, Bob Bach anchored WUWM's local broadcast of NPR's Morning Edition and conducted interviews with two experts. And, WUWM's Lake Effect program was broadcast live.

At 80 or 90, Life is What You Make of It

Nov 19, 2008

Today, as part of our Project Milwaukee series on aging and wellness, we focus on the fastest growing segment of older adults in Milwaukee County – people in their 80s. For that population, life can be filled with financial and health challenges - or not. Many 80- and 90-year-olds are quite healthy and active. As WUWM’s Erin Toner heard from some octogenarians, life is what you make of it.

The Director of the Milwaukee County Department on Aging, Stephanie Stein, says the community is a national leader in programs and services for older adults.

Loneliness can be one of the most troublesome aspects of aging. Gina Botshtein of Jewish Family Services says agency staff carefully screen those they serve to identify how well they're connecting with family and friends.

As we age, thoughts of staying physically healthy and financially independent become more important. But for some older adults, mental illness can rob them of a healthy future. As part of our Project Milwaukee series on aging and wellness, WUWM’s Susan Bence meets with older individuals dealing with depression.

Doctors who treat older people are in high demand these days and with an aging population that trend is expected to grow. As part of our Project Milwaukee series on aging and wellness, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis examines the role geriatricians play in the lives of their patients.

Thinking Ahead

Nov 14, 2008

Next week, WUWM will present a series on aging and wellness. We’ll explore how people can best position themselves to live long, healthy lives. As a kick-off, we asked our colleagues if they’re on the right track. We sampled our co-workers at WUWM, asking if they're think ahead and planning for life in their 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond.

If they are any indication of the general population, people are thinking ahead and paying keen attention to the older crowd. We start with two voices you hear frequently on WUWM, Susan Bence and Mitch Teich.

Efforts to Get Black Kids Back to Baseball

Sep 12, 2008

The Milwaukee Brewers have one of the best records in baseball this season and could make the playoffs for the first time in a quarter-century. What also makes the team noteworthy is that it has more African American players than most other teams. While Major League Baseball has spent $20 million trying to keep the sport alive in inner cities -- and likes to recall the days of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier -- interest among black children seems to have dwindled. But WUWM’s Erin Toner found players and supporters in Milwaukee working to reverse the trend.

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