WUWM News

Erin Toner

2009 was a make or break year for dairy farmers in Wisconsin. Milk prices dropped so low that most farmers had to go deeper into debt just to survive. Some lost so much money they had to sell their farms. Today, we begin a series profiling two dairy farming families in Wisconsin. Both managed to weather the worst year they can remember, and hope to stay in the business they love as long as they can.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A unique group of gospel singers is making music in Milwaukee, at churches and other venues. What makes the choir unusual is the combination of people in it. Some are homeless. Ann-Elise Henzl attended one of the group's rehearsals, and learned that it’s hoping to take a trip abroad this summer.

Water Efforts Criticized as Misguided

Dec 11, 2009

All week, we’ve been reporting on local efforts to position Milwaukee as the world’s hub for water technology and research. We visited companies already here, and reported on incentives to grow the industry, such as tax breaks. But there’s been limited criticism. Today, we delve into a report that calls the initiative financially risky and unlikely to succeed. WUWM’s Erin Toner has today’s installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

If you have an idea for conserving or cleaning water -- or even using it -- Milwaukee could one day be the place to develop your invention.

That's the dream. A coalition of community leaders is pushing the city to become a global hub for water research and technology.

But is it really possible for a region to make itself the headquarters of an industry? And is there competition? We seek answers to those questions, in today's installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl reports.

Our series Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water continues this morning. We’re reporting on Milwaukee’s efforts to become a global hub for water research and technology. In the past few years, companies already in the water business here have been expanding. But as WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, leaders are now working to kick the effort into high gear. The ultimate prize would be jobs and economic development, along with a good dose of prestige.

Not too long ago, Milwaukee was thought of as a beer town. After all, the city was home to four large breweries, and they used plenty of water. So did other industries that took root here, such as tanneries. Milwaukee was perfect, sitting in around one-fifth of the world’s fresh water supply. All the related companies that developed are now prompting Milwaukee to forge ahead with a plan to become a global water hub. In this installment of our Project Milwaukee series, The Currency of Water, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis introduces us to some of the players. It’s a little after four on a weekday afternoon and second shifters at Badger Meter are busy.

Today, WUWM begins a week-long series called “Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.”

We will explore southeastern Wisconsin’s prospects of becoming an international hub for water technology.

WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence starts with a look at the history of water use in Milwaukee and what’s contributing to the water hub dream.

Dairy farming has been a part of Wisconsin’s landscape for generations. A small fraction of those operations is organic. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited a couple committed to organic farming and to passing on their methods to the next generation.

This is the sound of 140 happy cows grazing a few miles outside Elkhorn, Wisconsin.

A few months ago WUWM News met three Milwaukee entrepreneurs who set their sights high. They hope to create a commercial aquaculture business in an old factory building in Bay View. The idea is to raise, and then sell, thousands of fish, using a natural filtering system that grows edible plants along the way. WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence visited Sweet Water Organics to see how the business is coming along.

This is a space transformed.

WUWM's Project Milwaukee: Black and White forum took place on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at the Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory - The Domes.

The panel of experts addressed race relations and the impact of segregation in Milwaukee from a variety of perspectives: education, business, social services, and unemployment.

Afterwards, roundtable conversations focused on exploring ways to improve and build a more integrated community.

The third section of our "Project Milwaukee: Black & White" forum on race relations, returned to the panel to hear their reactions to the audience’s comments, and concluded with suggestions for specific actions to move Milwaukee toward greater racial harmony and cooperation. Mitch Teich moderated the panel discussion.

In the second part of our "Project Milwaukee: Black & White" forum on race relations, we heard from the audience members present at the Mitchell Park Domes. WUWM’s Morning Edition host Bob Bach moderated the discussion.

Today, we conclude our series about race relations. Projects Milwaukee culminated in a forum on the topic Wednesday evening at the Mitchell Park Domes. As part of the discussion, audience members brainstormed at their tables about barriers to racial harmony and who's responsible for change. Here are some conclusions reached, conveyed by Yvette Mitchell, Paul Schneider, Steven Hunter, Gina Green Harris, Kori Schneider, Omar Barbarana and Mary DeNoble.

Our series about race relations concludes today on WUWM. Project Milwaukee: Black and White culminated in a panel discussion earlier this week at the Mitchell Park Domes. Here's a snapshot of the comments our panel members offered. Our panelists were: Mark Levine of UW-Milwaukee, Tim Sheehy, head of the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce, Enrique Figueroa, Director of the Roberto Hernandez Center at UWM, Howard Fuller of Marquette University and Paula Penebaker, President and CEO of the YWCA of Greater Milwaukee.

This segment of Project Milwaukee: Black and White focuses on what has been a flash point at times: the relationship between the police department and the community. While many officers have devoted their careers and even sacrificed their lives to keep residents safe and uphold the law, there have been instances of police abusing citizens, particularly African Americans. Beginning in the 1960s, activists increasingly brought such cases to light, demanding justice and change. WUWM’s Marge Pitrof reports.

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