WUWM News

Girls No Strangers to Violence

May 30, 2008

As we continue our series on youth violence in Milwaukee, we meet with five local teenage girls who’ve had first-hand experience with violence, in their case, fighting. Their names are Maria, Jasmine, Kwan, Denise and Destiny, and they’re either 16 or 17 years old. Four of the five admit being violent toward people they don’t like.

Poem Decries Violence Striking Young Children

May 29, 2008

As part of our series on youth violence, 14 year old Sheldon Fountain, Jr. reads the poem he was inspired to write about a wayward bullet killing a young girl, an innocent bystander. The poem is titled, Generally Speaking, A Reason for Poetry.

Milwaukee officials note that a proliferation of guns and other weapons has accompanied an increase in youth violence here. However, an army of dedicated professionals staff programs designed to reach out to young people whose lives can be turned upside down by the effects of violence.

Starting today, WUWM News and the Lake Effect program are examining the causes of youth violence and possible solutions to what some have called an epidemic afflicting Milwaukee.

WUWM began a new series about youth violence in Milwaukee. We'll be airing stories and interviews on Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Lake Effect that will take an in-depth look at the problem and most importantly, explore possible solutions.

Friday morning, we’ll have a story by WUWM's LaToya Dennis. She spoke with WUWM's Erin Toner.

WUWM has begun a series of reports on youth violence in Milwaukee. That’s in light of the upcoming summer months, which are often a rough time for the city. Friday, we visit what is arguably the most dangerous zip code area for both kids and others. 53206. In 2005 and 2006, 51 homicides were recorded there. That’s more than twice as many as in neighboring areas. A few decades ago, residents say 53206 was thriving. WUWM’s LaToya Dennis explores the changes that have taken place.

A Magnificent Obsession

Apr 22, 2008

Aldo Leopold was a legendary environmentalist and forester. He spent almost two decades working with the U.S. Forest Service in the Southwest. Throughout his life Leopold loved observing, journaling and sketching his surrounding. That didn’t change when he transferred to work in Madison, Wisconsin.

Nina Leopold Bradley was a young girl in 1935, when her father Aldo invited his family on the adventure of a lifetime. A ramshackle farm caught his eye near the Wisconsin River, not far from Baraboo.

We meet Sylvia Bernstein. She was born here 83 years ago. Her parents had fled a small Ukranian village and started their American life in central Wisconsin, before settling in Milwaukee.

WUWM’s Susan Bence talked with Bernstein in her home, where she talked about her newspaper career. Bernstein says it took a lot of guts; that’s because she didn’t have a journalism degree.

We asked Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett for his perspective on local economic development. He told WUWM's Bob Bach that as mayor, one of his top priorities when it comes to helping the region prosper, is job creation.

As our series on economic development continues, we ask Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker to share his views regarding the challenges the community faces and its successes. Walker tells WUWM's Bob Bach that economic development here is a two-sided tale.

Customized Tech Training

Nov 14, 2007

One of the key things manufacturers look for when deciding whether to locate or expand in a city is the quality of the workforce. In the Milwaukee region, employers and tech schools are increasingly working together to match people to specific jobs. Ann-Elise Henzl reports.

Crisis of Joblessness

Nov 14, 2007

The latest Census figures show that in 2006, nearly one of every two working-age black men in metro Milwaukee was unemployed or out of the labor force. We have more from WUWM’s Erin Toner.

Some Milwaukee employers who are concerned about the quality of the workforce are taking matters into their own hands. Super Steel on the city's northwest side chose to work with technical schools, to fashion customized training for welders. Ann-Elise Henzl visited Super Steel as part of our Project Milwaukee coverage on economic development. President and CEO Keith Trafton told her why he got into the training business.

There’s been a lot of debate locally about creating a regional transit system. Supporters say it would boost the economy and help low income people get to where jobs are being created. To get a feel for the impact rapid transit can have on a community, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis traveled to Minneapolis where a rapid transit system has been in place since 2004.

Regional Cooperation

Nov 13, 2007

When people talk about economic development, the issue of “regionalism” usually comes up – the idea that communities should work together so the entire region benefits. As part of our “Project Milwaukee” series, WUWM's Erin Toner talked about regional cooperation with Waukesha County Executive Dan Vrakas.

Walnut Way covers a 30-block area tucked along North Avenue. WUWM’s Susan Bence recently met Sharon Adams at their community center. Adams has been instrumental in the neighborhood’s rebirth.

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