WUWM News

Police/Community Relations

Jun 19, 2009

This segment of Project Milwaukee: Black and White focuses on what has been a flash point at times: the relationship between the police department and the community. While many officers have devoted their careers and even sacrificed their lives to keep residents safe and uphold the law, there have been instances of police abusing citizens, particularly African Americans. Beginning in the 1960s, activists increasingly brought such cases to light, demanding justice and change. WUWM’s Marge Pitrof reports.

It’s been said that Sunday is the most segregated day of the week. And there’s research to back up the notion. For whatever reasons, different ethnicities tend to not worship together, no matter the religion. As part of our Project Milwaukee series on race relations, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis visits a local church where diversity is actually part of the appeal.

We continue our Project Milwaukee series: Black & White, examining race relations in the city.

WUWM’s Susan Bence visited New Hope Missionary Baptist Church on the northeast side, as members gathered for a weekly discussion group.

They shared their experiences and views of race relations in Milwaukee.

Talking It Out

Jun 18, 2009

We continue our Project Milwaukee series: Black & White, examining race relations in the city.

We discovered a group that gathers once a month specifically to talk about race. WUWM’s Susan Bence attended a recent meeting.

Latinos' Impact on Race Relations

Jun 17, 2009

Today we bring the Latino population into our Project Milwaukee series on race relations. The number of Latinos in Milwaukee County has been growing rapidly – up 40 percent since the year 2000. Now, Latinos make up 12 percent of the county’s population. WUWM’s Erin Toner reports on how this demographic shift has impacted the area’s racial dynamic.

Our Project Milwaukee series about race relations continues now on WUWM. Today, we talk about a newer wave of immigrants to the city: Latinos. They now comprise 12 percent of the population of Milwaukee County, or more than 114,000 residents. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports on the Latino movement here and how it compares with the black and white experiences.

Last hour, as part of our Project Milwaukee series on race relations, we presented the views of local teenagers who belong to minority groups. Now we visit Cudahy High School to speak with white students. As WUWM’s LaToya Dennis discovered, the conversations produced similar themes. I began the conversation with students at Cudahy High School by asking one question. Sophomore Ben Rejniak was first.

We add some new voices to our Project Milwaukee series: Black & White, as we continue examining race relations in the city.

WUWM’s Susan Bence talked with several interracial couples to learn about their lives and some of the challenges they face.

Teens Speak on Race

Jun 16, 2009

We’re continuing on with our Project Milwaukee series exploring race relations in Milwaukee. This morning WUWM’s LaToya Dennis brought us four inner city teens of various skin colors. They spoke to her about the importance of race and ethnicity and how it impacts their lives. This afternoon, we’ll pick up where we left off this morning. We’ll here from those same teens about segregation in Milwaukee and stereotypes. There’s a lot of research out there that pinpoints Milwaukee as being one of the most segregated cities in the United States. Some people say you can guess which side of town someone lives on simply based on their ethnicity. I wanted to know if that was true, so I asked the teens about their neighborhoods.

Milwaukee has long held a reputation of being segregated: with blacks living primarily on the north side and whites on the south.

In today’s installment of Project Milwaukee: Black and White, WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson visited establishments on both sides of town, to ask blacks and whites about their interactions with each other.

Our Project Milwaukee: Black and White series continues this morning, with a report on a program that brings together professionals of different races. The idea is to increase understanding among the races, in hopes they'll influence their workplace and the larger community. However, some claim the program only scratches the surface. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has more.

Milwaukee Civil Rights Walking Tour

Jun 12, 2009

Shirley Butler-Derge is a poet and author of several books. She was an active member of the NAACP Youth Council, and hopes to create a walking tour of Milwaukee sites that were important during the civil rights movement. She takes Stephanie Lecci to a few of those sites, including Rufus King High School, the former location of St. Boniface Church and the 16th Street viaduct.

We continue our series Project Milwaukee: Black and White with a look at school segregation. The push to integrate the schools flared racial tensions here in the 1960s and 1970s. The results of the fight were mixed. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl has our report.

Words used in the story may be offensive to some, but are integral to the report.

Housing Discrimination More Subtle Today

Jun 11, 2009

There’s been talk of a post-racial America developing, as the presidency of Barack Obama unfolds. Yet it appears great strides are needed, including in southeastern Wisconsin. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council has been fighting housing discrimination for 30 years, and yet staff members say people here are still denied housing because of their race.

Early History of Race Relations

Jun 11, 2009

Milwaukee has long been known as one of the most segregated cities in the country. This morning, WUWM begins to explore whether that reputation still holds true today. During our Project Milwaukee coverage, we’ll look at the state of race relations in the city, how they’ve improved and where there’s still room for growth. WUWM’s Erin Toner begins our series with a view on the early history of blacks and whites living together in Milwaukee.

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