WUWM News

What can I do to help decrease segregation? What is being done to alleviate the problem? What can we do to change how segregated metro Milwaukee is?

During WUWM's series, Project Milwaukee: Segregation Matters, the most common questions we received from YOU regarding segregation dealt with solutions.

Solving this issue will not be easy. However, several ways to help reduce segregation in metro Milwaukee did emerge during our coverage.

ART MONTES

It can be uncomfortable to discuss race relations. Discussions may be particularly minimal, in a region as segregated as metro Milwaukee. The group Ex Fabula relies on storytelling to make inroads. It invites its fellows to share personal tales about prejudice and misunderstandings.

SHARYN MORROW, FLICKR

Hundreds of people in Wisconsin die each year from heroin or prescription painkiller overdoses. Milwaukee's city and county leaders are beginning a combined effort to curb opioid abuse. 

They believe they can accomplish more together than on their own. On Friday, the City-County Heroin, Opioid and Cocaine Task Force will hold its first meeting at City Hall.

College Possible/Twitter

There’s a lot of talk coming out of Washington these days, about what will change under the new presidential administration -- immigration, health care and international trade, to name a few. 

But many smaller programs also face imminent change – including domestic projects that rely on federal funds.

Micaela Martin

In Milwaukee, college basketball fans have triple the reasons to watch this weekend's start of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. Two Wisconsin teams are in the running – the Badgers and Marquette - plus Milwaukee is hosting an opening round, at the Bradley Center.

kwangmoo, flickr

A Senate committee held a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that would remove the work permit requirement for 16 and 17-year-olds in Wisconsin. Supporters of the plan say it would eliminate red tape, while opponents say they’re concerned about the teens’ safety.

Wisconsin restaurants have employed many 16 and 17-year-olds over the years, according to Ed Lump. He’s president of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association.

Andy Stenz

President Donald Trump wants to slash the federal workforce, according to the Washington Post. It reports that Trump is preparing to announce the biggest cuts in decades, believing the government employs too many people -- wasting taxpayers' money.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

When it comes to replacing the Affordable Care Act, a couple Wisconsin leaders from different parties have one thing in common. Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Republican Gov. Scott Walker both expect the GOP plan to continue to evolve before Congress votes on it.

Both of the elected officials commented on the measure Tuesday.

Micaela Martin

Repeated threats have been made this year against the Jewish Community Center in Whitefish Bay. The latest scare happened Sunday, and the JCC isn’t alone. Other Jewish organizations across the country have been targeted, so have mosques. What impact do these threats have on the people directly affected? WUWM stopped by the JCC to ask.

Pat Rabinson

Milwaukee Water Commons was created four years ago to educate the community about water - its rivers, streams and Lake Michigan - to cultivate informed stewards.

“I came from a more traditional environmental effort, which was the Milwaukee River Greenway Coalition – working to make the river more beautiful, more accessible. There was already a ton of passion around that issue, but it was by and large a middle class and white group of people,” founder Ann Brummitt says.

Michelle Maternowski

Segregation comes with borders, whether they are manmade - 124th Street, the dividing line between Milwaukee and Waukesha counties, or natural - the Milwaukee River. Today, WUWM reports on one particular border, and how some people feel about crossing it.

Metro Milwaukee has a segregation problem. It's an issue prominently on display within area schools.

Some say, school segregation in Milwaukee as bad today as it was 60 years ago, at the height of the Civil Rights era.

How did we get here? Let’s take a look back...

Micaela Martin

Gov. Walker says his administration will aid the Jewish Community Center in Whitefish Bay to make sure that it remains a safe place. The center has been the target of three bomb threats since the start of the year, including one this week. Similar threats have been made against other Jewish organizations nationwide.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has signed a letter of intent to take part in the federal government's 287(g) Task Force/Jail Enforcement program. It trains local law enforcement and then gives it authority to enforce immigration violations.

According to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, it currently partners with 37 law enforcement agencies in 16 states.

Clarke released his announcement Wednesday afternoon via a web post.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Public Library

Poverty is entrenched in some of Milwaukee's mainly black neighborhoods. People studying the issue say financial struggles piled up as employers left. So they say change only will come when more people are put to work, in family-supporting jobs.

Decades of racist policies and attitudes have led to entrenched segregation in metro Milwaukee. African-Americans remain concentrated in the city, including in its poorest neighborhoods.

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