WUWM News

Marti Mikkelson

Tuesday is the deadline for people to enroll in former President Obama’s signature health care plan, the Affordable Care Act. UW-Milwaukee has been urging students to enroll while they still can – if they are uninsured. We spoke with several who attended a recent sign-up session on campus.

Jacqueline Howell is a junior at UWM, majoring in global studies. She says she turned 26 this month and that meant she could no longer remain on her parents’ health insurance. The Affordable Care Act sets the limit at 26. So now, Howell has to sign up for her own plan.

Marge Pitrof

Some religious leaders in Milwaukee are condemning President Trump’s 90-day ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

The faith leaders expressed their concerns Sunday at an interfaith gathering the local Ahamdiyya Muslim Community coordinated at Humboldt Park.

While the event was planned long before Trump signed his executive order on Friday, the ban - and the massive protests it has sparked - were on many minds.

Image from Facebook

While hundreds of people gathered at airports across the U.S. to protest President Trump's three-month ban on immigrants from a half-dozen Muslim-majority nations, scores of demonstrators held signs and rallied in Milwaukee on Saturday, outside the federal building on East Wisconsin Avenue.

Wisconsin State Legislature

A three-judge federal panel on Friday told the Legislature to redraw Wisconsin's legislative boundaries and to complete the job by November. Opponents of the existing maps wanted judges to redraw them but are pleased that the federal panel is demanding change and yet this year.

Jade Hrdi

Pro-life advocates from the Milwaukee area are taking their message to Washington D.C. for Friday’s annual march. It’s been 44 years since the Roe versus Wade Supreme Court decision that affirmed women’s right to have abortions. WUWM’s caught up with a few people headed to D.C. to ask them about their hopes.

SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has a reputation for saying what's on his mind, even if it's not politically correct. But critics say his rhetoric may have crossed a line.

Clarke's words have often made waves over the last few years. For instance, when his office ran a public service announcement, in which Clarke urged Milwaukee County residents to arm themselves, saying they can’t count on police to get there in time. Clarke says: "You can beg for mercy from a violent criminal, hide under the bed or you can fight back."

Rachel Morello

A new player enters Milwaukee's booming school choice landscape this fall: St. Augustine Preparatory Academy – Augustine Prep, for short.

Over the next five years, the private voucher school is expected to accommodate up to 1,700 students in kindergarten through 12th grade. That will make it the second-largest private school in Milwaukee’s Parental Choice program.

Jordyn Noennig

On Wednesday, the day President Trump signed two executive orders cracking-down on illegal immigration, a Milwaukee County Board committee listened to what people here had to say about a related item here. A proposed resolution states the county’s commitment to protect all residents and keep families together despite their legal status. The committee deadlocked on the issue, meaning it will go to the full board, with no recommendation.

Marti Mikkelson

Milwaukee Public Schools announced a huge partnership Wednesday, in hopes of dramatically increasing student retention and graduation rates. It involves UW-Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Area Technical College.

It was a packed house at MATC in downtown Milwaukee as leaders from the three institutions unveiled their initiative. MPS Superintendent Darienne Driver said it has been in the works for 18 months.

Ron Sachs - Pool/Getty Images

Business and labor leaders across Wisconsin have different feelings about a move President Trump made. This week, he ordered the U.S. to withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership, or TPP. The Obama administration had been negotiating the huge trade agreement, involving the United States and Pacific Rim nations.

Michael Rosen calls the TPP flawed from Wisconsin’s vantage point. He teaches economics at Milwaukee Area Technical College and leads the faculty union there.

Rachel Morello

Gov. Walker has declared this week “School Choice Week” – and if there’s one thing that characterizes choice in Wisconsin these days, it is competition to attract students.

Schools are working to distinguish themselves through marketing.

LaToya Dennis

There are more allegations of the mistreatment of juvenile inmates at two Wisconsin facilities, the Lincoln Hills School for Boys and Copper Lake School for Girls.

The ACLU of Wisconsin has filed a lawsuit alleging cruel and unusual punishment, over the use solitary confinement and pepper spray.

The lawsuit is the latest sign that problems remain. Two years ago, authorities began investigating reports of physical abuse and neglect of youth at the facilities.

Steven Lilley/Flickr

One of the big unknowns under the new presidential administration is what will happen with education. What we do know is that both Donald Trump and his pick for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, support school vouchers.

Milwaukee boasts the longest-running voucher program in the country. Could that make the city’s initiative a template for the country over the next four years?

LaToya Dennis

Big changes to Wisconsin’s welfare system could be afoot. On Tuesday, Gov. Walker announced that his budget will put work requirements in place for able-bodied recipients with school-aged kids. 

Walker says his proposals get back to the very nature of what former Gov. Tommy Thompson had in mind, when he overhauled the state’s welfare program in the 1990s.

Before President Bill Clinton signed welfare reform into law in the mid 1990s, Gov. Tommy Thompson had already implemented similar legislation here. His new welfare system was called Wisconsin Works, also known as W-2.

T Ehlinger

The Trump team seems to have followed Wisconsin’s lead. The Walker administration eliminated the words climate change from both the DNR's website and the Public Service Commission's website.

Then shortly after Donald Trump became president, the White House website no longer mentioned climate change.

Scott Manley of Wisconsin Manufacturing and Commerce has no problem with wiping the term from all government vocabulary.

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