WUWM News

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Computers worldwide have been hit by Ransomware. It’s also known as WannaCry and WannaCrypt. It’s a cyberattack that freezes electronic files until the owner pays ransom. The U.S. has not been hit as hard as some other countries, but businesses and government agencies and individuals – including in Wisconsin - should take precautions. WUWM spoke with David Schroeder, an IT expert at UW-Madison.

Ann-Elise Henzl WUWM

It's been decades since trucks, tractors and other motorized equipment took over much of the work that horses once performed in farmers' fields. But a growing number of people around the country are returning to draft horses for plowing and other operations.

That's often in addition to using gas-powered vehicles, Joe Mischka says. He's publisher and editor of Rural Heritage magazine.

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U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants longer prison sentences for people who commit federal drug crimes. Late last week, he directed U.S. attorneys to seek the most serious charges possible. Sessions says tough action is needed to address the spike in violence in some cities and the opioid epidemic. Jerome Dillard spent time in both federal and state prison, and is now the Wisconsin director of Expo – Ex-prisoners Organizing. It works to end mass incarceration and help former offenders lead productive lives.

 Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Have you ever participated in a color run?  You know the one where throughout the race organizers throw brightly pigmented paint, chalk or powder on participants and by the time they’re finished, they’re covered from head to toe in a cacophony of colors.

One will take place in Milwaukee Saturday at Veterans Park. While the event is a way for people have fun, and maybe raise money for a charity, the act of playing in color has religious and culture ties to India.  

So here’s a holiday you may never have heard about: Holi.

Marge Pitrof

This week’s Bubbler Talk question comes from John Koeppen: What Milwaukee building was used as the military induction center for draftees and enlistees, during the Vietnam War?

"It’s completely different than what it was back in 1968," he says.

Maybe you can tell, John knows the answer- at least part of the answer. He's a Vietnam veteran. The Milwaukee building he’s talking about is in the now fashionable Third Ward - the white building across the street from the Milwaukee Public Market.

Marti Mikkelson

While the House  is on break - and while reaction continues to be intense, Speaker Paul Ryan answered questions on Thursday about President Trump's decision this week to fire FBI Director James Comey, while protesters also made their presence known.

Ryan came to Racine, to celebrate a company’s plans to expand. InSinkErator manufactures garbage disposals and hot water dispensers.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Wisconsin is once again looking to lead in welfare reform. Assembly lawmakers on Wednesday took up a number of bills that would require people who receive public benefits to meet certain requirements.

Michelle Maternowski

People who've wanted to open a strip club in downtown Milwaukee for years appear to have gotten their way. On Tuesday, the Common Council approved a license application after repeatedly rejecting the plan in the past.

For five years, a group of owners has tried to get the city's OK to open a strip club on Old World Third Street. The group even sued the city for blocking its plans.

Opponents have argued that a strip club isn't a good fit for the area. They've also criticized some people in the owners group, including one who's been in trouble with the law.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Attack ads have already begun, even though Wisconsin’s election for U.S. Senate is more than a year away. Incumbent Democrat Tammy Baldwin faces re-election in late 2018. Many names have been mentioned as potential challengers, but so far, no Republicans have formally announced their intentions.

LaToya Dennis

Summer is swiftly approaching, and in Milwaukee, warm weather typically means increased fear about violent crime. That being said, Milwaukee has deemed the month of May as violence prevention month. Community leaders are looking for ways to head off problems.

The corner of 27th and Atkinson is a busy intersection. Even at 8 a.m., there is a ton of vehicles passing through, and there’s also handful of men hanging in out in front of a corner store.

As Congress moves forward with efforts to replace the Affordable Care Act, some people in Wisconsin are holding their breath. They're uncertain -- or fearful -- about what to expect next.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, however, appeared confident last week. He said Congress would end former President Obama's Affordable Care Act.

"There is a fundamental and urgent choice at the heart of this debate," Ryan said, as the Wisconsin Republican persuaded colleagues before Thursday's vote.

CHIP SOMODEVILLA / Getty Images

There’s been continued speculation on who might challenge Gov. Scott Walker in 2018. Walker has indicated that if he will run for a third term, he’ll announce this summer.

Since the beginning of the year, a number of well-known Wisconsin Democrats decided not to run for governor in 2018 - dramatically thinning the field. They include Congressman Ron Kind and state Sen. Minority Leader Jennifer Schilling, along with former state Sen. Tim Cullen of Janesville. Cullen concluded he could not generate what he’d need to challenge a two-time incumbent.

Bob Bach

How to pay for roads? It’s a question states across the country are struggling with, including in Wisconsin. While some Republicans are pushing for all revenue options to be on the table, Governor Walker has said he will not raise taxes, including the gas tax, unless there’s a corresponding decline somewhere else in the budget. 

Thursday, some members of the GOP may unveil a new transportation funding scheme. It involves placing a sales tax on gasoline, flattening the income tax and moving away from the state’s Great Depression-era minimum mark-up law.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Freshman Tya Miller was among the North Division students who gathered outside at the end of the school day Wednesday, holding signs and distributing bottled water.

“My concern is that we don’t have clean water at all. All of our water bubblers are full of lead and they expect us to drink it,” Miller says.

Miller says bottled water is being provided, “But we have pay a dollar for it and I feel like that isn’t fair,” she adds, “We’re students here and we deserve free water.”

SHARYN MORROW, FLICKR

Another set of bills aimed at combating Wisconsin’s opioid and heroin addiction problem are now headed to Governor Walker. On Tuesday, the state Senate, in a special session, overwhelming supported the measures, even though Democrats argue the plans don’t go far enough.

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