WUWM News

Tensions between the police and community, a deep political divide, and American soldiers deployed in an intractable war. Those descriptors could apply to today. 

But they also define one of the most turbulent decades in recent U.S. history: the 1960s.

DESTINA, FOTOLIA

The presidential campaign trail heats up again in Wisconsin on Friday. Republican Donald Trump, and his vice presidential pick Mike Pence, are holding a rally in Green Bay. Meanwhile, Democrat Hillary Clinton's running mate, Tim Kaine, will visit Milwaukee.

The last time Wisconsin saw multiple visits from presidential campaigns in a short time period was just before our state's primary in April. It was the only contest in the nation that day, and all the major candidates spent time here. In one of his stops, Donald Trump rallied supporters in Janesville.

Jodi Parins

Sixteen large dairy operations pepper Kewaunee’s county landscape – so do the fields on which they spread their manure. Today, more than 30% of Kewaunee County residents’ wells are contaminated.

The geology of the county allows manure to seep into the groundwater, and the situation finally resulted in action.

Resident Lynn Utesch served on workgroups, along with representatives from agencies, such as the EPA and state DNR.

The spreading of manure has become a heated issue in Wisconsin. Especially with the emergence of CAFOs - farms with large concentrations of animals. Some residents blame CAFOs for contaminating drinking water.

Today, dozens of people will trek to Ashland, in the far north, where the Natural Resources Board is supposed to decide how the state will proceed.

Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

Prisoners at the Wisconsin facilities in Columbia and Green Bay may be participating in the hunger strike that a few inmates at the Waupun Correctional Institution began on June 5th. They call it their “Dying to Live” campaign and say they are protesting the state’s abuse of solitary confinement.

Chance Zombor served 12 years in Wisconsin prisons. His crimes included armed robbery and battery.

“When things happen behind these prison walls, nobody sees it. It’s like out of sight, out of mind. Largely society sees them as deserving of whatever they  did," says Zombor.

Marti Mikkelson

    

Gov. Walker, who has already capped tuition in the UW System for four years, now says he will extend the freeze for two more. He says he wants to keep tuition affordable. While students at UW-Milwaukee could benefit financially, some don't think the idea is a solid one, at least over the long-term.

Brianna Little, a senior majoring in health care administration at UWM, says she's afraid of what might happen to younger students, if the tuition freeze continues for two-more years.

Bonnie Petrie

Visitors to the emergency room of one Milwaukee hospital are being greeted by a big, friendly dog who’s there not only to lift patients’ spirits, but to keep them safe.

Wheaton Franciscan St. Joseph Hospital has the busiest ER in Wisconsin, and Director of Security Cindy Mangen says it has unique security concerns. 

    

Milwaukee City Hall was buzzing on Monday with early voters. They were casting ballots in advance of the August 9 primary.

We asked several people in the Election Commissioner’s office what they think of two recent federal court rulings that loosen parts of Wisconsin’s Voter ID law. They’re not scheduled to take effect until November, but early voters are aware.

    

Rebecca Bradley will be sworn-in Monday, to a new ten-year term on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Voters elected her in April, after the governor had appointed her a few months earlier.

But there will be an even newer face on the court. Waukesha Attorney Daniel Kelly will succeed Justice David Prosser – who retired Sunday. The change retains the court’s conservative bent, 5-2. Some observers are pleased while others are concerned.

Gov. Walker touted Daniel Kelly’s credentials a few days ago, when appointing him to the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

dream79 / Fotolia

Some new election rules that Gov. Walker and Republican legislators approved unconstitutionally target certain populations of voters - including minorities, students and others who tend to lean Democratic, particularly in the City of Milwaukee, according to U.S. District Judge James Peterson. He ordered the state late Friday to scrap those new requirements.

Michelle Maternowski

The fight for school turf continues on Milwaukee’s Northeast side.

A military-style school for at-risk kids wants to buy a former Milwaukee Public School building in the Riverwest area.

Earlier this week, the City of Milwaukee approved the sale but still has to decide whether the school is the right fit for the neighborhood.

Many residents in the area say it’s not, and they told city officials as much during a meeting Thursday night. They’re concerned about some of the program’s tactics. 

Marti Mikkelson

    

On Thursday, we talked to older adults in Milwaukee about what they think of Hillary Clinton becoming the first female nominee for President. Today, we visit with seniors in Cudahy. Some are setting a high bar for Clinton. John Franecki is tooling around the lunchroom in his scooter. The 91-year-old says he’s seen a lot in his lifetime, and he’s pleased that he’s lived to see the first female presidential nominee.

LaToya Dennis

For the first time since being announced as Donald Trump’s running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence hit the campaign trail alone at Waukesha Expo Center on Wednesday night. The Waukesha along with the rest of Wisconsin are expected to play a major role in the upcoming presidential election.

It wasn’t a packed house at the Waukesha Expo Center, but hundreds of people showed up to hear Vice Presidential hopeful Mike Pence make the case for a Donald Trump Pence ticket.

Marti Mikkelson

    

Hillary Clinton will make history Thursday night when she becomes the first woman to accept the nomination for president. WUWM stopped by the Washington Park Senior Center in Milwaukee, and asked senior citizens what they think of the historic development.

As DeLois Johnson finishing eating lunch, she says she didn’t think she’d live to see a female presidential nominee.

“No I did not. I didn’t even think I would see President Obama in my lifetime.”

Gov. Walker continues to insist he will not raise taxes or fees to fund road projects in Wisconsin. Co-chair of the Legislature’s budget committee Rep. John Nygren says the state has to consider increases, now that it’s heading toward a $939-million shortfall in its transportation budget.

Pages