WUWM News

Michelle Maternowski

Workers at the Milwaukee County courthouse are preparing for a new tenant: the Office of African American Affairs. It’s designed to help sectors of the black community address issues they face, including unemployment and mass incarceration.

Rachel Morello

If anything has become clear during WUWM's week of coverage on innovation, it’s this: Milwaukee needs creative minds.

School can be the first place to open and shape those minds, yet with everything else classrooms aim to teach these days, where do creativity and innovation fall on the priority list?

When we think of the word “creativity,” things like music and art might come to mind. But the definition of “creativity” is much broader than craft. In today’s world, it’s about ideas.

Michelle Maternowski

Cultivating talent and collaboration quickly surfaced as central themes of WUWM's Project Milwaukee panel discussion on innovation and the economy. Insiders shared ideas for how Milwaukee can become and remain competitive in innovative fields.

Researchers at companies and universities may be tempted to hold their cards close to the vest. But Brian Thompson says in Milwaukee that "silo thinking" will get you nowhere. Thompson heads UW-Milwaukee's Research Foundation.

Thursday’s Milwaukee County Board meeting marked the last time members would meet as full-time supervisors. The job becomes part time, after the April 5th election. And for some not running again, Thursday’s meeting was their last.

The agenda was packed with important issues. One was the transfer of the O’Donnell Parking Garage to the Milwaukee Art Museum. The board voted to transfer ownership of several lakefront buildings, due to the cost of maintaining them.

S Bence

Historically, water was key to Milwaukee’s booming innovative and industrial successes. Now there’s a concerted push to position Milwaukee as a water technology hub.

Hensley Foster is part of the action. His career as an industrial engineer stretched across four decades, but he says when it ended, his creative juices were far from tapped out.

LaToya Dennis

Study after study ranks Wisconsin poorly when it comes to the number of new startups. In fact, the Kauffman Foundation puts the state last on its list when it comes to the number of business start-ups.

When you think about a place to start a new tech business, Milwaukee might not be the city that comes to mind.

Montel Allen

Milwaukee siblings Que and Khalif El-Amin see themselves as innovators. Yet for them, it’s not enough. They want young Milwaukee kids, who might otherwise be left behind or overlooked, to believe they are innovators who just don’t know it yet.

"When we first get to the school, I think a vast majority them don’t see themselves as innovators, but after our workshops and after they see us, I think that builds their confidence up. It builds their knowledge level up," Khalif says.

Nicole Beilke

In order for companies and communities to thrive these days, they must innovate. A program in Milwaukee nurtures talent among college students with hopes of keeping them here. It’s called The Commons.

On a recent Tuesday night, small groups of students are scattered throughout Ward4, the old Pritzloff warehouse just across the river from the Third Ward.

As you move close to one group, you can hear them talking about developing a product to help people with anxiety.

WisPolitics.com

Former Democratic state Rep. Tamara Grigsby of Milwaukee has died of health complications at age 41. Grigsby dealt with cancer during her time in the Assembly, stepping down in 2013 after serving for eight years.

Grigsby later became the community outreach coordinator for Dane County Executive Joe Parisi and was recently appointed director of the county’s new Department of Equity and Inclusion.

Parisi announced her death on Tuesday, and described Grigsby as a “special human being” whose sole motivation was to make a difference in the lives of others.

Rockwell Automation

Generations of Milwaukeeans have appreciated the iconic clock that sits atop Rockwell Automation on the city's south side. It was a gift to the community from one of the original owners of what was the Allen-Bradley Company.

What people may be less familiar with is what has gone on inside the firm that specializes in factory automation. It started 100-some years ago, when Lynde Bradley developed a motor controller into a company that has sold 400,000 discrete products. Today, the company engineers connected systems.

Althouse

    

A marathon session is in store Tuesday for the GOP-controlled state Senate. Lawmakers are scheduled to dispense with more than 100 bills before they adjourn for the years.

The Senate will vote on a measure that would have an impact on Milwaukee, making it tougher for cities to force lenders to sell zombie homes, or abandoned properties slated for foreclosure.

Medical College of Wisconsin

Researchers in Milwaukee have been innovating the way medicine is practiced for decades. After years of being on the leading edge of biomedical discovery, how are those in Milwaukee’s medical field competing now?

Milwaukee Public Library

Milwaukee was ground zero for the industrial boom of the late 19th century. Hundreds of machine shops were operating in the heart of the city; many of their inventions helped grow the companies into worldwide enterprises. Yet today, Wisconsin ranks toward the bottom for entrepreneurship while the business community works to improve the numbers.

“This was kind of the Silicon Valley of the late 1800s," local historian John Gurda says.

Ann-Elise Henzl

There's a buzzword you may hear these days when people talk about ways to grow the economy: innovation, as in the ability to create new products, processes and services.

Innovation is underway in Milwaukee, although it’s not always visible or as robust as in some of the country’s hot spots.

Justice Rebecca Bradley and Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg made clear during a debate Wednesday that the two candidates are very different from each other.

The Milwaukee debate began with opening statements from each candidate about why she is the best choice.

Justice Rebecca Bradley touted her judicial philosophy. “I am the first Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice to bring experience from both the trial court bench and the court of appeals bench,” she said.

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