WUWM News

Steven Lilley/Flickr

One of the big unknowns under the new presidential administration is what will happen with education. What we do know is that both Donald Trump and his pick for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, support school vouchers.

Milwaukee boasts the longest-running voucher program in the country. Could that make the city’s initiative a template for the country over the next four years?

LaToya Dennis

Big changes to Wisconsin’s welfare system could be afoot. On Tuesday, Gov. Walker announced that his budget will put work requirements in place for able-bodied recipients with school-aged kids. 

Walker says his proposals get back to the very nature of what former Gov. Tommy Thompson had in mind, when he overhauled the state’s welfare program in the 1990s.

Before President Bill Clinton signed welfare reform into law in the mid 1990s, Gov. Tommy Thompson had already implemented similar legislation here. His new welfare system was called Wisconsin Works, also known as W-2.

T Ehlinger

The Trump team seems to have followed Wisconsin’s lead. The Walker administration eliminated the words climate change from both the DNR's website and the Public Service Commission's website.

Then shortly after Donald Trump became president, the White House website no longer mentioned climate change.

Scott Manley of Wisconsin Manufacturing and Commerce has no problem with wiping the term from all government vocabulary.

Rachel Morello

Hundreds of people in the Milwaukee area spent part of the weekend demonstrating their concerns about the new Trump administration, by taking part in rallies.

Saturday morning, scores of people marched through the streets of Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood. Organizers billed the event as a "Femme Solidarity March," as it coincided with the massive march that took place in Washington D.C. and in other cities around the country and world.

Marti Mikkelson

People were cheering and clinking champagne glasses Friday morning in Waukesha County, as Donald Trump was sworn-in as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with Republicans in Delafield as they watched the inauguration ceremony unfold.

About 25 Trump supporters gathered for a watch party at the Delafield Brewhaus. They let out a holler when the oath of office ended. After the inaugural address, the partygoers helped themselves to a buffet.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some Republicans from Wisconsin are excited that they will get to witness Donald Trump being sworn-in today as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with several local GOP activists who have arrived in Washington.

It’s not the first presidential Inauguration for Mary Buestrin of Mequon. In fact, she’s travelled to Washington for three others.

WUWM Susan Bence

What do you want President-elect Donald Trump to know about you and your community?

WUWM, WPR and NPR asked that question during its A Nation Engaged community conversation Wednesday, January 11 at The Back Room @ Colectivo Coffee in Milwaukee.

NPR Political Correspondent Don Gonyea moderated a panel and took comments and questions from the audience, with the help of WUWM's Mitch Teich, executive producer of Lake Effect, and WPR's Kyla Calvert Mason.

The panel included:

Niki Johnson

Tens of thousands of people will cheer on Donald Trump as he takes the oath of office Friday in Washington, D.C. The Associated Press reports that the district's director of homeland security says officials expect 800,000 to 900,000 to attend.

Landscapes of Space, LLC

Tuesday night, Wauwatosa’s common council reviewed a development plan for a huge swath of the city's side south. The draft, called the Wauwatosa Life Sciences District Master Plan, lays out businesses and residential development, as well as tending to traffic congestion.

But residents who filled the gallery seats and lined its walls seemed focused on one small section of the plan.

Rachel Morello

The term project-based learning is a buzzword in education these days. Teachers are constantly looking for ways to make learning more fun and engaging, through hands-on experiences that show students how to apply academic concepts in real-world situations.

A pair of science and technology teachers at South Milwaukee High School have found a way to do just that. They’ve started a “Fab Lab,” or “Fabrication Lab” on their campus. It’s exactly what it sounds like: a place where students create with their hands.

LaToya Dennis

Want to purchase a home for a dollar?

The City of Milwaukee has you covered, as long as you meet certain conditions. The city wants to spend several million state dollars, to help people rehabilitate homes in the Sherman Park neighborhood. The program stems from the unrest that occurred there this summer, after a police officer fatally shot a man, and residents raised a host of challenges the area faces. The rehab plan is angering some interested individuals, because, of its conditions.

Nate Holton, the man Milwaukee County hired in 2015 to make life better here for struggling African Americans, says he knew when he was young that he wanted to help improve the lives of Milwaukee’s black residents. He says Dr. King was his inspiration.

Marge Pitrof

The Obama administration's Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but it has enabled the United States to take a major step forward in making health insurance available to all Americans, multiple speakers told a crowd Sunday morning, on Milwaukee's south side.

Marge Pitrof

Demonstrators in Milwaukee pledged to fight any new policies emerging from a Trump White House that would weaken protections for undocumented immigrants, migrant dairy workers, students, members of the Muslim religion, LGBT community and refugees.

Late Saturday morning, the protesters marched from the near south side to the Milwaukee County Courthouse where speakers and music stirred the crowd. Dozens of people had driven in from Madison, Racine and other Wisconsin cities, to take part.

Maayan Silver

From the outside, it appears as though not much is going at the Milwaukee Mall. But inside, local entrepreneurs are running businesses, and running them without a lot of outside support. Located on the triangular intersection of Fond du Lac and North Avenue, the building was originally a Sears, Roebuck & Company store, built in 1927. Local newspapers at the time reported that it brought hundreds of jobs into the area.

Pages