WUWM News

Bonnie Petrie

Violence erupted in the Sherman Park neighborhood a year ago – after a Milwaukee police officer fatally shot an armed suspect. The outburst was partly the result of frustration over stubborn issues that have been plaguing the central city. Among the top concerns – jobs. The incident prompted Gov. Walker to commit $4.5 million to help employ people from central city neighborhoods.

Milwaukee’s unemployment rate has declined from 6.5 percent to five percent in the year since the Sherman Park unrest, according to the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.

Marti Mikkelson

Efforts to connect people to jobs on Milwaukee’s north side jumped into high gear a year ago, after the unrest that broke out in the Sherman Park neighborhood.

It followed a police officer’s fatal shooting of a black man, Sylville Smith. Some people joined the protests, to also raise concerns about jobs and economic opportunity. After the dust settled, community leaders called for an end to the persistent unemployment that has plagued the north side.

WUWM examines the job outlook for the area one year later.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

After a decade leading Milwaukee's All Peoples Church, Pastor Steve Jerbi left for a post in California. In his parting sermon, he told his congregation: “When I think about the ministry we have done together, it has been a ministry of providence.”

Aisha Turner

Milwaukee has said goodbye to one of its prominent -- and outspoken -- faith leaders. For the last 10 years, Steve Jerbi was senior pastor at All Peoples Church on 2nd and Clarke.

He stood out as a white man leading a predominantly black congregation. He also became known for his passionate pursuit of racial and social justice.

This Sunday -- for the first time in a decade -- the congregation will gather without Jerbi, because he's moving to California to take a position with a church there.

Scott Meyers, Milwaukee PBS

This weekend marks the first anniversary of the unrest that rocked Milwaukee's Sherman Park neighborhood.

People angry about a fatal police shooting -- and also a lack of jobs and opportunity -- protested. Some in the crowd set buildings on fire and shot weapons into the air, as they faced off against police officers in riot gear.

Today, the neighborhood is still struggling to get a handle on the longstanding issues. So is the rest of the city.

Susan Bence

As Gov. Walker pushes for swift approval of the $3 billion Foxconn incentives package, Wednesday Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said his chamber is taking its time to go through it. Meanwhile, DNR secretary Cathy Stepp was in Milwaukee to promote the bill.

At the monthly meeting of the state's Natural Resources Board, Stepp wanted the board to know her agency is ready to work with Taiwanese company and that she’s excited about it.

arinahabich, flickr

Believe it or not, school starts next week for some kids in the Milwaukee area – and MPS students, parents and staff have a few notable changes on the horizon as kids head back to class.

Led by Superintendent Darienne Driver, the struggling district has implemented a number of reforms that leaders hope will spur gains in student achievement.

Foxconn Twitter

A legislative committee could vote this week on Gov. Walker's plan to offer Foxconn $3 billion in incentives. 

The Taiwanese company is planning to build a plant in southeastern Wisconsin to manufacture LCD screens. Walker has focused on what the state could gain in the deal -- up to 13,000 jobs. Skeptical lawmakers have raised a number of concerns, including about who'll get the jobs at the plant, and the fact that Walker wants to ease environmental regulations for Foxconn.

LaToya Dennis

Across the country, Black Panther Parties are once again becoming more active. The organization was founded in the 1960s and was known for its militant self-defense and community-based programs. In Milwaukee, there are currently two active groups. WUWM's LaToya Dennis went out with one, called the Original Black Panthers of Milwaukee, to learn about its mission.

Amanda Becker

This weekend marks the fifth anniversary of the fatal shooting at the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek. A Gunman entered the facility on a sunny Sunday morning, killing six worshippers and injuring several others. The event left deep scars on local Sikhs, and touched many others as well.

On a recent Sunday Morning, Sikhs at the temple reflected on how the day of the shooting changed their lives. Pardeep Kaleka lost his father, Temple President Satwant Singh Kaleka, in the tragedy. He died trying to protect others as the gunman opened fire.

Althouse

Dozens of people packed into a room at the State Capitol on Thursday for a public hearing on Foxconn’s plans to build a huge plant in southeastern Wisconsin. An Assembly committee heard testimony on a bill that would provide $3 billion in tax incentives for the Taiwanese company.

Susan Bence

As the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative Wednesday announced it would not pursue a lawsuit to stop the City of Waukesha from drawing drinking water from Lake Michigan, other Great Lakes challenges are on the horizon.

The consortium of Great Lakes mayors – representing the U.S. and Canada - believes a balance must to struck to create thriving communities while protecting the Great Lakes.

LaToya Dennis

It’s been nearly one year since unrest in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood captured the nation's attention.

Police in riot gear were deployed to bring control to the area, where people were damaging police cars and setting buildings afire. What set off the unrest was the fatal police shooting of an African American man.

Yet some who flocked to the neighborhood were there to protest the poverty and joblessness impacting many of the city's residents.

LaToya Dennis

Gov. Walker continues to tout the planned Foxconn factory as "transformational." He wants the state to put forth $3 billion in incentives to help the Taiwanese company build its huge plant in southeastern Wisconsin. Yet critics' voices continue to get louder. They're bringing up a number of concerns. 

And lawmakers are likely to get an earful from both critics and supporters, later this week.

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