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A marathon session is in store Tuesday for the GOP-controlled state Senate. Lawmakers are scheduled to dispense with more than 100 bills before they adjourn for the years.

The Senate will vote on a measure that would have an impact on Milwaukee, making it tougher for cities to force lenders to sell zombie homes, or abandoned properties slated for foreclosure.

Medical College of Wisconsin

Researchers in Milwaukee have been innovating the way medicine is practiced for decades. After years of being on the leading edge of biomedical discovery, how are those in Milwaukee’s medical field competing now?

Milwaukee Public Library

Milwaukee was ground zero for the industrial boom of the late 19th century. Hundreds of machine shops were operating in the heart of the city; many of their inventions helped grow the companies into worldwide enterprises. Yet today, Wisconsin ranks toward the bottom for entrepreneurship while the business community works to improve the numbers.

“This was kind of the Silicon Valley of the late 1800s," local historian John Gurda says.

Ann-Elise Henzl

There's a buzzword you may hear these days when people talk about ways to grow the economy: innovation, as in the ability to create new products, processes and services.

Innovation is underway in Milwaukee, although it’s not always visible or as robust as in some of the country’s hot spots.

Justice Rebecca Bradley and Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg made clear during a debate Wednesday that the two candidates are very different from each other.

The Milwaukee debate began with opening statements from each candidate about why she is the best choice.

Justice Rebecca Bradley touted her judicial philosophy. “I am the first Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice to bring experience from both the trial court bench and the court of appeals bench,” she said.

The infection has been linked to at least 18 deaths and 26 illnesses, in 11 Wisconsin counties - all in the southeast and south. The infection is now considered the largest of its type on record, caused by the bacterium Elizabethkingia. According to the state Dept. of Health Services, most people infected are over age 65 with serious, underlying health problems.

domes
S Bence

On Tuesday, a Milwaukee County board committee approved spending another $500,000 to help move along repairs to the Mitchell Park Domes. Projected expenses are mounting county-wide for deferred maintenance projects. The cost of saving the domes could run $75 million. And recent estimates put the cost of replacing the aging county safety building at $190 million. While the county faces important choices, there is one option to help government’s lower costs.

Brian Josefowicz, flickr

Bill supporters say some college students don't report being sexually assaulted because they were drinking and under age 21. So, under the so-called Sexual Assault Amnesty proposal, police would disregard the underage drinking violation. A 21-year-old UWM senior says the bill might have made a difference to her two years ago, when she was raped at a house party near campus. She says she was having a rough semester and was drinking more than usual that night.

S Bence

The director of the Center for Water Policy at UW-Milwaukee’s School of Freshwater Sciences, Jenny Kehl, says the pending decision on Waukesha's request to divert Great Lakes water will have national significance.

Bob Bach

Wisconsin made history five years ago when Gov. Scott Walker signed Act 10 into law. It stripped most public unions of collective bargaining rights and sparked massive protests at the State Capitol. We examine whether the law accomplished its stated mission to save taxpayer money, and perhaps an unstated goal – to weaken the political power of unions.

Gov. Walker unveiled Act 10 in February of 2011. He said Wisconsin needed to end its tradition of collective bargaining with most public workers.

Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley says, via a written statement, she is "embarrassed at the content and tone" of what she wrote 24 years ago while in college.

The liberal group One Wisconsin Now got ahold of college newspaper columns and letters to the editor that Bradley wrote while enrolled at Marquette University in 1992.

Here are a few excerpts from what Bradley wrote:

S Bence

Milwaukee's harbor district appears to be a jumbled mix of old industrial buildings, ship docks, railroad tracks and a sewage treatment plant. But the City is brewing up a plan to transform the 1,000 water-edged acres.

Today, you see glimmers of transformation. An apartment building rising at 1st and Washington. Freshwater Plaza popping up, complete with grocery store and office space.

Dept. of Corrections

A national advocacy campaign is calling on states to close all juvenile detention centers, starting with the oldest and "most notorious." High on the list is Lincoln Hills in northern Wisconsin.

Federal authorities are investigating reports that young people there have been abused and neglected.

The allegations don’t surprise Liz Ryan, CEO of Youth First. The group is urging communities to create local options for young offenders.

LaToya Dennis

President Obama came to Milwaukee Thursday to congratulate the city on beating out 19 others when it came to registering uninsured residents for health insurance.

The President championed his Affordable Care Act saying it has lowered the number of uninsured Americans to below 10 percent.

Racine County

Federal authorities continue investigating allegations of assault and abuse at Wisconsin's juvenile prison, Lincoln Hills. Recently, a former Racine County judge revealed that he wrote to Gov. Scott Walker about problems there four years ago. His complaints went unanswered. Afterward, Racine County pulled its youth from the facility and brought them closer to home. Yet the county had begun scaling back more than a decade ago.

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