WUWM News

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Gov. Walker and other state Republicans had plenty to say Wednesday about Donald Trump being their party’s likely nominee for President. Both Ted Cruz and John Kasich have suspended their campaigns, leaving Trump as the only remaining candidate in the GOP race. Yet, division exists among state Republicans, in the direction they seem headed.

After meeting with manufacturing reps in West Allis, Gov. Walker reiterated his stance that he will support the Republican nominee for President.

    

People have begun applying for the impending vacancy on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Justice David Prosser has announced plans to retire by the end of July. Gov. Walker may have a long list to choose from – along with plenty of advice.

The governor expects a mix of judges and attorneys to apply for the seat that Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice David Prosser is leaving. Walker told WHBY Radio in Appleton that it will be, at least, a four-year job.

Rachel Morello

new report from UW-Milwaukee researchers shows measured gains in student test scores and attendance at Milwaukee Public Schools' Carver Academy, thanks to partnerships with a handful of outside organizations.

Nicole Beilke

Every few days during the school year, a class of MPS 4th graders spills into the lounge of the Milwaukee Ballet School.

They drop off their backpacks then hurry to change clothes. In a few minutes, the 20 students reappear - the girls dressed in leotards and tights, the boys in white t-shirts and shorts - and all are wearing ballet slippers.

Nine-year-old Karena Hurtdo-Reyes explains the program’s name. “Relevè means to rise up,” she says.

After translating the French word, she demonstrates relevè by pressing up on her tiptoes and holding her balance.

S Bence

As Great Lakes delegates take another look today at Waukesha’s application to divert Lake Michigan water, they may consider an unsettled issue.

Two weeks ago, the so-called Regional Body held a marathon session in Chicago and seemed to agree that Waukesha should trim down its proposed service area closer to the city’s boundaries. During the discussions, one question arose intermittently.

Shorewood Historical Society

In 1935, Fred Astaire’s Cheek to Cheek was the most popular song in America. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president. A new house cost around $3,500. And between Chicago and Minneapolis, racing right through Shorewood, what was then the fastest train in the nation started its daily trips.

Marge Pitrof

Steve Liszewski first noticed South Milwaukee's unique house numbering and street naming system when he was young and his parents taught him how to travel the county by bus.

He understood Greater Milwaukee’s address numbering system and became familiar with its street names – until he crossed the border into South Milwaukee. Then everything was different. So, he turned to WUWM and asked why.

Before we answer, let's explore what makes South Milwaukee's addresses different from most others in Milwaukee County.

Coalition for Justice

On Saturday, the family of Dontre Hamilton will celebrate his life. It will mark two years since Hamilton was shot and killed by Milwaukee police officer, Christopher Manney. He was later fired for not following department protocol when he attempted to pat down Hamilton and an altercation occurred leading Manney to shoot Hamilton 14 times. Hamilton was schizophrenic.

Hamilton’s death came before that of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, but protests here didn’t heat up until after the Mike Brown case.

Marti Mikkelson

Only one of the three Milwaukee County Domes will reopen Friday. The county shut down the 50-year-old horticultural, glass-encased oasis earlier this year after a piece of concrete fell from one.

On Friday, a ceremony will mark the reopening of the Show Dome, the one that features seasonal displays. Workers were making preparations this week.

Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

Vehicles sold across the world are becoming more eco-friendly. Technology that turns off your engine at stop lights was first introduced in Europe about a decade ago. Not only does it cut down on emissions, it saves gas and money. Now, start-stop technology is gaining popularity in the states.

So back when I was learning to drive, and no, I’m not going to tell you just how long ago that was, my grandmother always told me that a car uses more gas being turned off and back on, then by just allowing it to run…

The family of Dontre Hamilton on Wednesday filed a federal civil rights lawsuit over his death. A Milwaukee police officer shot Hamilton 14 times, killing him in Red Arrow Park downtown in 2014. The Hamilton family says that while the suit will not bring back their beloved brother and son, it could cast light on harmful police practices.

Grace Heffernan

According the the EPA, American's generate roughly 254 million tons of trash a year, approximately 35 percent of which is recycled or composted. Meanwhile, Sweden boasts that more than 99 percent of all household waste there is recycled.

Swedish native Veronica  Lundback arrived in Milwaukee in 2001 to attend graduate school at UWM. Back at home, conservation was a way of life.

TKWA UrbanLab

The new owners unveiled ambitious plans Monday for the 300,000 square foot Grand Avenue Mall in downtown Milwaukee, including a trendy mix of office space, shops, restaurants and even a grocery store.

The planners say they're confident their vision will help bring back the crowds.

Shoppers have dwindled since the Grand Avenue Mall first opened in the early 1980s. Today, a few stores still lure people, so does the food court – especially during the work week. But some spaces seem to draw virtually no one’s attention.

It’s happening all over the country: more teachers are leaving the field of education. On top of that, fewer young adults are entering the profession. It’s a phenomenon happening right here in the greater Milwaukee area.

Mary worked as a public school teacher in Milwaukee for 18 years. We’re not using her full name because she still does some work for her former district.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A number of people celebrated Earth Day over the weekend, perhaps renewing their commitment to eco-friendly habits. There's one practice that might not be on everyone's radar: finding new life for old textiles, from clothing to household décor.

Bob Woycke recycles textiles for a living.

"As a kid, I was living on 12th and Becher. I remember the ragman coming through with the horse and cart in the alley. Little did I know, I'd end up in that business," Woycke says.

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