WUWM News

LaToya Dennis

Gov. Walker continues to tout the planned Foxconn factory as "transformational." He wants the state to put forth $3 billion in incentives to help the Taiwanese company build its huge plant in southeastern Wisconsin. Yet critics' voices continue to get louder. They're bringing up a number of concerns. 

And lawmakers are likely to get an earful from both critics and supporters, later this week.

Karlos Lomsky / fotolia

The Tuesday U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington D.C. ruling protects wolves in Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota.

The ruling comes after years of debate, as well as decades of disagreements over the size and management of the wolf population.

In the early 1900s, Wisconsin instituted a bounty to keep the number of wolves down, in hopes of bolstering a dwindling deer population. By 1960, wolves were declared extirpated from Wisconsin.

Rachel Morello

Governor Scott Walker is floating a bill crafted to speed up the construction of Foxconn's facility in Wisconsin. Critics say the proposal puts environmental protections in a tailspin.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

It seems as though whenever there’s an announcement about a business moving to or expanding anywhere across the U.S., those deals aren’t made without some sort of incentives from the state and municipalities.

Last week, Governor Scott Walker announced that Foxconn would open its first U.S. plant in Wisconsin and in turn, the state would provide $3 billion in incentives.

WUWM spoke with UW-Madison economics professor Noah Williams about why states offer deals to companies.

Susan Bence

Dogs are extremely good at sniffing things out. Mequon Nature Preserve decided to take advantage of  the canine skill and brought on Tilia, the first on-staff conservation dog in Wisconsin.

One of her trainers is Kathy Hatch. The day I visited, she had been busy hiding several plants amidst tall grasses outside the preserve.

Jessi Paetzke

President Trump on Friday fired his chief of staff, Wisconsin native Reince Priebus and replaced him with Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. Trump made the announcement via Twitter where he also thanked Priebus for his service and dedication to his country. It had been a rough week for Priebus, who had been accused by Trump’s Director of Communications Anthony Scaramucci, of leaking information about him. Rumors had been floating for months that Priebus was on his way out. Before Priebus took the job as chief of staff he ran the Republican National Committee.

Wisconsin Black Historical Society

The summer of 1967 was violent all across the country. Just as in other cities, black residents in Milwaukee tired of unequal treatment and the lack of opportunity hit their breaking point and a riot ensued.

“The creation of deindustrialization was in full bloom. People don’t have jobs. Things got bad. Depression, unemployment and poverty began to blanket the city so it just exploded,” Clayborn Benson says.

He is the executive director of the Wisconsin Black Historical Society.

Rachel Morello

Tech manufacturing giant Foxconn continues to make headlines in Wisconsin this week.

Following months of speculation, President Donald Trump confirmed Wednesday that the company will build a plant in Wisconsin over the next few years.  

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Police Chief Edward Flynn said during the first four years of the current pursuit policy both accidents and stolen car incidents steadily declined. He told commissioners at their Thursday evening meeting, he’d like more time to study what turned that decline upside down.

Rachel Morello

With just a few weeks left in the summer, teachers are asking themselves what needs to be done to get ready for the upcoming school year.

And preparations are not just about classroom supplies, or lesson plans.

Many Milwaukee-based educators have spent the summer thinking about race and cultural differences. They say they want to break down barriers between their staff and students.

Foxconn Twitter

Wisconsin lawmakers and business leaders were gifted a reason to smile on Wednesday. Foxconn Technology Group announced plans to bring 13,000 jobs and invest $10 billion over the next two to three years in southeastern Wisconsin.

The company will build a facility that manufactures LCD screens for everything from self-driving cars to aircraft systems. After the announcement in Washington D.C. with President Trump, Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele and Governor Walker on hand, Walker called the decision a quote “once in a century opportunity for the state and the country.”

Marti Mikkelson

The 2018 elections are more than a year away but already, several candidates are talking about challenging Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan. He’s held his seat in his hometown of Janesville for nearly 20 years. Many voters are upset with Ryan’s shepherding of a replacement to the Affordable Care Act through the House, and that he hasn’t held any open town hall meetings in his district since the presidential election.

Justin W Kern

It's been nearly a month since lawmakers were supposed to pass a state budget, and discussions remain at a standstill.  The issue that continues to hold up talks, is how to pay for roads.  Legislative leaders are trying to figure out how to plug a billion dollar hole in the transportation budget, without delaying major projects such as the Zoo Interchange.  

Photo by Megan Dobyns

Tension remains high between Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn and the Fire and Police Commission after it directed the chief to change the department’s pursuit policy. For years, the department has only allowed vehicle pursuits if there’s evidence of a violent felony. As concern over speed, reckless driving and vehicle thefts grow, so have calls to change the pursuit policy.

A six-year-old boy was shot and killed in a hail of gunfire on the north side over the weekend.  Earlier in the week, four people, including two children, were shot at 39th and Burleigh, near the Sherman Park neighborhood. For some community members, that shooting was the last straw—so they called an emergency meeting to look for solutions.

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