WUWM News

Marti Mikkelson

Members of Milwaukee’s immigrant communities gathered at City Hall on Wednesday to denounce the Trump administration’s updated deportation strategy. He has ordered federal authorities to enforce immigration laws more aggressively, including deporting people arrested for minor offenses.

One person standing with unauthorized immigrants is Elana Kahn of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation. She says her relatives could have easily been subjected to an immigration crackdown nearly 100 years ago.

Rachel Morello

Concern over new federal immigration policies has spread to local school districts. 

Joshua Lott/ACLU

Update: In response to the ACLU lawsuit, the Milwaukee Police Department says it does not use a stop-and-frisk policy. MPD spokesman Timothy Gauerke emailed a statement to WUWM reading, "Traffic stops in high crime areas have been proven to reduce the number of non-fatal shootings, robberies and motor vehicle thefts."

Michelle Maternowski

Dozens of local people who long to hear civil political dialogue got to experience a bit of it Tuesday night.

WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel hosted a forum to discuss our polarized political climate – and how we might cross the divide.

Incumbent Tony Evers and former Whitnall Superintendent Lowell Holtz will continue to vie for the job of Wisconsin's Superintendent of Public Instruction, with the general Election set for April 4. 

Kate Redmond

People have been shedding their winter layers over the last few days, as spring-like temperatures have settled in Wisconsin. We’re used to meteorologists talking about occasional record high and low temperatures – but long stretches like this are less common.

Marti Mikkelson

As the Trump administration considers tightening the rules over which immigrants and refugees can be in the country, one local church is preparing itself to serve as a sanctuary, if needed. Members of the Casa de Restauracion church in New Berlin say they can transform the building on a moment’s notice.

The Jewish community feels increasingly targeted by harassment, vandalism and expression, according to the federation's Jewish Community Relations Council. It reviewed incidents brought to its attention in 2016 and found several trends, over the previous year. One was an increase in anti-Semitic harassment among middle and high school students, as well as more reports of anti-Semitism on Wisconsin college campuses. Another increase the council reported was of swastika graffiti, and a third was anti-Semitic slurs.

Marti Mikkelson

The lines have been non-stop at the Milwaukee City Clerk’s office – of people applying for the new Municipal ID card. They cannot use it for voting, but can use it for such things as opening a bank account or accessing prescriptions, if they don’t have any other kind of government ID.

Around 1:00 Friday afternoon, multiple shots were fired into the Milwaukee fire station at 2901 N. 30 Street. The bullets did not strike anyone, but the Milwaukee Fire Dept. has closed the station and is moving the engine company to the fire house at 13th and Reservoir.

According to Alderman Bob Donovan, at least six shots pierced the station - which he says is the busiest in the state. Donovan says he hopes the impact on response times is minimal.

Police continue investigating. 

A Syrian refugee living in Dane County filed a lawsuit this month against President Trump's now-stalled travel ban. The U.S. granted the man asylum because soldiers in Syria had imprisoned and tortured him, but his wife and three-year-old daughter remained behind, in Aleppo. He had applied for his family to join him but said the Trump ban halted the procedure, so he sued.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

Today is Carrie Lewis’ last day on the job she has held for 20 years.

She arrived, not long after one crisis surfaced, and she’s leaving, as Milwaukee Water Works is addressing another - figuring out how to replace what could be more than 80,000 lead pipes that carry water into city homes.

Lewis came to town in 1995, two years after Milwaukee’s devastating cryptosporidium outbreak. It sickened hundreds of thousands of water drinkers, and dozens, many of whom had compromised immune systems, died.

Rachel Morello

If you think about it, an election is sort of like a job interview: candidates present their ideas, hoping the public will hire them.

The three men campaigning to be Wisconsin’s superintendent are nearing the end of the “first round interview,” ahead of next week’s primary.

But rather than surveying voters, we assembled a “hiring committee” – of students!

Michelle Maternowski

Clifton Pharm describes a slightly different feel to his Sherman Park neighborhood, six months after it was shaken by unrest and a heavy police presence. We met him not long after protesters ransacked and set buildings on fire – upset that a Milwaukee police officer had shot a young black man to death. Pharm was taking his five-year-old granddaughter on a walk to show her what violent actions can produce.

In the days following last summer's unrest in the Sherman Park neighborhood, WUWM met Jay Holmes, a man hoping to help heal his community by creating a mobile fresh food market. Six months later, Holmes talks about the changes he’s noticed. He describes both frustrations and bright spots.

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