Project Milwaukee: Youth Violence

Spring of 2008, Lake Effect and WUWM News journalists teamed up to examine the deep roots of youth violence in Milwaukee, along with possible solutions.



From May 29 to June 6, 2008, WUWM explored youth violence through more than 30 radio reports and a community forum. These reports introduced listeners to children who live with violence, as well as those who are perpetrators of violent crimes. WUWM also looked at the economics of violence, and how it affects the entire community. The stories and interviews featured both the causes and the solutions to the problem.

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Project Milwaukee
7:23 pm
Wed June 4, 2008

The Economics of Violence

Ron Edari is a professor of sociology and urban studies at UWM. He’s a native of Kenya; he’s lived in Milwaukee since 1972. Edari speaks with Lake Effect’s Dan Harmon about the economic roots of violence in the city.

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Project Milwaukee
7:12 pm
Wed June 4, 2008

Youth Violence Can Impact City's Economic Future

Milwaukee has problems with youth violence, just as does nearly every other urban community. While that violence impacts vital components of everyday life such as family relationships, the schools and the criminal justice system, it can also impact economic development. Howard Snyder is Executive Director of the Northwest Side Community Development Corporation and spoke to us as part of our series, Project Milwaukee: Youth Violence.

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Project Milwaukee
7:08 pm
Tue June 3, 2008

New Milwaukee Police Chief

Edward Flynn is Milwaukee Police Chief. He was sworn in in January. He talks with Jane Hampden as part of WUWM’s series, Project Milwaukee: Youth Violence.

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Project Milwaukee
7:05 pm
Tue June 3, 2008

Neighborhood House

Richard Cox is executive director of Neighborhood House of Milwaukee. He speaks with Sara Prince.

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Project Milwaukee
6:55 pm
Tue June 3, 2008

A Patrol Through a Violent, Gang-ridden Neighborhood

A memorial to a gang member who died of gun violence on the city's near north side.

Children in some Milwaukee neighborhoods are likely to become involved in gangs. Teens and even younger kids may sell cocaine, move guns from one location to another, or act as "lookouts" while illegal activities are underway. Officers Louis Kopesky and Daniel Knitter are with the Milwaukee Police Department's 5th District Community Prosecution Unit.

They told Ann-Elise Henzl about the problem during a patrol on the city's near north side.

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