Project Milwaukee

Springing from conversations with concerned community members, WUWM journalists developed Project Milwaukee -- in-depth reporting on vital issues in the region. Each Project Milwaukee consists of WUWM News reporters and Lake Effect producers teaming up to create a series of interviews and reports on a specific topic culminating in a public forum or live broadcast.

WUWM tackles subjects of importance to southeastern Wisconsin by focusing on issues that warrant extensive coverage. The topics chosen are based on concerns we've heard from residents and community leaders.

WUWM hopes that our coverage helps to further the understanding of broad, significant subjects, and encourages additional debate in the community.

WUWM's Project Milwaukee. Our region. Our future.

What topic should WUWM explore next?

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PROJECT MILWAUKEE SERIES ARCHIVE

Segregation Matters - March 2017

Innovation - How Do We Compete? - February 2016

Black Men in Prison - November 2013
Why are so many Wisconsinites behind bars? And, what are the costs?

Power Switch - June 2013
The Promise and Reality of Green Energy in Wisconsin

Help Wanted - October 2012
Uncovering the Truth Behind Wisconsin's Skills Gap

State of Upheaval - December 2011

Southern Connections - June 2011
Cultivating a Regional Corridor

What's On Our Plate? - November 2010
The Impact of Wisconsin's Food Economy

Barriers to Achievement in MPS - June 2010

The Currency of Water - December 2009

Black & White - June 2009
Race Relations in Milwaukee

Wise Today, Well Tomorrow? - November 2008

Youth Violence - June 2008

Creating a Vibrant Regional Economy - November 2007

Milwaukee Public Library

Milwaukee was ground zero for the industrial boom of the late 19th century. Hundreds of machine shops were operating in the heart of the city; many of their inventions helped grow the companies into worldwide enterprises. Yet today, Wisconsin ranks toward the bottom for entrepreneurship while the business community works to improve the numbers.

“This was kind of the Silicon Valley of the late 1800s," local historian John Gurda says.

Ann-Elise Henzl

There's a buzzword you may hear these days when people talk about ways to grow the economy: innovation, as in the ability to create new products, processes and services.

Innovation is underway in Milwaukee, although it’s not always visible or as robust as in some of the country’s hot spots.

PBS Newshour

During Thursday night's debate in Milwaukee, Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton were asked how they would address Wisconsin's high black male incarceration rate.

It’s been one year since WUWM began an in-depth series on the state's high rate of African American male incarceration.

ThinkStock

In their own ways, Milwaukee mothers Afriqah Imani and Barbara Robinson have both lost sons – Imani’s were killed by gunfire, and Robinson’s are serving hundred-year sentences in Wisconsin prisons.

Cynthia Hoffman

Tens of thousands of black men living in Milwaukee have criminal records. In many people’s eyes, the men’s records define them. We asked how they define themselves. 

Justin Kern

Wisconsin’s prison population has swelled over the past four decades from 3,000 to well over 20,000.

Thinkstock

A state Republican and a Democrat agree that Wisconsin's 'truth in sentencing' policy has produced unintended consequences and should be amended.

Former inmate says plenty of young black men in Milwaukee need treatment for mental illnesses and trauma they've experienced in life.

    

Dozens of people shared suggestions this week, for how to reduce the state's high rate of African American incarceration.

S. Bence

Over the last quarter century, one block at 1st and Center in Milwaukee has become an oasis. It took years of caring and prayers pouring out of Clara Atwater.

Photos.com

In preparation for Tuesday night's town hall forum, WUWM reviews the causes and impact of Wisconsin's high rate of black male incarceration.

The impact of Wisconsin’s high rate of incarcerated black men ripples through families and neighborhoods. We meet a woman determined to contribute to a solution through urban farms.

Creative Commons

When people talk about poverty, it’s usually in reference to money, but poverty can encompass all aspects of life.

Think Stock

In the United States, some two million children are believed to have one or both parents behind bars.

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