Regional News

Essay: The One Constant

Mar 30, 2016
Jennifer Stewart / Stringer / Getty Images

When I was a boy, my father and grandfather fought for my soul, taking me either to Cubs games at Wrigley Field (Northsider Dad) or White Sox games at Comiskey Park (Southsider Papa). We went so often that I thought the national anthem’s last words were “Play ball!” Paternal love won out, I suppose — I became a benighted Cubs fan. Also, I loved Ernie Banks, the irrepressible Mr. Cub.

Daniele Giannotti / Flickr

A recent study published in Nature found that by pounding vegetables and cutting meat, early humans saved hours of chewing time every day. In fact, our ancestors saved more than 2.5 million chews every year through these simple methods of processing food.

How researchers came to this conclusion is another story entirely. Subjects were enticed to join the study with a sign that simply read, “Chew for Science.”

Since You Never Asked: 'All Day Breakfast'

Mar 29, 2016
fudio / Fotolia

Lake Effect essayist Jonathan West is a big fan of chewing. But he says there is a time and a place for everything:

Since you never asked…

…it’s important for me to let you know that if you ever invite me to eat from the all-day-breakfast menu I will fling my plate of corned beef hash and poached eggs right at your freshly poured after work martini. Listen to my words, “Breakfast.  It’s what’s for BREAKFAST!”

Milwaukee Share

They were once called “health classes.” But for the past few decades, it’s simply been called sex education. And depending on where you live, it’s an often politically charged topic, especially when it’s part of the curriculum in K-12 schools.

But there’s a case to be made that all of us could use a refresher course, particularly as our situations change over the course of our lives. We get older. We could have a chronic illness that affects our sexual expression. And then, there are the people who don’t fall into the traditional sexual paradigm.

Mitch Teich / WUWM

No matter what our DIY aptitude, nearly all of us have a simple tool kit around the house to take on basic jobs. You probably have a hammer, a couple of screwdrivers, a pair of pliers, an odd assortment of hex keys for your IKEA and Target furniture and often, an adjustable wrench.

One of the main frustrations users have with the adjustable wrench is trying to keep it tightened down on the bolt they're working on.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

The Food and Drug Administration’s Food Safety Modernization Act, or FSMA, is being touted as the most sweeping reform from the regulatory body in the last 70 years. This fall, the FDA will start enforcing some of the new regulations.

These regulations hold food manufacturers and suppliers to higher sanitary standards. The move is meant to shift the industry to a prevention model, instead of reacting to outbreaks caused by contaminated food.

The Lakeside Press Printing Collective / facebook.com

No to long before the days of MySpace, Facebook, twitter and whatever new form of social media created in the last 5 minutes, if you wanted to know what was going on in your neighborhood you one of your choices was to check out a local Kiosk. Usually covered in at least three feet worth of old band posters, pot luck flyers, and have you seen this dog/fish/chipmunk notices, the kiosk was a living source of community information. 

 

moonrise / Fotolia.com

Mention “lead” these days and Flint, Michigan and its contaminated water supply is probably the first thing that comes to mind. 

But the crisis spotlights issues facing much of the nation.

Courtesy of The Home & Garden Show

Whether its cleaning off or furnishing a patio, planting the first flowers or vegetables of the season or springing for new windows, new landscaping or new plumbing,  the organizers of the annual Milwaukee Realtors Home and Garden Show are aware that the shift in seasons brings spring cleaning and home improvement. 

Kevork Djansezian / Stringer / Getty Images

A major investigative piece from the New York Times says the NFL's studies on concussions from 1996 through 2001 were grossly flawed. The league has long relied on the data from those studies to back their claim that the verdict is still out on long-term health effects of concussions.

Bonnie North

Today is the third installment of the monthly music series The Monthly Beatdown featuring Milwaukee singer-songwriter John Sieger.

Once a month on Lake Effect, Sieger brings friends and fellow musicians into WUWM's performance studio to play and chat.

This month, his group is composed of fellow R&B Cadets Paul Cebar and Robin Pluer to play Kidnap You Baby.

peresanz / Fotolia

Despite the winter-like conditions to the west of us, we know that warmer weather is on its way. And with warmer weather comes a new spring sky to gaze at.

Astronomy contributor Jean Creighton notes that the Big Dipper and Cassiopeia are circumpolar, or visible in our latitude year round, but will change positions to be closer to the horizon.

ayadakhtar.com

If you studied economics, you know about the “invisible hand.” Adam Smith first used the term in the 18th century to make the case that the self-interest of people in the marketplace does lead to greater benefit for everyone.

Little Creek Press

Former Democratic State Senator Tim Cullen has had a close-up view of Wisconsin politics for a longtime. The Janesville native worked in politics for many years.

Originally, Cullen had hoped to become a high school social studies teacher, but once he started working for former Congressman Les Aspen, he found himself drawn to politics. After jobs ranging from congressional staff to State Senate Majority Leader to Republican Governor Tommy Thompson's cabinet, Cullen worked outside of politics for 20 years.

Mitch Teich / WUWM

Writer Sara Baume visited Milwaukee recently to promote her first novel, Spill Simmer Falter Wither. It was published to critical acclaim in her home country of Ireland.

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