Regional News

Essay: In Praise of Small Towns

Oct 26, 2016
Michael Shake / Fotolia

This campaign season has brought many divisions this country faces to the forefront. But beyond the liberal-conservative, black and white, and male and female divides, essayist J.F. Riordan says there is another division that has become a regular part of life in America:

A writer in a national magazine recently theorized that small town voters who are worried about the deterioration of American culture are “insular”, and unenlightened, stuck in the past, resistant to progress.

Cavan Images / Fotolia

For all the attention scientists and others have paid to climate change, the issue has hardly registered during this year’s Presidential campaign. Even when it has surfaced in American politics, the debate is often not about what to do about it but whether it exists at all.

Doctor Ben Santer is an atmospheric scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and has recently begun traveling to the Juneau Icefield in Alaska to examine, first-hand, the impact of climate change. He says the science is irrefutable – climate change is happening. 

Since You Never Asked: 'Selfie, Schmelfie'

Oct 25, 2016
jamesbin / Fotolia

If you stop by Lake Effect’s website, you can see pictures of each of our contributors.  That includes essayist Jonathan West, who would like to point that he did not take the picture of himself:

Since you never asked…

…I’m not good looking enough to curate a gallery of Jonathan West selfies. Besides, I almost always look like I need a shave, and who really needs to see that?

Itzhak Andres / Wikimedia

The rise of digitization has made archiving and sharing scholarly information much easier than it once was, especially for subjects with a selective appeal. Such is the case with Yiddish theater.

The Yiddish theater flourished in 19th and early 20th Century Europe and, towards the end of its heyday, in the United States. The subject matter ranged from the humorous, to the melodramatic or even political. No matter the central topic, Yiddish theater was wildly popular for Jewish audiences around the world.

courtesy Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

If you took the New York Times's 2013 online quiz, "How Y'all, Youse, and You Guys Talk," you weren't alone.  Hundreds of thousands of us took the quiz and posted the results to our social media accounts.  The quiz asked some two dozen questions about how we use the English language - and, based on the results - speculated on where we call home.

http://www.eastwestbrt.com/assets/may_e-w_brt_online_pim_displays.pdf

The finance committee of the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors held a public hearing earlier this week on County Executive Chris Abele’s proposed budget for the coming fiscal year.

Essay: Stitched to Kill

Oct 21, 2016
David Szymanski

Whether you usually shop at The Gap, or Target or Nordstrom or a small boutique, chances are good that there’s probably at least one item of clothing in your wardrobe that was once worn by someone else.

The Boulevard Theatre / Facebook

It’s been more than 50 years since the last streetcar roamed through Milwaukee. But some Milwaukee-natives, like Mark Bucher, still remembers them.

Gray & Company Publishers, greyco.com

While the movie, Major League, is about the Cleveland Indians, Milwaukeeans have long claimed it as their own. Partly because longtime Brewers announcer Bob Uecker has a memorable role, but mostly because many of the baseball scenes were filmed in Milwaukee's County Stadium.

Renaissance Theaterworks

The plot reads like something out of a tabloid. Over the course of three years, three women all marry the same man. Not at the same time, of course. But they befall the same fate - murdered for their trouble. The fact that this is a true story just adds to the intrigue.

Renaissance Theatreworks opens their season with The Drowning Girls, based on the true stories of "The Brides in the Bath" murders in England, during the early 1900s. 

Alex_Po / Fotolia

The model most of us think of when we think of psychiatry involves a psychiatrist, a patient, a couch and often - prescriptions. And that is not too far from reality. But there are some in the field who are looking to change the paradigm and add alternative or complementary treatments.

Chris Ranson / Lakefront Brewery

A UWM professor has teamed up with Milwaukee’s Lakefront Brewery to recreate an Iron Age brew, inspired by evidence her team uncovered in an archaeological dig.

pfpgroup / Fotolia

A few weeks ago, the Public Policy Forum published its analysis of the state of Milwaukee’s finances. The nonpartisan research group found that, in general, the city was on sound fiscal footing, though potential challenges lay ahead. 

More than a century ago, the Boundary Waters Treaty established an advisory group made up of representatives from the United States and Canada. The International Joint Commission, it was tasked with preventing and resolving disputes over the use of the waters shared by the two countries.

Today, a primary function of the IJC is to report – to both the U.S. and Canada - how effectively the two countries are restoring and protecting the Great Lakes.

Nathaniel Davauer

As the Milwaukee Ballet prepares to open its 47th season with a new production of Scheherazade, audiences will see a new dancer on stage in the role of "The Moon Prince." Jonathan Batista comes to Milwaukee from the Cincinnati Ballet.

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