Government Hurtles Toward Midnight Shutdown

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye4heQO1v0o Updated at 11:16 p.m. ET A partial government shutdown now looks inevitable after the Senate lacks the votes on a stopgap spending bill late Friday night. The vote was 50-48 in favor of the measure with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., yet to vote. The White House, Senate Republicans and Senate Democrats were unable to reach a deal to get to the 60 votes needed to proceed after a flurry of meetings, leading to finger-pointing and blame...

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Susan Bence

Update: During Tuesday's press event, Freshwater for Life Action Coalition, or FLAC, spokesperson Robert Miranda called for action.

How Roger Thrun Moved Into the World of Moving People

Jan 16, 2018
Reggie Baylor artwork

When Roger Thrun founded WHR Group, Inc., in 1994, it was an appraisal management firm. Nearly 25 years later, it has grown into a full-service global provider of employee relocation services for Fortune 500 companies and government agencies.

Thrun says the aim of the Pewaukee-based company is to bridge the gap between affordable relocation solutions and "high-touch" customer service. 

On this episode of "How Did You Do That?", Thrun shares some lessons he's learned along the way:

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Today the nation celebrates the life of the late civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The holiday highlights King’s activism during the days of Jim Crow and segregation.

One Milwaukeean who’s been impacted by King’s work is Reggie Jackson, head griot of America’s Black Holocaust Museum. He says that King’s teachings hold as much weight today as they did more than half a century ago.

"I’ve always been a big fan of Dr. King and his dedication to social justice work, racial justice work," Jackson says.

Ex Fabula: Break Free

Jan 13, 2018
Photo by Carolina Mulvey-Videla

It’s the second week of the new year; a time when those resolutions and new healthy habits start becoming harder to keep (for some). However, the beauty of a new year is the chance at a new beginning - real or metaphorical. It’s a time for renewal, a time to break free from bad relationships, bad habits and/or bad people. In anticipation of next week’s Ex Fabula New Year Spectacular on January 18th at Turner Hall, we’re bringing you two stories that we hope will inspire you to “break free” in the new year!

Marti Mikkelson

House Speaker Paul Ryan chastised President Trump Friday, calling his slur about African countries "very unfortunate" and "unhelpful."  Ryan spoke to a room full of Wisconsin lawmakers, business executives and education leaders at a forum in downtown Milwaukee, sponsored by Wispolitics.  He was referring to Trump's asking, during an Oval Office meeting with lawmakers, why the U.S. should admit more immigrants from "shithole countries" in Africa.

Susan Bence

Updated 1/12/18, 5:20 p.m.:

The City of Milwaukee health department is under fire -- amid a management shake-up. It became public Friday afternoon that the department failed to properly notify thousands of families, whose children tested positive for elevated blood lead levels. It also became public that health commissioner Bevan Baker has left his post.

Courtesy of the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center

As winter descends on Wisconsin and the cold sets in, our fair-weather - and fair-feathered - friends often take an extended vacation down south. But as many of Wisconsin’s birds leave for warmer weather, another group of birds begin to make their home in frost-laden forests and prairies around the state.

A. Aleksandravicius / Fotolia

Mobile wellness devices such as the Fitbit and Apple or Garmin watches are ubiquitous these days. Many of us wear them to hold ourselves accountable for our physical fitness. But they’re also becoming a tool that employers are using with a separate, but related goal to have healthy employees and controlling healthcare costs.

WisconsinEye

State lawmakers are considering a bill, they say, would help make schools safer -- for teachers. The bill would alert schools when students have a run-in with the law, but some teachers say the proposal would do more harm than good.

The Teacher Protection Act seeks to open juvenile criminal records to school officials. Currently, all juvenile records are confidential, but the proposal would allow teachers access the files. 

Every few weeks, WUWM education reporter Rachel Morello scans through her notes and gives us the scoop on what's happening in area schools. Test your knowledge of headlines big and small with her news quiz!

After a holiday break, students, teachers and staff have returned to Wisconsin’s classrooms to finish the second half of their school year.

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