Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

Danny Kou, the executive chef at La Mar, an upscale Peruvian restaurant in San Francisco, says it's a good time to be him.

Kou moved from Lima to the United States when he was 21. It was 2001, and back then, Peruvian cuisine was still unfamiliar in North America.

What could be more seductive to the imagination than the Walled City? A 6.9-acre patch of Hong Kong's Kowloon peninsula, it was a discrete, warrenlike enclave, full of twisting passageways and tiny rooms, that grew up around an old military base and flourished throughout the 20th century. Though it was riddled with crime and had no reliable public utilities, it housed tens of thousands of people at its height. It was finally demolished in 1994.

Nick Kroll is the star of a lot of things, including Kroll Show on Comedy Central and The League on FX. And if that wasn't enough, he now has a new film coming out called Adult Beginners. Kroll tells NPR's Rachel Martin that his character in the film, Jake, is in transition.

It was 1964 when the young Philip Glass found himself in Paris. He was on a Fulbright scholarship to study with the revered pedagogue Nadia Boulanger. It was a career move carefully planned. Glass wanted to be a composer and he knew Boulanger's rigorous lessons in traditional Western harmony and counterpoint would sharpen his skills.

Gianofer Fields

We've all had those days when we misplace our keys, lose our glasses or can't remember our passwords. However, there are those for whom these minor memory slips don't get better.

When Jenny Marquess’ father started showing signs of memory loss, she promised him that she would keep him in his home for as long as she could keep him safe. Nine years ago she moved in with him and watched him slowly lose his sense of place and time. 

Rhiannon Giddens / facebook.com

Last year, we spoke with the author of a book about the search for the rarest 78RPM records.  One of them is "Last Kind Word Blues," by Geeshie Wiley:

Only a handful of copies of the 1930 record made at Paramount Records in Grafton survive.  It should be somewhat easier to get your hands on Rhiannon Giddens' recording of the song, which comes with fewer hisses and pops than the original:

Ex Fabula: Earth Day 2015

Apr 25, 2015
Kat Schleischer

April 22nd marked Earth Day's 45th Anniversary and Ex Fabula is still celebrating.

In a perfectly told story of becoming one with nature, Jim Winship recollects an absolute perfect day at the beach. He takes us on a trip of the senses, to “a day without tragedy or triumph, rescues or heroism,” an ordinary day and a golden day. This was a day of wind, sand, surf, sunshine and the naturally occurring and endless ebb and flow of the ocean and the simple and absolute natural rhythm of life.

Victorine Meurent was just 17 years old when she met the great Impressionist painter Edouard Manet on a Paris street in 1862. The young, poverty-stricken redhead became his favorite model, and Manet painted her reclining nude in Olympia — a work that scandalized the Paris art world in 1865 and now hangs in the Musée d'Orsay.

How would you like to be remembered, in a word or two? That question was posed by a black man and answered by other black men in a multimedia art project called "Question Bridge: Black Males."

Some of the answers to that query included "warrior," "sincere," "motivated," "dedicated," "family-oriented" and "father."

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Pages