Arts & Culture

Author Interviews
10:59 am
Wed June 4, 2014

After Tiananmen Square, New Lives On A New Continent

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Theater
10:59 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Anika Noni Rose Breathes New Life Into Classic 'Raisin In The Sun'

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:44 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now you may think you know the play "A Raisin In The Sun" from its many stage and screen performances, but the latest revival starring Denzel Washington, Sophie Okonedo and Anika Noni Rose is bringing new life into the American classic. The production has already received five Tony Award nominations, including one for Anika Noni Rose's performance as the spirited, aspiring doctor, Beneatha Younger.

(SOUNDBITE OF PLAY, "A RAISIN IN THE SUN")

Read more
Music
8:57 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Coffee And Mambo With Sergio Mendoza Y La Orkesta

NPR

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 8:27 am

Many of us at NPR Music fell hard for Arizona's Sergio Mendoza and his band La Orkesta this year. Together, they mix myriad Latin styles — what Mendoza calls "indie mambo," salted with generous handfuls of cumbia, merengue and ranchera — and then feed all that through a psychedelic prism. They perform their songs with charm and panache, set off by the fireworks of the group's resident showman, the multi-talented Salvador Duran.

Read more
Book Reviews
6:23 am
Wed June 4, 2014

'Night Heron' And 'The Director' Provide A Double Shot Of Intrigue

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 9:39 am

I suppose it's preaching to the converted to announce that David Ignatius has done it again. But here he is, having written yet another deeply engaging spy thriller, rooted at that point where the intricacies of the intelligence community and the everyday world of civilians converge. However, it's a reviewer's duty to point out some fascinating new turns in the man's work — in particular, the highlighting of Internet communications as a source of secret information over the conventional collection of data in the field, and the actual manipulation of events by means of writing code.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
6:03 am
Wed June 4, 2014

How Chocolate Might Save The Planet

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 11:11 am

When you unwrap it, break off a piece and stick it in your mouth, it doesn't remind you of the pyramids, a suspension bridge or a skyscraper; but chocolate, says materials scientist Mark Miodownik, "is one of our greatest engineering creations."

Read more
Parallels
2:26 am
Wed June 4, 2014

As Myanmar Modernizes, Architectural Gems Are Endangered

At the center of Yangon, the city's colonial heritage, Buddhist faith and emerging modern face are visible in a single block.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 10:08 am

Decades of socialism and military rule kept Myanmar — or Burma, as it was known — poor and isolated.

There was one upside, though. The economy was so lousy, there was no drive to demolish the big British colonial buildings in Yangon, Myanmar's largest city, and replace them with the glass and steel towers that now define much of the skylines in East Asia.

Read more
Music Interviews
1:39 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Bob Mould's Beautiful, Ruinous Life In Punk

Bob Mould's latest album is Beauty & Ruin.
Jay Blakesberg Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 2:26 pm

Read more
The Salt
5:04 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Norovirus: Far More Likely To Come From Restaurant Than Cruise Ship

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 10:49 pm

If you follow the news on nasty, contagious norovirus, you might assume that the place you're most likely to get it is on a cruise ship. For one, there was that outbreak earlier this year when a group of passengers got sick with severe vomiting and diarrhea on a Royal Caribbean boat.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:04 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

From Lunch (n.) To Balding (adj.), Some Words Are Just 'Bad English'

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 10:02 pm

Ammon Shea, author of Reading the OED, has just come out with a new book about words — words like "dilapidated," "balding" and "lunch." Shea says those words were once frowned upon, as were more than 200 other words he has compiled.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
4:06 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

What Weeks Of Debate Have Shown Us About Women In Classical Music

A prop maker readies a portrait of Octavian (Tara Erraught) in advance of the first performance of Der Rosenkavalier at the Glyndebourne Festival last month.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 9:29 am

An astonishing conversation has emerged in the weeks since Irish mezzo-soprano Tara Erraught began her run as Octavian at the Glyndebourne Festival in England. Erraught was excoriated by a handful of male London critics for her weight — prompting a widespread backlash on her behalf in the aftermath of those reviews.

Read more

Pages