Arts & Culture

Theater
4:06 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

In Leap From Page To Stage, UK's Take On 'Catch-22' Gets It Right

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 6:58 pm

Catch-22 is widely considered a great novel; until now, it has been a disaster as a play. Though Joseph Heller adapted his work for the stage decades ago, every production had been a failure. Now, however, a new production of his play seems to have broken the curse: It is touring the UK and receiving strong reviews.

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Arts & Culture
3:33 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Reporter Investigates Poverty by Going into the Neighborhoods, Speaks to the People

Poverty can be seen throughout Milwaukee, in some areas more than others.
Credit wikipedia

Most of the news stories we read or see that relate to poverty get to the issue through some other lens – crime, unemployment, housing issues.  But writer Brendan O’Brien set out to cover poverty different in an ongoing series of reports for the online Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service.

O’Brien’s series focuses on poverty as a way of life in neighborhoods on Milwaukee’s north side, and he joined Mitch Teich in the Lake Effect studio to share some of the backstory.

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Code Switch
3:32 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Mississippi Marks 50 Years Since History-Changing 'Freedom Summer'

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives includes photographs, excerpts from journals and film clips documenting 1964's Freedom Summer.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:50 pm

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives takes you back in time. The facade of a front porch, complete with screen door, invites you to imagine what it was like for some 900 activists, mostly white college students, who in 1964 came to the nation's most closed society.

Robert Moses was an organizer of what was at the time formally known as the Mississippi Summer Project.

"That's sort of what was nice about it. There was no pretension that we were going to change history," Moses says. "We were just going to have our little summer project."

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Sports
2:35 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

For Jockey Donna Barton Brothers, Horse Racing Runs In The Family

Brothers rides down the front stretch before the 88th Black-Eyed Susan Stakes at Pimlico Race Course on May 18, 2012, in Baltimore.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

When the thoroughbreds burst out of the starting gate at the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, fans will have their eyes on California Chrome as a potential Triple Crown winner. And there to interview the winner on horseback will be Donna Barton Brothers, an analyst for NBC Sports.

Before she was an analyst, Brothers had a distinguished career as a jockey, winning more than 1,100 races before retiring in 1998. When she retired, Brothers tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, she knew it was time to get out in part because it started to feel dangerous.

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Theater
2:19 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

1936 'Show Boat': A Multiracial, Musical Melodrama, Now Out On DVD

Allan Jones plays debonair leading man Gaylord Ravenal and Irene Dunne is the enchanting Magnolia in the 1936 film version of Show Boat, which has just been released on DVD.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Digital Distribution

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 8:32 am

Broadway had never seen anything like it when Show Boat arrived at the Ziegfeld Theatre in 1927. The score was unforgettable and the story tackled complex racial issues. There have been three movie versions, but the best one — James Whale's 1936 production — has only just been released on DVD.

Show Boat was the first great serious Broadway musical. Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II, who wrote the songs, and Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., who produced it, departed from typical musical comedy material, with its chorus lines and songs showcasing star performers.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
1:45 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Regina Carter, Wynton Marsalis On JazzSet

Regina Carter (right) with Yacouba Sissoko.
Ayano His Newport Jazz Festival

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 2:12 pm

JazzSet returns to the 2011 Newport Jazz Festival for performances from two complementary bandleaders on the main Fort Adams stage: violinist Regina Carter and trumpeter Wynton Marsalis.

Regina Carter started playing violin as a 4-year-old Suzuki method student in Detroit, and later played in school and community orchestras. After attending the New England Conservatory of Music, she chose jazz as her primary direction. JazzSet first presented her from the 1995 Telluride Jazz Festival — on a stage in the mountains, playing into the open air.

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Arts & Life
11:57 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Couple Goes High-Tech And Low Cost For Their Big Day

Putting on a wedding in New York City can be financial suicide. But one young couple, profiled in Fast Company, say they priced their upcoming celebration at just $10,000 by using online startups.

Books
11:50 am
Thu June 5, 2014

'Guns Kept People Alive' During The Civil Rights Movement

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:10 pm

This year marks the 50th anniversary of many pivotal events in the civil rights movement, and to commemorate "Freedom Summer," Tell Me More is diving into books that explore that theme.

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Music
11:50 am
Thu June 5, 2014

With 'So Much Trouble In The World,' Music Calms Theater Director

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to end today with a regular feature we call In Your Ear. That's where we invite some of our guests to tell us about some of the top songs on their playlist. Today we hear from a Brit in Baltimore. Award-winning playwright and actor, Kwame Kwei-Armah, is the artistic director of Baltimore Centerstage Theater. When we caught up with him to talk about making a life, and making art across the pond, he also shared the music that helps him relax from the rigors of the transatlantic life.

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Arts & Culture
11:41 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What's That Over There?: Tanzilo Explores the Less-Visited Parts of Milwaukee

Bobby Tanzilo explores the histories of the small nooks and crannies of Milwaukee.
Credit Boswell Books

The line goes something like this: it was midnight in the city that keeps its secrets… Like all cities, there are quite a few out of the way and forgotten corners of Milwaukee. Some are hidden in plain sight; others take a bit of sleuthing. And as Bobby Tanzilo found out, some of them require no fear of spiders, heights, or closed spaces to access.

"We're trying to figure out what people are talking about, and specifically to Milwaukee, we're pitching Milwaukee and the bookstore as a place for, say, authors to visit over the next year," says Tanzilo.

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