Arts & Culture

NPR Story
5:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Memories Served Dish By Dish

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Soft boiled eggs and buttered toast - it may not be something you need to follow a recipe to make and not perhaps the most memorable dish you've ever had, but soft boiled eggs and buttered toast have the power to connect author Kate Christensen to another time and place. Christensen has written a new memoir. It's called "Blue Plate Special." And in it, she includes recipes and talks about the foods that connect her to different chapters of her own life.

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The Record
1:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Small-Town Audio Geeks Bring Big Sounds To The Dance Floor

Fulcrum Acoustic engineer Rich Frembes (left) and founder Dave Gunness pose in their workshop. The company produces more than 2,000 speakers a year, often testing and tweaking the units obsessively to meet each client's specific needs.
Andrea Shea

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

The headquarters of Fulcrum Acoustic is only an hour outside Boston, but finding the audio company can be tricky: Its address in Whitinsville, a quaint former industrial village in Massachusetts' Blackstone Valley, doesn't register on GPS. Fulcrum's founder, Dave Gunness, opened his workshop here five years ago and says people still have trouble finding it.

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Sunday Puzzle
1:33 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Easy As One, Two, Three Initials

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:21 pm

On-air challenge: You're given the three-word names of famous people. For each one, you get a clue to a familiar three-word phrase or title that has the same initials as the person. Name the phrase or title. For example, singer Billy Ray Cyrus has the initials B-R-C. And B-R-C are also the initials of the phrase "Blue ribbon commission."

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Author Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Finding Meaning In The Mosh Pit Among Often-Reviled Groupies

Shaggy 2 Dope, left, and Violent J make of the rap duo Insane Clown Posse, seen here in their stage makeup in 1999.
Joseph Cultice AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

The bands Phish and Insane Clown Posse have spawned some of the most rabid fans in music history. Their world of obsession is not an easy one to break into, but on a warm December night in Miami back in 2009, pop culture writer Nathan Rabin went to see a concert that would inspire him to enter the orbit of these infamous groupies.

He wrote a book about them, You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me, and tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rebecca Sheir about his first-hand look at the two often-reviled sub-cultures.

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Movie Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

The Man Who Helps Johnny Depp Put His Face On

With a long history of Johnny Depp collaborations — from Edward Scissorhands through the Pirates of the Caribbean films to this summer's The Lone Ranger — Joel Harlow knows that sometimes you've just gotta ignore the dead crow and get on with the job.
Peter Mountain Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

When Joel Harlow started his career, he was perfectly happy sleeping on the floor — as long as he was making monsters. He was doing what he always wanted: working as a makeup artist.

Years later, Harlow is no longer using peanut butter for monster touch-ups (yes, that happened). He's worked with actor Johnny Depp on about a dozen films with some rather makeup-heavy characters.

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Music Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Yiddish Preservationists Take Their Subject To The Stage

Michael Alpert and Ethel Raim perform as part of the An-sky Yiddish Heritage Ensemble.
Janina Wurbs Courtesy of The Center for Traditional Music and Dance

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:49 am

The name of the An-sky Yiddish Heritage Ensemble doubles as its mission statement: The quartet of performers and researchers has built a repetoire of old Yiddish folk songs dating back 100 years to the shtetls of Ukraine, in hopes of keeping that music from disappearing. Michael Alpert, who sings in the group, says it's part of a revival of Eastern Eurpoean Jewish culture that's be going on for nearly 40 years.

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The Salt
3:47 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

The Art Of Food: Museum Celebrates Iconic Catalan Chef's Cuisine

Catalan chef Ferran Adrià poses with plasticine models of his food on display at Somerset House in London. A new exhibit looks back at the influential modernist chef and his landmark restaurant, El Bulli.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images for Somerset House

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:20 am

The man once hailed as the "Salvador Dali of the kitchen" is getting his own art exhibit.

Ferran Adrià might not be a household name, but for nearly three decades, as chef and mastermind of the acclaimed Catalan Spanish restaurant El Bulli, he moussed, foamed and otherwise re-imagined cuisine in modernist ways that have inspired many of the world's top chefs.

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Pop Culture
8:54 am
Sat July 6, 2013

Miranda July: From The Outboxes Of The Noteworthy

Performance artist Miranda July's new project, We Think Alone, blasts a set of random emails from some well-known names on intimate topics to anyone who signs up for them.
Courtesy the artist

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:16 pm

Filmmaker and artist Miranda July is blasting emails copied from the outboxes of some well-known names on intimate topics to anyone who signs up.

The project is called We Think Alone, and includes messages sent from a range of notable people (who agreed to participate in advance, of course). Those names include the NBA's all-time leading scorer Kareem Abdul Jabar, fashion-designing siblings Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, and a Canadian-American theoretical physicist.

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Food
8:54 am
Sat July 6, 2013

An Italian Picnic Without The Pasta

In this installment of our Weekend Picnic series, Jim Kent visits an Italian chef in South Dakota's Black Hills, who shows us how to prepare a great lightweight picnic.

Author Interviews
8:54 am
Sat July 6, 2013

'Loteria': A Fortune Told By Mexican Bingo

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:31 pm

When novelist Mario Alberto Zambrano was a little boy, his imagination was piqued by a colorful deck of cards. Loteria is a Mexican game that's a lot like bingo, if bingo was full of vivid imagery. Instead of announcing numbers, the dealer turns over illustrated cards while calling out a riddle that corresponds with the picture — a spider, a rooster, a mermaid, a bottle.

Zambrano tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer that he used to wonder if those pictures were significant.

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