Economy & Business

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Do you think the Supreme Court shops online?

Jun 21, 2018

We're asking because today a narrow majority ruled that online shoppers have to pay state sales tax, even if the business doesn’t have a physical presence in the state. We'll talk about what that means for companies like Wayfair, the defendant in this case, and consumers. Then we'll bring you the latest on gas prices for the summer. Plus: Brownsville, Texas, is just a 10-minute walk from Matamoros, a city in Tamaulipas, Mexico. As the Trump administration's immigration policy causes tension nationally, Brownsville's local economy feels its effects firsthand.

That's what Kansas Senator Pat Roberts said to Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross at Wednesday's Finance Committee hearing. He also asked if Ross would personally call one of his constituents, Mike Bergmeier, who works at a company that makes agricultural equipment in Hutchinson, Kansas. Ross promised to call Bergmeier and he kept that promise. We also gave Bergmeier a call to see what he had to say about steel tariff exemptions in the agriculture industry.

Supreme Court rules for states in online sales tax case

Jun 21, 2018

The Supreme Court says states can force online shoppers to pay sales tax.

The 5-4 ruling Thursday is a win for states, who said they were losing out on billions of dollars annually under two decades-old Supreme Court decisions that impacted online sales tax collection.

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When companies take a stand on immigration

Jun 21, 2018

(Markets Edition) Stocks are down right now for several German car companies, including Daimler, BMW and Volkswagen. The likely cause: tariff threats. Diane Swonk, chief economist at the consulting and accounting firm Grant Thornton, explains how these tariff decisions aren't accounting for our global supply chain. Afterwards, we'll look at how several corporations are pushing back against the Trump administration's immigration policies.

Some online sales are about to start costing more.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that states can require retailers to collect and remit sales taxes on out-of-state purchases. The 5-to-4 decision reversed decades-old decisions that protected out-of-state vendors from sales tax obligations unless the vendor had a physical presence in the state.

Another government shutdown might be around the corner

Jun 21, 2018

The U.S. already had one government shutdown earlier this year, now we might be headed toward another this October. 

OPEC poised to shift oil agreements

Jun 21, 2018

Representatives from oil producing nations are in Vienna for the biannual OPEC summit. The organization’s most recent agreement capped production. But demand is soaring, so some significant changes could come out of this round of meetings. That’s because of varying goals among oil producing countries.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) Reps from oil-producing countries are meeting for the bi-annual OPEC summit, and it has the potential to turn sour. We'll look at the varying goals these nations have and the geopolitical factors that could complicate this meeting. Afterwards, we'll discuss reports that the Trump administration is planning to combine the U.S.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … New retaliatory measures are aimed at the U.S., this time from India in response to steel and aluminium tariffs. Then, it’s a big day for Greece as its creditors are expected to unveil an economic road map for the country’s third bailout. Afterwards, roads, railways, and bridges were supposed to form the foundations of a prosperous economy in Zambia. But the country has borrowed too much too quickly and now it’s in trouble.

Is the e-scooter craze more bubble than business?

Jun 21, 2018

Venture capitalists have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in scooters — electric scooters, specifically. On a sunny day in San Francisco, they're clogging every sidewalk. Lime and Bird are the two best-known options. They also operate in Santa Monica, California; Washington, D.C.; Austin, Texas; and Atlanta. You use an app to check out a scooter, GPS tracks your location and you just drop it anywhere when you're done with it. There's speculation that Uber or Lyft will buy one of the bigger companies since both have invested in electric bikes. Bird is being valued at $2 billion.

A Canadian mining firm says it will move forward with plans to mine minerals from land that was previously part of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah.

Is the e-scooter craze more bubble than business?

Jun 21, 2018

Venture capitalists have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in scooters — electric scooters, specifically. On a sunny day in San Francisco, they're clogging every sidewalk. Lime and Bird are the two best-known options. They also operate in Santa Monica, California; Washington, D.C.; Austin, Texas; and Atlanta. You use an app to check out a scooter, GPS tracks your location and you just drop it anywhere when you're done with it. There's speculation that Uber or Lyft will buy one of the bigger companies since both have invested in electric bikes.

As President Trump faced growing outrage over his child detention policy on the U.S.-Mexico border, conservative outlets like Fox News and Breitbart scrambled to his defense. They urged Trump to stand firm, describing the forced separation of migrant children from their families as part of a strategy to keep America's borders safe.

China is threatening to impose new tariffs on lobsters from the U.S. in what could be the latest volley in a growing trade war. But the American lobster industry is already starting to feel the impact of steel tariffs imposed by the Trump administration.

Bob Morris opens the bulkhead doors to his basement in Rockport, Massachusetts, and heads down into his workshop. Morris is a lifelong lobsterman, and when he's not out hauling lobster traps, he's building them in his basement.

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