Economy & Business

Business news

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump declared Wednesday he is disbanding two economic advisory panels, after a growing number of the corporate CEO's who sat on them decided to leave, in the wake of Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Trump said in a tweet that he is ending the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative and the Strategic and Policy Forum "rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople" that made up those groups.

Do viewers want film and TV to directly confront racism?

Aug 16, 2017

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, this past weekend and the president's many responses have brought a whole bunch of things in this society and this economy to the surface. One of the big things is America's issues with race and racism. That can be troubling to think about and sometimes hard to talk about, but it doesn't mean it's not an important conversation that's impacting our culture.

Officials from the U.S., Mexico and Canada met Wednesday to begin renegotiations of the North American Free Trade Agreement. In an opening statement, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer praised President Trump for the fact that these negotiations were even happening.

"American politicians have been promising to renegotiate NAFTA for years, but today, President Trump is going to fulfill those promises," he said.

President Trump roiled opinion Tuesday by reversing himself and reiterating his claim that "both sides" of a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., were to blame for violence that killed one woman and left many injured.

Trump made the remarks at a news conference at Trump Tower in New York, engaging in back-and-forth exchanges with reporters about what transpired in Charlottesville over the weekend.

President Trump’s main council of top corporate executives fell apart today following Trump's remarks that the violence at a rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virgina, was perpetrated by many sides. A wave of resignations from the president's American Manufacturing Council started Monday and continued this morning, until Trump abruptly disbanded it and another group with this tweet: 

Why aren't there more female CEOs?

Aug 16, 2017

The number of female CEOs may be higher today than it was 10 years ago, but it's still not great. And in the last couple of months, some high-profile female CEOs have been forced out of their jobs. Julie Creswell at the New York Times and Jena McGregor at the Washington Post have both written about why corporate America has been so slow to hire women for C-suite positions and what happens once women get to those positions. 

 

At age 31, Nixon Arias cut a profile similar to many unauthorized immigrants in the United States. A native of Honduras, he had been in the country for more than a decade and had worked off and on for a landscaping company for nine years. The money he earned went to building a future for his family in Pensacola, Fla. His Facebook page was filled with photos of fishing and other moments with his three boys, ages 3, 7 and 8.

But in November 2013, that life began to unravel.

28: CEOs quit the CEO in Chief

Aug 16, 2017

Globalization is in the headlines, but what does it mean for our economy? Marketplace's Scott Tong explains it to us. We answer your questions about globalism, nationalism and the companies that have to navigate between these rocky shoals. Plus, we picked our next Make Me Smart book! You've got about a month to read it. Finally, you have questions and answers about bitcoin and cryptocurrency.

CEOs of some of the biggest companies in America have been saying for the past two days they simply had to stay on two White House councils. But after Trump's comments yesterday, more and more of them changed their minds and said a seat at the table wasn't worth it. Finally, President Trump announced via Twitter that he'd be disbanding the councils anyway, thank you very much. We'll talk about what changed the dynamic between the executive in D.C. and all the rest of them. Then: We told you yesterday about the time BMW took a chance on building a huge factory stateside.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

08/16/2017: The price tag of letting Obamacare fail

Aug 16, 2017

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has released a new report evaluating what would happen if Trump cut off Obamacare subsidies. The result: the government will actually end up shelling out more money. We'll take a look at why this move would cost them more, and how taxpayers would be affected. Afterwards, we'll discuss a decline in the number of new homes being built in the U.S., and then talk about fringe sites that are popping up to support white supremacist groups as they get kicked off of more mainstream platforms.

"We make German cars, in America"

Aug 16, 2017

The idea of more open, global trade has been sold as necessary for economic success. Yet today we hear calls to "build a wall" and to break up trading partnerships. Turns out we've seen the pendulum swing between free trade and protectionism many times before. Our series Trade Off looks at key moments when trade barriers have been built up or torn down and at globalization's winners and losers. 

Pop quiz: How are nuclear power plants in the U.S. related to national security? It’s OK if you don’t have an answer, because a new 38-page report from the former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz makes that link explicit. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Life in Charlottesville, Va., has been disrupted by the deadly violence at a white supremacist rally over the weekend. On the eve of the memorial for one of the victims, counterprotester Heather Heyer, President Trump blamed those counterprotesters — what he called the "alt-left" – for stoking the violence.

After Trump's remarks, Charlottesville Vice Mayor Wes Bellamy had to control his anger. He says the president is showing where his loyalties lie.

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