Economy & Business

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Live from London: It’s Woody Harrelson

Jan 18, 2017

In an effort to boost movie theater attendance on weekdays, Fathom Entertainment on Thursday will live stream “Lost In London,” a one-hour live movie shot by Woody Harrelson. Strong ticket sales could make a difference to this small but growing segment of the movie theater business.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Let’s do the numbers: the cost of inauguration

Jan 18, 2017
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Sabri Ben-Achour and Marketplace staff

President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration celebration Friday may cost millions of dollars, but American taxpayers aren’t footing the entire bill.

“The taxpayer pays for everything surrounding the actual ceremony that's involved with swearing in the president,” Washington Post reporter Roxanne Roberts told us. “But all the things that we typically think of as part of an inaugural — parade, the balls, the fancy parties — are privately funded by the Presidential Inaugural Committee.”

01/18/2017: 'Mutually assured economic destruction'

Jan 17, 2017
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Marketplace

It's another week of confirmation hearings for Trump's cabinet picks. We'll share the highlights from Betsy Devos's contentious hearing, and look at what we can expect from Tom Price's. Next, Marketplace's Scott Tong will discuss what the relationship between the U.S. and China might look like after Trump takes office. Do we have a future trade war on our hands? 

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Marketplace

Think the rise of digital means a reduced ecological footprint? Turns out streaming the latest hit show might be bad for the environment, according to a new Greenpeace report. Quartz's Ashley Rodriguez explains how exactly the streaming industry uses energyAfterwards, we'll look at news that online grocery stores will soon be allowed to accept food stamps, and then talk about the possibility of bendable phones.

In a flood of clemency orders before he leaves office, President Obama commuted the sentences of 209 people and pardoned 64 others on Tuesday. The vast majority of offenders had been convicted of drug-related crimes. Two were involved in cases about leaks of government material. And two were cultural stars of past decades who had run afoul of the IRS.

For several years, Oxfam International has released an annual report on global wealth inequity. The numbers were startling: In the 2016 report, Oxfam said the world's richest 62 people owned as much wealth as the poorest 3.6 billion.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As the presidency of Barack Obama comes to an end, we're taking stock - and so is he.

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In an article last month on state goals for 2017, China's Xinhua news agency reported, "China has lifted 700 million people out of poverty through more than 30 years of reform and opening-up," while aiming to "lift" 10 million more in the coming year.

nateemee / Fotolia

As the stock markets opened today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was running at just over 19,885.  If things go especially well today, it could very well finish over the 20,000 mark for the first time in history. 

This may seem monumental, but award-winning Washington Post financial columnist and Marketplace Morning Report contributor Allan Sloan says not to get too excited.

The number of people 60 and older with student loan debt has quadrupled in the past decade, and older Americans now represent the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. student loan market, according to a new report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

As of 2015, more than 2.8 million Americans over 60 had outstanding student loan debt — up from some 700,000 in 2005.

Before Luke Whitbeck began taking a $300,000-a-year drug, the 2-year-old's health was inexplicably failing.

A pale boy with enormous eyes, Luke frequently ran high fevers, tired easily and was skinny all over, except his belly stuck out like a bowling ball.

"What does your medicine do for you?" Luke's mother, Meg, asked after his weekly drug treatment recently.

Donald Trump’s breaks with the GOP on a border tax

Jan 17, 2017

President-elect Donald Trump has said he wants a big border tax on imported goods to encourage corporations to set up factories in the U.S. Republican leaders in Congress don't love the idea, and they've come up with their own plan.

It’s called a border-adjusted tax. However, in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Trump said the GOP plan is too complicated, opening a potential rift with the party. 

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Molly Wood

If you're tired of superhero sequels and "Star Wars" dominating the box office, get ready for an onslaught of musicals.

Hollywood has been afraid of the genre for decades, but thanks to some recent successes, execs are changing their tune. According to the New York Times, studios have at least 20 new musicals in the works.

The long arm of the pharmaceutical industry continues to pervade practically every area of medicine, reaching those who write guidelines that shape doctors' practices, patient advocacy organizations, letter writers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and even oncologists on Twitter, according to a series of papers on money and influence published Tuesday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Britain's prime minister said Tuesday that the United Kingdom will walk away from the European Union's single market and unified court system, making a sharp break with its largest trading partner.

In a speech delivered about six months after voters passed a referendum requiring Britain to leave the EU, Prime Minister Theresa May laid out a plan for what that split would look like, emphasizing limits on migration into the country.

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