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A bumper sticker spotted in Montana reads, "No barley, no beer." It's a reminder that Montana's barley farmers are struggling. Barley is an unforgiving crop that needs a precise recipe of water and sunshine to thrive — too much of either will cause it to wither and die. And amid a changing climate and unpredictable seasons, that's exactly what's happening.

A federal policy that began almost a century ago is still harming Philadelphia. Beginning in the 1930s, the federal government encouraged mortgage lenders to withhold credit from areas where people of color or immigrant communities lived — a process that became known as "redlining." While the government eventually passed a measure to get rid of the practice in the 1960s, its effects still linger. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service… More trouble for bitcoin: South Korea is mulling a plan to ban cryptocurrency trading in an area of the world that’s seen some of the highest demand. We explain what it means for the future of bitcoin.  Then, peaceful protests have turned violent in Tunisia as anger over government austerity measures heats up. We’ll take you there and explain why protesters are calling the 2018 budget unfair. Afterwards, we’ll explain how one organization in the U.K. is getting women back to work using a model akin to speed dating. 

Delta Air Lines released its latest earnings report this morning, sharing just how much money it made during the last few months of 2017. The company beat Wall Street expectations, earning 96 cents per share. The airline has laid out some lofty goals to push its profit margin higher and contain costs this year. The industry expects to get a boost from the Republican tax plan.   

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Senate Democrats want to CTRL+Z FCC net neutrality repeal

Jan 11, 2018

The controversy over net neutrality hasn't died down a bit. In December, the Federal Communications Commission overturned rules that prevent internet service providers from blocking, slowing down or charging more to access content online. The ruling drew the ire of internet users and small business owners arguing that net neutrality protects consumers and internet startups.

01/11/2018: The battle to bring back net neutrality

Jan 11, 2018

The controversy over net neutrality hasn't died down a bit. In December, the Federal Communications Commission overturned rules that prevent internet service providers from blocking, slowing down or charging more to access content online. The ruling drew the ire of internet users and small business owners arguing that net neutrality protects consumers and internet startups. Since then, states are considering their own laws, and this week, some 44 senators, including Republican Susan Collins of Maine, said they'll support a bill that would overturn the FCC's ruling.

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Authorities in many coastal states say they want Florida's deal. The Trump administration exempted Florida from offshore oil and gas drilling, and that prompts a question - why Florida and not anywhere else? Here's NPR's Greg Allen.

The Trump administration's plan to open most U.S. coastal waters to offshore oil and gas drilling is facing stiff opposition from many in the president's own party. On Tuesday, the administration said drilling would no longer be considered off the coast of Florida after pressure from Republican Gov. Rick Scott. And today, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, an early supporter of President Donald Trump, said he's asking for an exemption from the proposal as well. Critics of the plan, including Maryland Gov.

Despite his fondness for Cherry Coke and Oreos, Warren Buffett is fine. At 87, he’s still going strong. He also says he's not going anywhere. Still, Buffett's holding company, Berkshire Hathaway, has promoted two of its executives and put them on the board. That instantly makes them front-runners to succeed Buffett. With that, Berkshire gets points for doing succession right.  

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In the wake of the new tax law, we’ve heard a lot about how richer, generally high-tax and often Democratic-leaning states are going to take a hit. The federal government expects to raise some $600 billion, largely from those states, by limiting the state and local tax deduction.

Now there’s talk at the state level about how to dodge that blow. A few approaches have emerged thus far.

In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo is looking at swapping the personal income tax for a business payroll tax, which is still fully deductible at the state level.

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