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International climate talks continue this week in Bonn, Germany. But the actual host nation for the United Nation annual conference is Fiji, and it's the first time an island nation facing dire impacts of climate change has held the symbolic leadership role.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service…Venezuela owes investors $150 billion and one credit agency now say the country is in selective default. Afterwards we hear how Greenpeace activists are taking the Norwegian government to court today to stop Arctic oil drilling.  Then we look at how investors are reacting to the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar.

Nursing shortages are forcing hospitals to close beds, hire temporary nurses at great expense to fill the gap and possibly provide less than optimal care to patients. The problem is not just that people aren’t going into nursing, but also that existing nurses aren’t going into education.

In the tech world, the word “unicorn” refers to a startup company that investors value at more than $1 billion. Unicorns include companies like Uber, Airbnb and Pinterest. But a group of women founders said venture capitalists are too focused on the exponential growth that unicorns provide. They’re pushing back, and have come up with a new term, “zebras,” which they call companies that are both profitable and good for society. Marketplace’s Amy Scott talks with Mara Zepeda, one of the founders of the Zebra Movement.

So, $1.4 trillion is a lot of money. It's what all of the NFL teams together are worth, and then some. It's more than twice the Defense Department's 2016 budget. It's enough to buy nearly 3.2 million homes at the median U.S. home price right now.

With the rise of online banking, branches are looking for innovative ways to attract people. One bank in Berlin added a cafe and co-working space, as well as a kids’ corner and a space for gallery exhibitions. Plus, travel insurance is on the rise. And we have reports on dividend cuts at General Electric, the ongoing tax cuts saga and President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Department of Health and Human Services.

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When it comes to shop-till-you-drop capitalism, there's no match for China.

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PHARRELL WILLIAMS: (Singing) If your friends are asking where you've been today...

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And this is the sound of the political moment we're in.

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Another spin of the revolving door between industry and Washington

Nov 13, 2017

President Donald Trump has nominated Alex Azar as the next secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. If Azar is confirmed by the Senate, it’ll be a return trip for him. He was deputy secretary of HHS under the George W. Bush administration. Then he took a break, to work as a top executive at the drug maker Eli Lilly.

Would you eat lunch at the bank of the future?

Nov 13, 2017

Karsten Kammholz is taking a lunch break at a unique Deutsche Bank branch in Berlin.

“I don’t come here to do some banking, I just go here sometimes to eat my lunch,” he said. Kammholz confirms that, like in the United States, eating lunch at a bank branch is not normal in Germany. “One colleague said once, 'Come on, let’s go to the Deutsche Bank and eat something,'” he said. “I was looking at him like, 'OK, what?'”

Tariffs for solar power hardware move forward

Nov 13, 2017

The International Trade Commission is delivering its report to the White House on how much to tax imported solar panels and other solar power hardware. It’s the type of tariff President Donald Trump has requested, to help put “America First,” but it will have a major impact on the broader solar industry, from installation to power purchase agreements.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Vanity Fair has named Radhika Jones as its new editor-in-chief. Condé Nast, the magazine's parent company, announced the surprise selection Monday.

"Radhika is an exceptionally talented editor who has the experience and insight to drive the cultural conversation—balancing distinctive journalism with culture and humor," Bob Sauerberg, president and CEO of Condé Nast, said in a statement.

General Electric announced today that all is maybe not well inside the multinational conglomerate empire. CEO John Flannery said the next couple years will be less profitable than previously thought and that, among other changes, he company will cut its annual dividend in half. That may sound scary if you're holding some GE stock, or if your investment strategy is based on getting reliable chunks of income from dividends, but there’s more to it.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Nervous Americans are shelling out for travel insurance

Nov 13, 2017

Traditionally, Americans haven’t been big on buying travel insurance. When we travel within the United States, we may assume we’re covered for health needs, thanks to our health insurance, and maybe a credit card membership will take care of a canceled flight or lost bags.

But we may be changing our thinking. The US Travel Insurance Association said Americans spent almost $3 billion on insurance in 2016, up 19 percent from two years earlier.

With sexual harassment allegations dominating the headlines over the last few weeks, companies across the nation are revisiting their workplace training. In addition to reassuring employees that complaints of this nature will be taken seriously, some human resource offices have sent reminders about their sexual harassment policies and even requested that employees retake their training.

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