Education

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Texas' lieutenant governor is calling for the resignation of the Fort Worth Independent School District superintendent over guidelines intended to support transgender students.

Rheanne Tibbits

The UWM Honors College offered a class this spring called #BlackLivesMatter.

The movement – and hashtag, began in 2013 after a white Florida man was acquitted of shooting to death, Trayvon Martin, a black teen who had been walking through the neighborhood.

The final assignment of the UWM course was to create art about the Black Lives Matter movement.

On Mitchell Hall’s white gallery walls, works of art reveal what the words “black lives matter” mean to the students who took the UWM class that explored issues of race in America.

Martha Dalton/WABE

This week, WUWM's "Getting There" series explores school attendance around Milwaukee. Today, we examine what other cities have tried to get students in their seats. 

The year was 2011. The truancy rate in New York City public schools had hit 20 percent

District leaders decided to try something new and simple: calling the kids who weren’t showing up.

In Sarah Parrish's second-grade classroom, the colors are loud, but the kids are quiet.

It's Thursday morning. Her students sit at their desks, reading to themselves. Books about Ramona and Junie B. Jones. Mystery books, fantasy books ...

Marisa Sotelino has just finished Horse Diaries #3: Koda. She grins when asked about it, showing a mouthful of light green braces.

"It's interesting to see other people, or animals' point of view," she explains, "because, well, you can't be a different person."

Don Harder, Flickr

The word ‘truancy’ has one, clear definition: "the act or condition of being absent without permission." Some refer to it as ‘playing hooky.’ It’s also called absenteeism. Whichever way you spin it, it means you’re not showing up for classes.

When Dexter Weaver was a kid, as far as school was concerned, truancy was a four-letter-word.

“I had to go to school unless I was bleeding, or vomiting - a lot!” Weaver jokes. “Other than that, I was in school.”

The federal government is getting into hip-hop — well, sort of.

A case over school finance in New York has been dragging on now for more than 20 years.

Seven-year-old Anaya Ellick, who was born with no hands and does not use prostheses, recently won a national penmanship contest.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the early 1990s, voters in Oregon were feeling some tax anxiety.

Property values were rising, and many worried that also meant a rise in property taxes. And so, with something called Measure 5, they capped them.

Since schools depend heavily on property taxes, Oregon did something unique. The state decided to use income tax revenue to help offset the effect of this new property-tax cap.

There's just one problem: In tough economic times, income is more volatile than property values. And so began a roller coaster for Oregon's schools.

New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport is among the busiest in the country: More than 1,000 flights touch down and take off each day. More than 50 million passengers hurry through its gates each year.

But something else is happening, too.

Not far from the waxed floors of the terminals and the automated voice proclaiming the end of the moving walkway, there's a school. And a classroom that has six wheels, two wings and a tail. It is a Boeing 727, parked on the tarmac near the hangars and warehouses.

Helaine Hickson

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone discusses the possibility that UW schools might get more control over setting tuition. Also, he talks about the recent no-confidence vote by UW-Madison faculty expressing displeasure with the System President and the Board of Regents and how research conducted by UWM faculty impacts the community.

There's no magical spending threshold for student success. Solutions are also complicated by the fact that children with different needs require different levels of support.

To better understand those needs — and what it will cost to meet them — a state can commission what's called an "adequacy study."

Most states have already done at least one.

Michigan is a late-comer. Its first adequacy study is due out this month.

Rachel Morello

It's National Teacher Appreciation Week, which has us thinking about some of the standout educators from our own school days. 

We asked our staff, and some of you, "Who was your favorite teacher, and why?" The answers prompted smiles, good memories and fun remembrances of classrooms past. 

Saying "colleges have been treated as sanctuaries of learning where firearms have not been allowed," Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal vetoed a bill Tuesday that would have allowed licensed owners to carry guns on campus in all but a few buildings.

The "campus carry" legislation, HB 859, would have allowed guns on campuses and in buildings owned by any public college, technical school or other institution, providing exceptions only for areas used for athletic events, dormitories, and fraternity and sorority houses.

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