Education

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Earlier this year, WUWM highlighted racial disparities in our Project Milwaukee series: Segregation Matters. The series looked at the history of segregation in the city and how it impacts things like housing, health care, and education.

Jon Strelecki

As UWM celebrates its 60th anniversary, UWM Today has been taking a closer look at each of UWM's 14 schools and colleges. Today, the spotlight is on the College of Letters and Science.

The largest college at UWM is where many of the university's 26,000 call home. The college has majors and programs in the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. It's a wide offering that keeps Dave Clark, the college's acting dean, busy. He's the guest on this edition of UWM Today.

Rachel Morello

Spring has finally sprung around Milwaukee! And the warmer temperatures mean plenty of folks are looking for opportunities to get outside -- including teachers and students.

What's the best way to take your lessons outdoors?  That's something the folks in the Cedarburg and West Bend public school districts have been working on all year, with the help of a couple “Scientists in Residence.”

The day Ayden came home from school with bruises, his mother started looking for a new school.

Ayden's a bright 9-year-old with a blond crew cut, glasses and an eager smile showing new teeth coming in. He also has autism, ADHD and a seizure disorder. (We're not using his last name to protect his privacy.) He loves karate, chapter books and very soft blankets: "I love the fuzziness, I just cocoon myself into my own burrito."

"He's so smart but lacks so much socially," says his mother, Lynn.

The Trump administration has made school choice, vouchers in particular, a cornerstone of its education agenda. This has generated lots of interest in how school voucher programs across the country work and whom they benefit.

Some schoolkids might be happy if their school were knocked down.

Not in Nairobi.

On May 15, a group of primary school students sat at desks in the center of a main road to block traffic. Along with their parents, they were protesting the demolition of their school, the Kenyatta Golf Course Academy, over the weekend.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

An American university in Hungary is fighting for survival. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban wants to shut it down, even though European Union officials are warning him not to. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports.

No one likes to take tests. Sitting down to take a standardized test on a beautiful Saturday morning would not, almost certainly, be categorized as a fun weekend activity. Yet, it's a requirement many of us face at one point in life. So we sharpen our No. 2 pencils and get to work.

On Adriene McNally's 49th birthday in January, she heard a knock on the door of her modest row-home in Northeast Philadelphia.

She was being served.

"They actually paid someone to come out and serve me papers on a Saturday afternoon," she says.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Hello and welcome to another edition of NPR Ed's weekly national education news roundup!

DeVos heckled at Bethune-Cookman University

There's been an unprecedented spike in white supremacist activity on campuses across the U.S. since the election and college students and administrators are struggling to figure out how to respond.

Posters at the University of Texas at Arlington last month implored students to "report any and all illegal aliens. America is a white nation." Also last month, at the University of Pennsylvania flyers blared "Imagine a Muslim-free America."

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

May 12, 2017

With guest host John Donvan.

The controversial firing of FBI Director James Comey dominated the news this week. Guest host John Donvan and a panel of journalists discuss that and other happenings around the U.S., including the Texas governor’s ban on sanctuary cities and how Shaquille O’Neal might do as a sheriff.

Guests

Susan Davis, congressional correspondent, NPR

David Leonhardt, op-ed columnist, The New York Times; former editor, The Upshot, a New York Times website covering politics and policy

The Promise And Peril Of School Vouchers

May 12, 2017

Wendy Robinson wants to make one thing very clear.

As the long-serving superintendent of Fort Wayne public schools, Indiana's largest district, she is not afraid of competition from private schools.

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