Education

NPR Ed
10:08 am
Fri June 20, 2014

The Politics Of The Common Core

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announces his plan to remove Louisiana from tests associated with the Common Core.
Melinda Deslatte AP

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Wednesday that he wants to cut ties with the Common Core State Standards, the benchmarks in reading and math that he helped bring to the state four years ago, and replace them with new, Louisiana-specific standards.

"We won't let the federal government take over Louisiana's education standards," Jindal said in a statement. "We're very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators."

Read more
UWM Today
2:50 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Serious Threat Exists in Tropical Forests

Tom Luljak and Stefan Schnitzer
Credit Jon Strelecki

Tropical forests play a critical role in the health of our environment. About one third of the carbon dioxide in the world is stored in the trees and plant life in the forests.

But research led by a UW-Milwaukee biologist Stefan Schnitzer shows that storage system is at risk because of a serious threat that exists in tropical forests.

Read more
NPR Ed
7:26 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Free College For All: Dream, Promise Or Fantasy?

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 9:56 am

"Free" is a word with a powerful appeal. And right now it's being tossed around a lot, followed by another word: "college."

A new nonprofit, Redeeming America's Promise, announced this week that it will seek federal support to make public colleges tuition-free. That effort is inspired by "Hope" and "Promise" programs like the one in Kalamazoo, Mich., which pays up to 100 percent of college tuition at state colleges and universities for graduates of the city's public high schools.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:49 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Kids In Juvenile Detention Face Risk Of Violent Death As Adults

Girls who were arrested and detained were at particular risk for premature death in adulthood.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 8:24 am

Delinquent children are much more likely than their nondelinquent peers to die violently later in life, a study finds. And girls who ended up in juvenile detention were especially vulnerable, dying at nearly five times the rate of the general population.

"This was astonishing," says Linda Teplin, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University's medical school and the lead author of the study.

Read more
Education
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Philly Schools Teeter On Brink Of Layoffs, Struggling For Funding

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:33 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Once again, one of the most troubled school districts in the country is sounding alarm bells over funding. The head of the Philadelphia school district says he needs almost $100 million, and even that, he says, would just maintain a status quo he calls inadequate. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

Read more
Education
3:06 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Study Delivers Failing Grades For Many Programs Training Teachers

Colleges of education spend more than $6 billion every year preparing classroom teachers, but few students graduate ready to teach, according to a new study.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 7:33 pm

The nation's teacher-preparation programs have plenty of room for improvement, according to a new report.

A study released today by the National Council on Teacher Quality argues that teaching colleges are too lenient in their admissions criteria and have failed to prepare their students to teach subjects like reading, math and science.

Read more
Education
5:07 am
Tue June 17, 2014

City Council In Sweden To Decide The Fate Of Homework

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 6:26 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Schools out for millions of American kids - no more homework for a couple of months. Students in a town in central Sweden may be doing even better. The city council is debating whether to do away with homework entirely. Local officials argue that students should be able to learn everything they need during school hours and, says one, not burden their parents with it. Now there's a thought. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Ed
4:09 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Can Schools Solve The Tech Industry's Pipeline Problem?

When Google went public with data about the diversity of its workforce, it fueled the ongoing conversation about diversity in the technology industry.
Virginia Mayo AP

It's been only a couple of weeks since Google released the diversity numbers on its workforce, and there's been a lot of talk since then about why the tech giant and others in the industry don't really reflect the American population as a whole.

A well-written piece today in Mother Jones offers some provocative thoughts on what can be done about it — and schools could play a big role.

Read more
Education
11:29 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Is Educational Change Coming For Native Americans?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Ed
8:35 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Starbucks Will Pay For Employees To Complete College

Part-time barista, full-time student?
Yang Lee Starbucks

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 1:22 pm

Starbucks Coffee Co. today announces an unusually large tuition reimbursement for employees. It's in partnership with Arizona State University's highly ranked online program.

Starbucks employees who sign up for ASU's online courses as freshmen or sophomores will get a partial scholarship plus need-based financial aid; entering juniors and seniors with previous college credits will be able to finish their degrees with the public university for free.

Read more

Pages